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Electric Factory

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000 | By Joey Sweeney, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like Shania, Celine and Whitney, matchbox twenty is emblematic of the tidal bland-out of contemporary Top 40 - a zone where all the songs sound the same, all the sentiments are paper-thin, and every coo and growl is a market-researched contrivance. Together, this crew constitutes what is probably the most popular genre today: music for people who don't like music too much. Despite not having released an album since 1996's 10 million-selling Yourself or Someone Like You, matchbox twenty remains modern-rock radio wallpaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Friday night, Erykah Badu, who wore her elaborate orange turban and surrounded herself with Eastern accoutrements, ankhs and burning incense, looked like a cross between an ancient Egyptian goddess and Afrocentric interplanetary traveler of the future. She sang like an angel. In an Electric Factory packed with people of melanin, Badu, throughout her loping, stylistically liberated (and liberating) set maximized the potential of her minimalist setup - drums, bass, keyboards, and three singers - by focusing her energies inward.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The old adage "you can't go home again" could be proved false by concert promoters Larry Magid and Adam Spivak when the new music venue dubbed the "re-opened" Electric Factory opens tonight at 7th and Willow streets. Female blues- and folk-tinged rockers June Rich, hard-edged Solution A.D. and bone-crunching Dandelion, plus Strapping Fieldhands and the Headlong Dance Theater, are booked for the all-local-act opening. And there's a lot more diversity where that came from - including important imports like the New Orleans jam band knockouts the Radiators on Sunday, edgy Sonic Youth next Wednesday, Pittsburgh's heartland rocker Joe Grushecky with his unbilled special guest Bruce Springsteen on Oct. 19 (an instant sellout)
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
Even in a holiday season, or maybe especially then, you can have too much of a good thing. Five guys named "moe. " proved this Tuesday night to a capacity crowd of folks in their 20s at the Electric Factory. Measured in minutes, the band played 66, rested 41, played 99, rested 2, and played 20 more. And that after opener Antigone Rising filled 50 minutes with hard-rock cliches. No live recording ever really captures the incarnate moe. For $20, you could have bought Tuesday's show, well-rendered on three compact discs, on your way out the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Amy Ray wants to put one thing straight: "No causes," she says. "The only cause is towards us. " So don't go to the Electric Factory on Wednesday expecting to raise your awareness, pledge your support or register to vote; the Suffragette Sessions Tour doesn't benefit this or spotlight that. "No," Ray says, "it's basically just performance the whole time. " She and fellow Indigo Girl Emily Saliers conceived of the SST five years ago while sharing a stage with Siouxsie Sioux and Ferron.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ZED'S DEAD is an electronic band that took its name from the Quentin Tarantino thriller "Pulp Fiction. " The film includes a grisly overdose scene - and at the band's performance Saturday night at the Electric Factory, fact mirrored fiction when at least four people overdosed, causing the gig to be canceled, according to the fire department and social media. Police responded to the Electric Factory, at 7th Street near Callowhill, about 8 p.m. and found nine concertgoers passed out from possible overdoses, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
November 17, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fight over a billboard on the Electric Factory building - perhaps the most litigated sign in the city - has returned. After a decade of legislation and lawsuits over whether the owners could throw a "wall wrap" advertisement over their building at Seventh and Callowhill Streets, the proposal was thought dead when chief patron Frank DiCicco retired from City Council this year. But DiCicco's successor, Mark Squilla, resurrected the proposal on Thursday with a twist. Under his bill, 20 percent of the advertising revenue would go to three local elementary schools and possibly several community groups.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Sum 41, the reigning kings of fresh-scrubbed pop punk, offer plenty of ammunition for their detractors. But at Friday's show at the Electric Factory, the Toronto outfit proved it could pull off one hour's worth of loud, spanking rock-and-roll and make the very young, capacity crowd believe it - which in today's pop world is more impressive than it sounds. Sum 41 is four bratty, brazen, and basically good-natured suburbanites who have chosen punk's (and metal's) spectacle as a way of letting off steam.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With all the troubles Ms. Lauryn Hill, (as she insists) has put herself through, nothing matters except how she sounds, and that she sounds at all. A tax-evasion prison stint, missed recording deadlines, showing up late for gigs - these mean little when it comes to the continuing adventures in the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill (to quote the 1998 multi-platinum solo album from the onetime Fugee). Before Hill's show Saturday at the Electric Factory with opener/friend the socio-conscious MC Talib Kweli, the question was: What would she sound like?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
