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Electric Factory

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000 | By Joey Sweeney, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like Shania, Celine and Whitney, matchbox twenty is emblematic of the tidal bland-out of contemporary Top 40 - a zone where all the songs sound the same, all the sentiments are paper-thin, and every coo and growl is a market-researched contrivance. Together, this crew constitutes what is probably the most popular genre today: music for people who don't like music too much. Despite not having released an album since 1996's 10 million-selling Yourself or Someone Like You, matchbox twenty remains modern-rock radio wallpaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Friday night, Erykah Badu, who wore her elaborate orange turban and surrounded herself with Eastern accoutrements, ankhs and burning incense, looked like a cross between an ancient Egyptian goddess and Afrocentric interplanetary traveler of the future. She sang like an angel. In an Electric Factory packed with people of melanin, Badu, throughout her loping, stylistically liberated (and liberating) set maximized the potential of her minimalist setup - drums, bass, keyboards, and three singers - by focusing her energies inward.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The old adage "you can't go home again" could be proved false by concert promoters Larry Magid and Adam Spivak when the new music venue dubbed the "re-opened" Electric Factory opens tonight at 7th and Willow streets. Female blues- and folk-tinged rockers June Rich, hard-edged Solution A.D. and bone-crunching Dandelion, plus Strapping Fieldhands and the Headlong Dance Theater, are booked for the all-local-act opening. And there's a lot more diversity where that came from - including important imports like the New Orleans jam band knockouts the Radiators on Sunday, edgy Sonic Youth next Wednesday, Pittsburgh's heartland rocker Joe Grushecky with his unbilled special guest Bruce Springsteen on Oct. 19 (an instant sellout)
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
Even in a holiday season, or maybe especially then, you can have too much of a good thing. Five guys named "moe. " proved this Tuesday night to a capacity crowd of folks in their 20s at the Electric Factory. Measured in minutes, the band played 66, rested 41, played 99, rested 2, and played 20 more. And that after opener Antigone Rising filled 50 minutes with hard-rock cliches. No live recording ever really captures the incarnate moe. For $20, you could have bought Tuesday's show, well-rendered on three compact discs, on your way out the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Amy Ray wants to put one thing straight: "No causes," she says. "The only cause is towards us. " So don't go to the Electric Factory on Wednesday expecting to raise your awareness, pledge your support or register to vote; the Suffragette Sessions Tour doesn't benefit this or spotlight that. "No," Ray says, "it's basically just performance the whole time. " She and fellow Indigo Girl Emily Saliers conceived of the SST five years ago while sharing a stage with Siouxsie Sioux and Ferron.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With much of musical Philly in dusty Texas for the annual South by Southwest fest, it's only fair that we had the Lone Star State's fattest calf - the toast of Houston, ZZ Top - on righteous display Saturday, and in an intimate setting to boot, the Electric Factory. That it happened to be the same evening Philly, Irish or not, was celebrating St. Patrick's Day only made the sold-out show's throng rowdier and ever more Erin Go Braghish. That's an atmosphere just ripe for a ZZ Top party.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ZED'S DEAD is an electronic band that took its name from the Quentin Tarantino thriller "Pulp Fiction. " The film includes a grisly overdose scene - and at the band's performance Saturday night at the Electric Factory, fact mirrored fiction when at least four people overdosed, causing the gig to be canceled, according to the fire department and social media. Police responded to the Electric Factory, at 7th Street near Callowhill, about 8 p.m. and found nine concertgoers passed out from possible overdoses, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fight over a billboard on the Electric Factory building - perhaps the most litigated sign in the city - has returned. After a decade of legislation and lawsuits over whether the owners could throw a "wall wrap" advertisement over their building at Seventh and Callowhill Streets, the proposal was thought dead when chief patron Frank DiCicco retired from City Council this year. But DiCicco's successor, Mark Squilla, resurrected the proposal on Thursday with a twist. Under his bill, 20 percent of the advertising revenue would go to three local elementary schools and possibly several community groups.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of the Electric Factory concert venue is part of a plan to renovate a mostly vacant structure in center city next to a Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts building into a mid-rise residential tower. The Logan Square Neighborhood Association held a vote Tuesday on owner Convention Center Parking LP's proposal to add four stories to the dilapidated six-story building at 142 N. Broad St. and to convert it into apartments or condo units, association President Drew Murray said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2015 | By Elliott Sharp, For The Inquirer
