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Electric Shock

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NEWS
January 17, 2008
STUART Caesar's rant about justifying torture is absurd. I'm sure all those who admitted to witchcraft while being drowned and stretched over a table during the Spanish Inquisition and Salem witch trials really were witches and warlocks. Any human will confess to anything or disclose whatever under extreme duress. I'm almost 100 percent positive that if I applied electric shock to Stuart Caesar long enough, he'd confess to having an affair with Sasquatch. Niko Chan, Philadelphia
FOOD
July 2, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Personal Bug Zapper Manufacturer: Made in China for the Companion Group, Oakland, Calif. Where: China Outlet and Gourmet Garage, Marlton Price: $8.90 I had wanted to try one of these hand-held bug zappers even before the Housefly That Refused to Die invaded my kitchen. This tennis-racquet-shaped product is priced at $14.99 and $12.95 in various kitchen catalogs, and is widely available on the Internet; the China Outlet and Gourmet Garage sells it at a deep discount.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An 8-year-old Springfield Township boy was listed in satisfactory condition yesterday after being burned when he touched a 7,600-volt electrical wire while climbing a tree near his home. James Catalfano, of the 1700 block of Walnut Avenue, fell 35 feet after touching the wire. Police said he suffered third-degree burns, but a spokeswoman at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia said his burns were minimal and his release from the hospital would come soon. Springfield police received a call at 8:33 p.m. Friday that a boy was on fire at Walnut Avenue and Oreland Mill Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | By John Tierno FOR THE INQUIRER
Arachnophobes, consider yourselves warned: Stay away from the Academy of Natural Sciences. All others (including those of you wanting to conquer your fears), should check out "Bugs From Around the World," the new exhibition opening Saturday. Highlights include an emperor scorpion, safely encased in glass (a good thing too, as its sting supposedly feels like an electric shock) and, on level with most kids' gross-out sense of humor, a 2 1/2-foot-long dung beetle replica. Displays of live insects and other arthropods in decorative kiosks will simulate regions on four continents.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writers
As smoke continued to waft from the fire-gutted Dietz & Watson warehouse in Delanco, officials probed the cause of the multialarm blaze, and the company on Tuesday expressed confidence it would be able to get its products to its customers. "If there's any glitches at all, it will be minor and over the next couple of weeks," Dietz & Watson spokesman Steve Riley said. "The products are perishable, so we don't have months and months of supply on hand at Delanco. It's usually into Delanco and out really quickly after that.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The electric-shock treatment that President Bush may undergo today to return his heartbeat to a normal rate is described by doctors as a common procedure that entails little risk to his health. "If the drug treatment he is undergoing doesn't work," said George Bren of George Washington University Hospital, "he'll get the shock to reset the electrical activity in his heart. That will allow his heartbeat to start over again from scratch. " Cynthia Tracy, a Georgetown University Hospital heart specialist, said the procedure involved "very, very little risk" and was commonly used to correct the ailment, called atrial fibrillation, that Bush suffers.
NEWS
November 24, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD JR., Daily News Staff Writer
Hay Tran, a Cambodian refugee, thinks he survived the long trek to a refugee camp in Thailand because of his size. "I was small and ate less food," said the slight 16-year-old. "The older people tended to suffer more. Most who survived were children. " Tran, now living in Philadelphia, is part of the Children of War Tour, a group consisting of 62 teen-agers from 18 countries. Members of the tour, sponsored by the Religious Task Force, will travel to 27 cities telling people about the horrors of war and their own hopes for peace.
NEWS
April 2, 2008 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Buying an automated external defibrillator - a portable device that can revive a heart-attack victim with electric shock - for use at home appeared to provide no significant life-saving benefit in the first major study in household settings. The devices, which cost $1,000 or more, did help heart-attack survivors live through a second crisis. But so did CPR, and at much lower cost. In reporting their findings online in the New England Journal of Medicine and in Chicago at the American College of Cardiology meeting, the researchers noted that the life-saving potential of defibrillators was well established in hospitals, emergency vehicles, and in public settings such as airports and casinos.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Mr. Payback," the first interactive, laserdisc movie to open across the country, arrives in Philadelphia today at the RiverView Plaza. "Mr. Payback" qualifies as "interactive" because the audience - using a control panel attached to each seat - decides how the story evolves. Every minute or so, the movie presents the viewers with a menu of plot choices. Each viewer pushes a button reflecting a choice, and the majority rules. Here's an example. As "Mr. Payback" begins, its vigilante hero (Billy Warlock)
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY OSCAR CASTILLO, Daily News Staff Writer castilo@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE DEATH OF A HORSE Saturday night at Cowtown Rodeo in South Jersey has prompted allegations of animal cruelty. The rodeo's veterinarian, Dr. Robert Stevens, ruled that the 9-year-old horse, Duke, died of a ruptured aneurysm. "The horse's pale gums and the way it went down is consistent with an aneurysm," said Stevens, adding that he has seen six similar aneurysms in his career. "The horse was in great shape," Stevens said. "It's something that would've happened if it was out in the field or in the show.
