CollectionsElectric Factory
IN THE NEWS

Electric Factory

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000 | By Joey Sweeney, FOR THE INQUIRER
Like Shania, Celine and Whitney, matchbox twenty is emblematic of the tidal bland-out of contemporary Top 40 - a zone where all the songs sound the same, all the sentiments are paper-thin, and every coo and growl is a market-researched contrivance. Together, this crew constitutes what is probably the most popular genre today: music for people who don't like music too much. Despite not having released an album since 1996's 10 million-selling Yourself or Someone Like You, matchbox twenty remains modern-rock radio wallpaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Friday night, Erykah Badu, who wore her elaborate orange turban and surrounded herself with Eastern accoutrements, ankhs and burning incense, looked like a cross between an ancient Egyptian goddess and Afrocentric interplanetary traveler of the future. She sang like an angel. In an Electric Factory packed with people of melanin, Badu, throughout her loping, stylistically liberated (and liberating) set maximized the potential of her minimalist setup - drums, bass, keyboards, and three singers - by focusing her energies inward.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The old adage "you can't go home again" could be proved false by concert promoters Larry Magid and Adam Spivak when the new music venue dubbed the "re-opened" Electric Factory opens tonight at 7th and Willow streets. Female blues- and folk-tinged rockers June Rich, hard-edged Solution A.D. and bone-crunching Dandelion, plus Strapping Fieldhands and the Headlong Dance Theater, are booked for the all-local-act opening. And there's a lot more diversity where that came from - including important imports like the New Orleans jam band knockouts the Radiators on Sunday, edgy Sonic Youth next Wednesday, Pittsburgh's heartland rocker Joe Grushecky with his unbilled special guest Bruce Springsteen on Oct. 19 (an instant sellout)
NEWS
January 1, 2004 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
Even in a holiday season, or maybe especially then, you can have too much of a good thing. Five guys named "moe. " proved this Tuesday night to a capacity crowd of folks in their 20s at the Electric Factory. Measured in minutes, the band played 66, rested 41, played 99, rested 2, and played 20 more. And that after opener Antigone Rising filled 50 minutes with hard-rock cliches. No live recording ever really captures the incarnate moe. For $20, you could have bought Tuesday's show, well-rendered on three compact discs, on your way out the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Amy Ray wants to put one thing straight: "No causes," she says. "The only cause is towards us. " So don't go to the Electric Factory on Wednesday expecting to raise your awareness, pledge your support or register to vote; the Suffragette Sessions Tour doesn't benefit this or spotlight that. "No," Ray says, "it's basically just performance the whole time. " She and fellow Indigo Girl Emily Saliers conceived of the SST five years ago while sharing a stage with Siouxsie Sioux and Ferron.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ZED'S DEAD is an electronic band that took its name from the Quentin Tarantino thriller "Pulp Fiction. " The film includes a grisly overdose scene - and at the band's performance Saturday night at the Electric Factory, fact mirrored fiction when at least four people overdosed, causing the gig to be canceled, according to the fire department and social media. Police responded to the Electric Factory, at 7th Street near Callowhill, about 8 p.m. and found nine concertgoers passed out from possible overdoses, the Associated Press reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell is roundly lionized (or plain blamed) for birthing the modern, alternative rock-festival ideal with 1991's invention of Lollapalooza (not so alternative anymore, with McCartney and Metallica headlining this year's fest, but that's another story). In Farrell's creation of Lollapalooza, he forever overshadowed the reason for its inception: to showcase Jane before its first retirement. It was a spine-tingling outfit whose potent impact was immeasurable in its time, and whose 1988 classic Nothing's Shocking was celebrated on Saturday at the Electric Factory.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Eleven years after its start, 10 years since its debut album Juturna (named for the Roman goddess of wells and springs), Doylestown's Circa Survive continues to be a harbinger of wordy, experimental, pop-hardcore, with heartbroken emotionalism and sometime-silly philosophical conceits as its twin-towering guides. Anthony Green's powerful, whiny voice and stream-of-consciousness rants, together with Colin Frangicetto's jiving, jackhammering guitars, all but defined the 21st century's shift in hard-emo's tone from broke-down and busted to brilliantine and bristling.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2016 | By Bill Chenevert, For The Inquirer
