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Electric Guitar

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BUSINESS
August 4, 1997 | By Kent Steinriede, FOR THE INQUIRER
The electric guitar made a clumsy twang when Bill Lawrence let it fall to the ground. He then gave it the ultimate test. He placed one cowboy boot, and then the other, on the neck, letting the neck support all of his weight. "If you can't stand on a neck, it's a piece of garbage," Lawrence said. While there's much more to a good electric guitar than a strong neck, Lawrence uses this exercise as an example of the attention to detail he puts into his Wilde USA guitars. Depending on the design, most guitar necks would have snapped under Lawrence's weight.
LIVING
April 5, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Don't freak out, man, over the scoring in Allen Krantz's new work. Small symphony for strings and electric guitar is as friendly as friendly gets, maybe even to hard-core classical ears. "Eric Clapton meets Mozart" is what Krantz calls the work, which was premiered Monday night at the Academy of Vocal Arts by the Wister Quartet at the last 1807 & Friends concert of the season. True, I suppose. The four-movement work adheres to strict classical form, and the lyricism of Krantz's style - American, tonal, solicitous - is purely classical.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It won't be the same when they're gone. The polished wood, steel strings, amplifiers and recorders had been his life for more than 60 years. Now they were lined up in his sprawling Mahwah mansion, like old friends waiting to say goodbye. In a corner of one room, Les Paul picked up what may be the first electric guitar, then one of the first electric solid-body guitars. And in another room was the first multi-track synchronized tape recorder and eight-track recording machine. The legendary musician-inventor, renowned for the countless guitars that bear his name, could track the history of the music recording industry in his home - history that he helped make with a little late-night tinkering and ingenuity.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
VINELAND, N.J. - Police in South Jersey believe a homeowner's watchdog might have fallen for a bribe from a burglar bearing treats. Vineland police say the evidence came in the form of a scrap of beef jerky the homeowner found on the kitchen floor. He said no one in the house normally eats it. The break-in occurred during the day Sunday, apparently undeterred by the resident pit bull, the Atlantic City Press reported. Police say the burglar got away with more than $200 in cash, a $400 electric guitar, and a necklace worth about $350.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1995 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's great to see another woman enter the punk/pop arena with a guitar in hand and something to get off her chest. It's equally heartening when that woman has the mature perspective of a 31-year-old. But concerts aren't built on good intentions. Jennifer Trynin and her band just didn't measure up at J.C. Dobbs on Thursday night. High expectations for the show were largely due to Trynin's debut, Cockamamie (Warner), on which the Bostonian spares us none of her hurt feelings and plays some rugged electric guitar.
NEWS
August 18, 2010
Two brothers, former employees of a Philadelphia-based company, were charged Monday with stealing about $60,000 in equipment from a Runnemede office, authorities said. Walter Crumb Jr., 40, and Michael Crumb, 36, allegedly stole 16 computer servers valued at $2,200 apiece, 100 Windows 7 software licenses, an electric guitar, and a digital camera from TelAmerica Media, in the 100 block of Rose Avenue, said Runnemede Police Lt. Paul Dailey. The brothers, who allegedly pawned the items in Philadelphia, were released Monday on their own recognizance, Dailey said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
The new-music establishment sounded dated at Speculum Musicae's concert Monday night at the Settlement Music School. Works by Jacob Druckman and Charles Wuorinen, written in styles that only 10 years ago were fresh and new, seemed to have aged noticeably - and not too gracefully - next to the works of two more progressive composers. Not only was the musical material that made up Steve Mackey's Troubador Songs (1991) novel; so was the combination of string quartet and electric guitar that performed it. There was nothing inherently unnatural about the tonal effect created by the refined sound of the string quartet and the crudeness of the electric guitar.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
See "Free Play" when you're in a playful mood. The first time I went to this exhibition, a project of Independent Curators International (ICI) making its first appearance at the Arcadia University Art Gallery before moving on, I wasn't prepared for artworks that demanded my participation. I realized I'd have to return with a more carefree frame of mind and more expendable time. The second visit was the charm. I played Ping-Pong with an enthusiastic gallery visitor, tossed dice on a game board to determine my future, and went up and down on a seesaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Popular Music Critic
The theme for the Who's 25th anniversary reunion tour is "The Kids Are All Right. " Last night, Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle and company proved the point with a vengeance, in a no-holds-barred, 40-song music marathon at the Glens Falls Civic Center. It was their first full-fledged show together since Dec. 17, 1982. A long time between gigs. The Who steamed up this dinky Adirondack hockey rink for more than three hours and took no prisoners. In other words, they slew all 5,000 souls in attendance - old fans and younger "classic rock " converts alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2005 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