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NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane expressed concern Wednesday over reports of dramatic increases in electricity costs and encouraged customers to submit their complaints to her office. "These spikes in the price of electricity are alarming and have put many consumers, especially the poor and elderly, in a dire situation," Kane said in a statement. Customers can reach out to the Consumer Protection Helpline at 1-800-441-2555 or the Office of Consumer Advocate at 1-800-684-6560.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Rita Giordano and Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writers
As smoke continued to waft from the fire-gutted Dietz & Watson warehouse in Delanco, officials probed the cause of the multialarm blaze, and the company on Tuesday expressed confidence it would be able to get its products to its customers. "If there's any glitches at all, it will be minor and over the next couple of weeks," Dietz & Watson spokesman Steve Riley said. "The products are perishable, so we don't have months and months of supply on hand at Delanco. It's usually into Delanco and out really quickly after that.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | BY OSCAR CASTILLO, Daily News Staff Writer castilo@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
THE DEATH OF A HORSE Saturday night at Cowtown Rodeo in South Jersey has prompted allegations of animal cruelty. The rodeo's veterinarian, Dr. Robert Stevens, ruled that the 9-year-old horse, Duke, died of a ruptured aneurysm. "The horse's pale gums and the way it went down is consistent with an aneurysm," said Stevens, adding that he has seen six similar aneurysms in his career. "The horse was in great shape," Stevens said. "It's something that would've happened if it was out in the field or in the show.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many heart-failure patients, Ronald Grzymala was in a bind. His weakened heart put him at risk of sudden cardiac arrest, so he needed to have a device placed in his chest that could jump-start his heart if it stopped. But he couldn't safely undergo the complicated implantation surgery because of other health problems. Six months ago, the Southampton, N.J., resident found a solution at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had an experimental implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)
NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By TOM KNOX
DEREGULATION of Pennsylvania's electric rates is scheduled for 2010. This will remove rate caps that have been in place for 10 years. Experts predict that this will increase electric rates to consumers up to 65 percent, with some consumer advocates arguing that the increase will be closer to 100 percent. Some legislators say this could be the biggest tax increase in state history. Years ago, the electric companies promised that deregulation would create increased competition and savings for consumers.
NEWS
April 2, 2008 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Buying an automated external defibrillator - a portable device that can revive a heart-attack victim with electric shock - for use at home appeared to provide no significant life-saving benefit in the first major study in household settings. The devices, which cost $1,000 or more, did help heart-attack survivors live through a second crisis. But so did CPR, and at much lower cost. In reporting their findings online in the New England Journal of Medicine and in Chicago at the American College of Cardiology meeting, the researchers noted that the life-saving potential of defibrillators was well established in hospitals, emergency vehicles, and in public settings such as airports and casinos.
NEWS
January 17, 2008
STUART Caesar's rant about justifying torture is absurd. I'm sure all those who admitted to witchcraft while being drowned and stretched over a table during the Spanish Inquisition and Salem witch trials really were witches and warlocks. Any human will confess to anything or disclose whatever under extreme duress. I'm almost 100 percent positive that if I applied electric shock to Stuart Caesar long enough, he'd confess to having an affair with Sasquatch. Niko Chan, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 12, 2006 | By Si Liberman FOR THE INQUIRER
The cruise-ship doctor's bill was $1,328. It was a fantastic bargain, though, because the physician may have saved my wife's life. Dorothy, a vitamin-junkie, exercise-prone health nut who rarely got sick, mysteriously had developed high blood pressure, a chronic urge to cough, a rapid pulse, and occasional palpitations. Medications didn't help, and she stopped taking them. Tossing aside her internist's recommendation that we postpone or cancel the 12-day Caribbean cruise on the Crystal Harmony, she declared, "I'm all packed, and we're going.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | By John Tierno FOR THE INQUIRER
Arachnophobes, consider yourselves warned: Stay away from the Academy of Natural Sciences. All others (including those of you wanting to conquer your fears), should check out "Bugs From Around the World," the new exhibition opening Saturday. Highlights include an emperor scorpion, safely encased in glass (a good thing too, as its sting supposedly feels like an electric shock) and, on level with most kids' gross-out sense of humor, a 2 1/2-foot-long dung beetle replica. Displays of live insects and other arthropods in decorative kiosks will simulate regions on four continents.
SPORTS
September 27, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Dale Earnhardt Jr. was found to have an illegal car yesterday in qualifying at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama. Earnhardt, who has won a record four straight Winston Cup races at the high-banked tri-oval, was set to start 10th in tomorrow's EA Sports 500. But his No. 8 Chevrolet didn't get past inspectors who discovered the right quarter-panel was too low. "A clear violation," NASCAR spokesman Jim Hunter said. Earnhardt's time was disallowed and he had to take a provisional spot, starting 38th in the 43-car field.
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