It's no secret the Disco Biscuits love to play. Formed at the University of Pennsylvania in 1995, named for the '70s feel-good drug Quaalude, the Biscuits merged the jam-band form familiar from the Grateful Dead and the all-day-all-night sensibilities of a techno-tronic rave with electronic beats and boings to match. Along with launching Camp Bisco's music festival for improvisational bands and DJs in Upstate New York, the Biscuits play mini-fests, called City Bisco, where they take over your town and several venues for a stretch.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
A young woman moves from the Philadelphia area to Los Angeles, where she waitresses her way through the music business until a mutual friend of hers and the producers of Fox Television's So You Think You Can Dance uses her emotional song "Jar of Hearts" during its broadcast. " Stardom ensues. We're talking about Christina Perri, who hits the Electric Factory on Saturday night. That honey-voiced single sells 3 million-plus copies, she releases her debut 2011 album, Lovestrong , places her song "A Thousand Years" in the film The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn in 2012, and tours relentlessly to sold-out crowds.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Despite Donald Glover's pedigree as a writer for 30 Rock and his starring role on Community , there's nothing funny about his rap alter ego, Childish Gambino, and albums like Camp . Caustically witty and weirdly metaphorical with an oddly jagged sound track, yes, but hardly the stuff of stand-up or sketch comedy. Then again, during Gambino's Electric Factory show Friday, you couldn't help sensing this was performance art, with its drawing-room set and e-speak projections in accordance with the backstory of his album Because the Internet of a tweet-happy socialite bugging out in his mansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
One of the remarkable things about Philadelphia's Dr. Dog - and there are plenty - is how and what this band has changed, and kept the same, since its start in the late 1990s. Singer-songwriters Toby Leaman and Scott McMicken (who started their partnership under the name Raccoon), along with keyboardist Zach Miller, began their lives as Dogs with a low-fi, pop-psychedelic aesthetic and silly chord changes reflecting their dippy lyrics. Today, there's nothing low-fidelity or daffy about Dr. Dog's words or its grand, aggressive chamber-psych sound - be it the shaggy Be the Void of 2012 or 2013's B-Room , the latter album rich with the plush feel of Philly soul at its most lustrously harmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On a snowy Philly weekend, the once and former king of chill-wave, Ernest Greene of Washed Out, is in a nice, warm place. "Mexico is great," Greene says. "Our set last night was on the beach, right as the sun was setting. Pretty much the best possible scenario for my music. " Greene and his ensemble play Electric Factory this weekend. Washed Out's now-classic 2011 album Within and Without was dozy synth-pop of the most frozen (and sparsely recorded) order. But Washed Out released a warmer album, Paracosm , this summer, and has been touring ever since.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The scene: a Saturday afternoon in December. A Santa appears in the frame, walking through Old City. Muscular and tall, not your usual Santa, but, OK, you can deal with a slender Santa. Then a short, blond guy Santa appears in Rittenhouse Square. Then a goateed African American Santa, similarly appointed in the usual red-and-white fur, materializes in Washington Square. Two redheaded women, decked in Santa gear, appear in University City and the Italian Market. That's when you realize: You're in the middle of the Running of the Santas, a Philly-originated tradition (created 1998)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Janelle Monáe is in a hurry, maybe it's because she has so much ground to cover. Opening her U.S. tour on Sunday in support of her dazzling, diverse new CD, The Electric Lady , at - where else? - the Electric Factory, the 27-year-old Kansas City native took an appreciative audience through a highly personalized survey of the history of genre-blending African American pop.lin During a nearly two-hour evening   , Monáe tipped her cap to Cab Calloway and covered Michael Jackson and Prince.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neko Case's new album, The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You , is one of those works that benefited from the personal torment of its creator. Worse , which brought Case and her five-member ensemble, including assistant front woman Kelly Hogan, to the Electric Factory on Wednesday, is not a breakup album. It's a collection of original songs - plus a cover, of Velvet Underground singer Nico's "Afraid" - spurred by the death of Case's parents and grandmother.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Depending on how you read it, the title of Fall Out Boy's Save Rock and Roll can be seen as a call to arms or a comic-book boast: Are they asking us to save rock, or letting us know they've got the situation in hand? At a sold-out Electric Factory on Thursday night, they were cheerleaders and saviors both, rallying an adoring crowd and urging them to find their own way. Part of the motivation for "Fall Out Boy 2.0," as bassist Pete Wentz dubbed the band's return from a four-year hiatus, was inspiring younger generations to pick up the torch.
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