You can call Erin McKeown a lot of things - singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, musical storyteller, even a social activist on some level - but don't call her a folksinger. She doesn't have a problem with folkies, mind you; she just doesn't think she is one, despite how she's often billed as such. "I did a TV show recently where they announced my name, called me a folksinger, and then I walked onstage holding an electric guitar," the 27-year-old Virginia-bred, Massachusetts-based musician recalls.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
See "Free Play" when you're in a playful mood. The first time I went to this exhibition, a project of Independent Curators International (ICI) making its first appearance at the Arcadia University Art Gallery before moving on, I wasn't prepared for artworks that demanded my participation. I realized I'd have to return with a more carefree frame of mind and more expendable time. The second visit was the charm. I played Ping-Pong with an enthusiastic gallery visitor, tossed dice on a game board to determine my future, and went up and down on a seesaw.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Few musicians of any genre have had the wide-ranging influence across vastly different styles of a Jimi Hendrix. One look at the roster of axmen who are congregating to celebrate Hendrix's legacy at the Keswick on Friday is proof of that. The lineup for this year's "Experience Hendrix" tour includes blues legend Buddy Guy, C├ęsar Rosas and David Hidalgo of Chicano rock band Los Lobos, virtuoso guitar stylist Eric Johnson, second-generation iconoclast Dweezil Zappa, and metal six-string-slinger Zakk Wylde.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Pittsburgh party rapper Mac Miller could have done things the easy way. With its sex-'n'-stoner-centric lyrics and blunt music, his 2011 album Blue Slide Park debuted atop the Billboard Top 200 chart, making him the toast of the booze/beer/bong set. When time came for the next one, all the ginger, scruffy MC had to do was follow suit. Instead, he made this year's Watching Movies With the Sound Off , an electronic, often ruminative, rubber-soul album. Then he launched his Space Migration Tour, which hit Festival Pier on a rainy Saturday - along with the band the Internet (a hip-hop Radiohead if ever there was)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
As a duo, Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale may have released only one record, the appropriately titled Buddy and Jim , but their 30-plus years of friendship made their show at World Cafe Live on Friday night feel like a long-awaited reunion. Complementing each other sartorially as well as musically - Lauderdale wore a pale-blue suit with embroidered lapels, Miller a paisley sport coat over a patterned shirt - the veteran comrades meshed seamlessly with their three-piece band. Between songs, they reminisced about old times, including a joint gig at the North Star not quite two decades ago, and tossed gags back and forth like a vaudeville double act. "We finish each other's senten-" Lauderdale began, raising an eyebrow at his partner.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By John Farmer Jr
The news, more than a year ago, that the 56-year-old musician Danny DeGennaro was murdered in his mother's home in Levittown caused little stir beyond the Bucks County area. Various websites and blogs noted that he had been a member of the Grateful Dead-inspired band Kingfish, and that he had played with the also recently deceased Clarence Clemons. But that was it. There was so much more to it. To him. I heard Danny for the first time nearly 20 years ago, in the spring of 1993.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
A few songs into her set at World Cafe Live on Tuesday night, North Carolina singer-songwriter Tift Merritt paused to address the crew. "Can we get some rock and roll sex lighting up here?" It's not the kind of request you'd expect from Merritt, whose songs tend toward the melancholy, introspective end of the scale, and, indeed, it was prefaced by a pledge to make no further demands for the next several weeks (including, of course, the remainder of the show). But it's of a piece with the assertiveness and sense of self present on her fifth album, Traveling Alone , released last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Neil Halstead spent his early 20s at the helm of Slowdive, one of the U.K.'s signature shoegaze bands and a touchstone for current young groups such as Wild Nothing, the Pains of Being Pure at Heart, and Beach Fossils (who recently released a cover of Slowdive's "Alison"). According to Halstead, Slowdive "was more about the atmosphere and playing loud guitars," and it wasn't until after Slowdive disbanded in 1995 that he became interested in traditional songwriting as opposed to My Bloody Valentine-inspired waves of sound.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Los Angeles Times
On July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan stepped onstage at the Newport Folk Festival, plugged in an electric guitar, and changed the course of pop music history. The performance caused a furious reaction. The crowd booed loudly, and folk icon Pete Seeger tried to stop the show. Dylan and his band retreated after three songs, coming back to play an acoustic set. Still, Dylan's provocative move has long been pointed to as a key moment when electric rock music eclipsed folk as the sound of the '60s generation.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
As the grandson of country's founding father, Hank Williams III - currently billing himself as Hank 3 - is a direct heir to the music's roots. But rather than fall back on his lineage, Williams offers himself as a musical mongrel, continuing some traditions and establishing a few of his own. The supreme statement of Williams' divergent desires arrived last fall, when at the end of an oft-acrimonious relationship with Nashville's Curb Records, he...
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