The band Say Anything, which played the Electric Factory on Sunday, borrowed its name from Say Anything - the 1989 late-teen romance film by Cameron Crowe. When a band does something like that, it will forever be expected to deliver an exceptional level of risk-taking drama. The film is famous for the scene in which John Cusack's character, in a last-ditch effort to win the heart of his high school crush, desperately but defiantly lifts an enormous boom box above his head and blasts Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes" outside her bedroom window.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Perri at the Mann I got chills just watching her "Jar of Hearts" music video. From  Christina Perri 's soulful inflections and her streak of platinum hair to the tasteful ink on her ivory skin, the whole package is one of which Philly can be proud. Perri, originally of (OK, technically) Bensalem, is coming back home as part of a summer tour with pop singer-songwriter  Colbie Caillat  and "Fight Song" vocalist  Rachel Platten . They're calling it, "The Girls Night Out, Boys Can Come Too Tour" and will be performing at The Mann (5201 Parkside Ave.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell is roundly lionized (or plain blamed) for birthing the modern, alternative rock-festival ideal with 1991's invention of Lollapalooza (not so alternative anymore, with McCartney and Metallica headlining this year's fest, but that's another story). In Farrell's creation of Lollapalooza, he forever overshadowed the reason for its inception: to showcase Jane before its first retirement. It was a spine-tingling outfit whose potent impact was immeasurable in its time, and whose 1988 classic Nothing's Shocking was celebrated on Saturday at the Electric Factory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With much of musical Philly in dusty Texas for the annual South by Southwest fest, it's only fair that we had the Lone Star State's fattest calf - the toast of Houston, ZZ Top - on righteous display Saturday, and in an intimate setting to boot, the Electric Factory. That it happened to be the same evening Philly, Irish or not, was celebrating St. Patrick's Day only made the sold-out show's throng rowdier and ever more Erin Go Braghish. That's an atmosphere just ripe for a ZZ Top party.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The question "Whatever happened to 50 Cent?," if not answered, was entertained, entertainingly, during Friday's show at the Electric Factory with longtime pals G-Unit. In the early 2000s, the often-shot drug-dealer-turned-gangsta-rapper from Queens went from zero to 100 after signing with Eminem's label and selling a gagillion copies of the hard, loping single "In Da Club" and the album Get Rich or Die Tryin '. Known for his menacing low register and diabolical delivery, Fiddy and G-Unit (Tony Yayo, Lloyd Banks, Young Buck, Kidd Kidd)
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If you're going to have a big arena-rock sound at this point in pop music's history, and you're not actually on an arena-size stage, you'd better have a way to sound big. The four brothers from South Africa who make up Kongos had to do that several ways at Electric Factory on Thursday night. First, these smooth-singing sons of South African vocalist-songwriter John Kongos - guitarist Daniel, bassist Dylan, drummer Jesse, and keyboardist and accordionist Johnny - had brotherhood. Their rich, high harmonies, on the pugnacious "I'm Only Joking" surely came from years spent sharing bedrooms and bathrooms, to say nothing of studios and stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since the 1990s, Marilyn Manson has crafted for himself an image as an "Antichrist superstar. " Each of his incendiary albums is a sonic blast filled with fear and loathing that would turn his hero, Hunter S. Thompson, absinthe- green with envy. His recent effort The Pale Emperor brings him to the Electric Factory on Friday. It's Manson's bluesiest and most focused melodic effort, loaded with hard, icy lyrics about Robert Johnson-like devils beneath his feet, killing strangers, and weeklong binges.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By David Stampone, For The Inquirer
After three transfixing selections of Scandinavian art-metal before a rapt Electric Factory crowd on Wednesday, Mikael Åkerfeldt, the mustached singer-guitarist-composer for the Swedish band Opeth, delivered some spot-on if understated banter: "As usual, we don't have much to offer other than five middle-aged guys playing rock, dazzling displays of lights, and a good sound. " In 11 studio albums over nearly 25 years, Opeth has offered perhaps the most fascinating evolution in global hard rock.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With all the troubles Ms. Lauryn Hill, (as she insists) has put herself through, nothing matters except how she sounds, and that she sounds at all. A tax-evasion prison stint, missed recording deadlines, showing up late for gigs - these mean little when it comes to the continuing adventures in the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill (to quote the 1998 multi-platinum solo album from the onetime Fugee). Before Hill's show Saturday at the Electric Factory with opener/friend the socio-conscious MC Talib Kweli, the question was: What would she sound like?
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