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Electric Car

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BUSINESS
December 22, 1986 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
An astute businessman can sometimes profit from costly mistakes - take the case of Frank Flowers. The South Jersey businessman considers his disastrous attempt to manufacture and sell electric automobiles in the 1970s "a $3 million education. " Evidence of that mistake can be found in 150 leftover cars made to sell for $9,000 each, which he will gladly mark down to $1,500. Evidence that his expensive education is paying off can be found in Flowers' $1.5 million Gloucester County plant, which turns out 1,000 electric-powered scooters each month for the disabled and elderly.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Guy L. Davis has a grim prediction for the future of the gasoline-powered automobile: Its days are numbered. "Los Angeles and other major cities cannot meet pollution standards," he said. "We're losing the battle. Something has to be done. " Davis also foresees the world running out of fossil fuels. That one-two punch, he said, will lead to the demise of the automobile as we know it. And Davis has concluded there is only one way to solve the problem - go electric. "Electric cars are the future," the 54-year-old East Norriton resident said.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
By Charles Lane The Obama administration's electric-car fantasy finally may have died on the road between Newark, Del., and Milford, Conn. The New York Times' John M. Broder reported Friday that the Tesla Model S electric car he was test-driving repeatedly ran out of juice, partly because cold weather reduces the battery's range by about 10 percent. Broder's trip included a stretch with the conked-out car riding the back of a flatbed truck. Tesla chief executive Elon Musk tweeted on Monday that Broder's report is a "fake" and that "vehicle logs" show he "didn't actually charge to max & took a long detour.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A documentary as efficient and zippy as its subject, Who Killed the Electric Car? implicates Big Auto and Big Oil for murdering the commercial prospects of the late, lamented EV-1, which resembled, and even may have actually inspired, Lightning McQueen in Cars. Touted by General Motors as "the automobile of the 21st century," the battery-powered EV-1 literally was consigned to the scrap heap of the late 20th. According to Chris Paine's film, a companion piece to An Inconvenient Truth, 'twas a confederacy of technocrats and bureaucrats that ran this baby off the road.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
Isuzu's recent announcement that it had developed a "revolutionary" kind of electric storage device sounded like the breakthrough needed to make the electric car feasible - and thus populate our roads with non-polluting vehicles. The chief impediments to the practical use of electric cars have been the weight and cost of conventional lead-acid storage batteries and the time it takes to recharge them. The weight of the batteries slows the car and diminishes its range. The several hours required to recharge them further reduce the electric car's practicality, and the cost of their periodic replacement makes an electric vehicle more expensive to operate than a gas-powered one, even though its refueling costs are lower.
NEWS
June 12, 2011 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Certainly, the 2011 Chevrolet Volt is a technical tour de force. But it is more than an exquisitely engineered electric car. It is a brand-new solution to the electric vehicle's oldest problem - the limited range afforded by the onboard battery (or batteries) that powers it. While a complex engineering exercise, the Volt is, in principle, a very simple response to the range problem, a problem that will persist until we have a national charging-station infrastructure. The Volt does this by extending the 25-to-50-mile range afforded by the battery with a generator powered by a small gas engine.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, starry-eyed idealists have dreamed in vain of developing an electric car that would be affordable and environmentally friendly. Now a couple of companies have come up with an alternative electric vehicle that they hope will be a mass-market success - the bicycle. Not surprisingly, both firms are based in California, the state where environmental laws are among the toughest. Both have teamed up with major bicycle companies to build their products. First to market is the EV Warrior from the Electric Bicycle Co. of Burbank, Calif.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | By Scott Heimer, Daily News Auto Editor
It deals with a couple of current problems cleanly enough, but is it just relocating the source from the freeway to the smokestack? Call it Voltswagen or whatever you like (but not Charger), it is the often- hyped electric car prototype. Several manufacturers have put them forth as public relations gimmicks to show they're conscientious about cutting down on exhaust emissions and saving petroleum fuels. The most recent and advanced of the bunch is the General Motors' Impact (not named for its method of stopping, by the way)
NEWS
March 23, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a warm day with the top down, Steven Mortazavi was breezing along West River Drive when his eyes locked on the rearview mirror. A Philly police car was on his tail. Mortazavi wasn't speeding, but the cop followed him into a parking lot, paused behind him, and then - whew! - moved on. "He is so dying to give me a ticket," said Mortazavi, an Allentown pain-management physician. It had to be the car: Bright red. Sleek and curvy. Built for speed, it can accelerate from zero to 60 in 3.9 seconds and top out at 125 miles an hour.