'To-ri! To-ri! To-ri!" The chant erupted several times from the ravenous crowd who had come to worship a special kind of pop star at the sold-out Electric Factory. Tori Kelly is a good girl, a self-made 23-year-old with artistic integrity, an impressive catalog, and musical chops that earned her a jam invitation from the late, great Purple One. She had the room in the palm of her hands. Fitting that she would open Monday night's concert with "Unbreakable Smile," the title track from her major-label debut released in June.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With winter's spate of snow, sleet, and chill blanketing Philadelphia like a death shroud, it was nice having two California bands - Los Angeles' Best Coast and San Diego's Wavves - bring the sunshine with a coheadlining tour, Summer is Forever, at the Electric Factory on Wednesday. Though in each case, for the most part, the subtle nuances of the bands' respective catalogs (Wavves' surf-spy-inspired hard core comes courtesy of Nathan Williams, Best Coast's sandy indie-pop is written by Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno)
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | Staff Report
Canceled or Postponed Several college and professional sports teams postponed Saturday games until Sunday: - Celtics at 76ers : Sunday at 7 p.m. - SMU at Temple : Sunday at noon. - UNC Wilmington at Drexel : Sunday at noon. - Providence at Villanova : Sunday at 1 p.m. - St. Joseph's at La Salle : Sunday at 5 p.m. - Flyers vs. Islanders: Postponed, and no specific makeup date set. The Jennifer Nettles show Friday night at the Tower Theater in Upper Darby has been postponed.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | Deborah Woodell, Staff Writer
We would be remiss in calling Randy Blythe nostalgic, but there are hints that the Lamb of God frontman longs for the old days. For instance, he said in a recent interview, he likes when his band is the opening act. "I hate headlining," Blythe said, chuckling, speaking in advance of Saturday's sold-out show at the Electric Factory in which Lamb of God will, in fact, headline. The bill also features Anthrax, Deafheaven, and Power Trip. "I'd rather open up. It's a lot easier to steal a show early on. By the time we play, three other bands are going to play.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Claire Sasko, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Manney, 64, of Tacony, a highly regarded Philadelphia rock pioneer, filmmaker, archivist, and producer, died Wednesday night, Dec. 9, at Fox Chase Cancer Center, just a week after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Mr. Manney paved the way for the far-famed Last Minute Jam, a weekly music gig held at Khyber Pass in Old City and then, starting in 1987, at J.C. Dobbs. For years he amassed a far-ranging collection of rock souvenirs, which over time became a sort of alternative at-home museum that flooded the "Bunker," as the basement of his home was known.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2015 | By Hillary Rea, For The Inquirer
In a ceremony before the Miley Cyrus and the Dead Petz show on Saturday night at the Electric Factory, Wayne Coyne, lead singer for the Flaming Lips (Miley's band for the show, renamed the Dead Petz), blessed the crowd by sprinkling glitter confetti and blasting a cannon of party streamers. Thus he gave us permission to embrace the unlikely collaboration between Cyrus and the Lips. Cyrus' limited-city Milky Milky Milk tour is in support of her surprise (and free!) streaming opus, Miley Cyrus and her Dead Petz - a 23-song, 90-minute concept album with most of the songs cowritten and coproduced by the Lips.
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Eleven years after its start, 10 years since its debut album Juturna (named for the Roman goddess of wells and springs), Doylestown's Circa Survive continues to be a harbinger of wordy, experimental, pop-hardcore, with heartbroken emotionalism and sometime-silly philosophical conceits as its twin-towering guides. Anthony Green's powerful, whiny voice and stream-of-consciousness rants, together with Colin Frangicetto's jiving, jackhammering guitars, all but defined the 21st century's shift in hard-emo's tone from broke-down and busted to brilliantine and bristling.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Alejandro Rose-Garcia is too sinewy, cheekbone-y cute and actor-ish to be considered a rustic, boho hobo folk singer, let alone a solitary bluesy one-man band. That's more the job of Austin-based Shakey Graves, Rose-Garcia's bummy, strumming, country-punk alter ego who sang his heart out at the Electric Factory on Saturday night, stuffing the room full with boyish, like-minded, boxcar-riding imitators and their gals with matching bandanna-on-a-stick accoutrements. Graves, a longtime local favorite with two albums (2011's Roll the Bones , 2014's And the War Came )
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Last year, guitarist Rob Grote and his Warwick High School chums drummer Braden Lawrence and bassist Connor Jacobus, all from Lititz, Lancaster County, moved to Philadelphia as The Districts. By then, they already had a murky, weirdly driving folk sound, as heard on their debut album, Telephone , and its signature hit, "Funeral Beds. " Grote, now 20, says this poetic, rough-hewn Mumford & Sons-meets-Television tone "reflects who we were that year. Now, we're far off from where we started, but we're where we intended to be. " The band is set to play Friday at the Electric Factory.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|