NEWS
August 7, 2006 | By David A. Kirsch
For more than 100 years, the battery-electric car has been the car of tomorrow, but never the car of today. Why? A new documentary, Who Killed the Electric Car?, offers a captivating attempt to answer this question, but falls victim to the usual purist laments that sidetrack public policy. The "inconvenient truth" is that the battery-electric car - supposedly unsoiled by any fossil fuels - will never replace the family sedan. Those who continue to push for it are chasing a utopian dream, and ignoring a promising solution that is close at hand: the "plug-in hybrid," which recharges at home like a battery-electric car, but also draws power from a gasoline engine.
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NEWS
May 9, 2015
ISSUE | SICK LEAVE Home rule forgotten I find it astounding that the rationale of State Sen. John Eichelberger (R., Blair) in trying to abolish Philadelphia's sick-pay law is that local governments should not be allowed to govern, when it's a core Republican value that local communities should be able to do so ("Phila. sick-leave law is praised," April 22). Furthermore, the state House majority leader's spokesman, Steve Miskin, contends that government should not interfere with the private sector.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON A New Jersey lawmaker has introduced a bill aimed at allowing electric carmaker Tesla to continue to operate under a business model banned by the state. The bill, proposed by Assemblyman Timothy Eustace (D., Bergen), would allow any electric car manufacturer licensed by the state Motor Vehicle Commission to sell directly to consumers, instead of through a dealer. Eustace said Monday that the bill was in response to a decision by the commission that Tesla has said will force it to direct prospective buyers to stores out of state.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
By Charles Lane The Obama administration's electric-car fantasy finally may have died on the road between Newark, Del., and Milford, Conn. The New York Times' John M. Broder reported Friday that the Tesla Model S electric car he was test-driving repeatedly ran out of juice, partly because cold weather reduces the battery's range by about 10 percent. Broder's trip included a stretch with the conked-out car riding the back of a flatbed truck. Tesla chief executive Elon Musk tweeted on Monday that Broder's report is a "fake" and that "vehicle logs" show he "didn't actually charge to max & took a long detour.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
A NDREW DAGA, 55, of Malvern, is the principal founder and CEO of Momentum Dynamics, which is developing a wireless recharging system and other technologies for electric vehicles. Last month, the 10-employee start-up, which began in 2009, announced it had wirelessly charged a Chevy Volt. Momentum's wireless charger delivers more than 20,000 watts, far more than plug-in chargers supply. Q: How did you come up with the idea for wireless charging? A: I was working on a project to deliver solar power to troops during the Iraq war, which led me to a safe, short-distance method of transmitting power wirelessly.
NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Adam Garberand Joe Spadaro
Imagine a car that consumes no oil, has no tailpipe, and can get you wherever you need to go without ever visiting a gas station. That's the promise of electric vehicles, which got a huge boost this week when the Obama administration announced that fuel-efficiency standards will be nearly doubled, to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. Pennsylvania drivers currently spend more than $18 billion a year on gasoline. Oil consumed for gasoline and other uses produces more global-warming pollution than any other energy source, and oil emissions are our largest single source of smog, particulate pollution, and other toxins that cause thousands of asthma attacks and other respiratory problems every year.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A California company, infused with millions of federal dollars, is offering to install free charging stations in the homes of some Philadelphia-area owners of electric vehicles. In return, it wants your data. ECOtality Inc. announced Wednesday that it was expanding its federally funded EV Project to Philadelphia, as well as Atlanta and Chicago. The two-year-old project, which is now in seven states, is aimed at developing the infrastructure to support the electric-vehicle market, while also gathering data on how EVs are being used and recharged.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | Scott Sturgis
2012 Scion iQ: "Dude, where's the rest of my car?" Price: Starts at $15,995. Marketer's pitch: "iQ therefore I am. " Conventional wisdom: "What the heck is that little thing?" Reality: A little smarter than a Smart. Smallness is big: As the owner of an old Volkswagen Beetle, I have an affinity for small cars, and am happy to see so many choices at this scale. But the new-for-2012 Scion iQ takes things to a new level.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Emily Brill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gray Russell has been driving a Toyota Prius for six years. The hybrid vehicle totes him from his Montclair home to his workplace at the municipality every day - about a five-mile round-trip commute. Russell's old Prius doesn't have a plug-in component, so he doesn't need to use one of Montclair's four charging stations to power the vehicle. But once he starts test-driving the new Prius, that will change. Like other newer hybrid models, including the Chevrolet Volt, the new Toyota Prius can run gas-free for a set number of miles, powered only by a lithium-ion battery.
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