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Electrician

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NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Prybutok, 89, an electrician, educator, and ham radio operator who supplied communications during Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii in 1992, died of kidney failure Sunday, Nov. 27, at Atria, an assisted-living residence in Center City. Mr. Prybutok was an electrician at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for three years. Then for 20 years, he was a foreman and estimator for Peter H. Lowenthal & Co., an electrical contractor in North Wales. He was an active member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 98. In 1979, Mr. Prybutok changed careers and became a vocational education teacher at Dobbins Technical High School and then at Edison High School.
NEWS
June 8, 1992 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patrick Narducci of Erdenheim, Montgomery County, a self-taught electrician and lifelong perfectionist who ran the family electrical business with his son and grandson, died Thursday at Chestnut Hill Hospital. Born in 1915 in Philadelphia, Mr. Narducci graduated from Roman Catholic High School and traveled the country doing odd electrical jobs. He then founded the Narducci Electric Co. of South Philadelphia, and eventually ran it with his son, Joseph A., and his grandson, Joseph E., as the only employees.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Richard S. Wells, 69, mayor of Tullytown and a former superintendent of buildings, died Tuesday at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township, Bucks County. He had suffered from cancer for three years. A Democrat, he was elected to a four-year term as mayor in 1997 after serving on the Tullytown Borough Council since 1990. "He was a champion for seniors," said his wife of 46 years, Margaret Blankenship Wells. Mr. Wells, an electrician by trade, retired in 1992 after 12 years as supervisor of buildings at Pennsbury Manor, the historic home of William Penn north of Levittown.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Although a special amendment would allow him to be licensed as a West Chester electrician, longtime neighborhood activist Norman Bond is incensed with the restrictions that would be placed on him. "It seems like there's somebody in that office that just doesn't like me. . . . They just want to put a lot of restrictions on me," he said after last week's Borough Council meeting. "Why should I go all the way back to square one and do all this stuff when I've done all this stuff?" At the meeting, Borough Council members unanimously authorized the borough solicitor to prepare an amendment to the electrical code providing that an oral exam be administered on a one-time basis; if passed, a provisional license could be issued for residential work only, with a permanent license to be issued after mandatory inspection of the first three major residential rewiring permits; the same procedure would be followed for commercial and industrial work.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Rudolph J. "Rudy" Wolf, a retired electrician who wore his Philadelphian heart on his sleeve wherever he went, died Sunday. He was 83 and lived in Lansdale, Montgomery County. Many years ago, his daughters, Betty Rogers and Jane White, took Rudy and their mom, Elizabeth, on a trip to New England. While in Rutland, Vt., the girls thought it would be nice to take their parents to their first drive-in movie. "Before it became dark, he looked at all the parked cars looking for Pennsylvania tags and went up and struck up a conversation with them, asking where they were from," Rogers said.
NEWS
June 25, 2010
Kenneth Lloyd Morse, 88, of Berwyn, an electrician and community volunteer, died of complications from a neurological disease Tuesday at Wayne Center. Mr. Morse was operating Ken's Electrical Service in Maine when he was recruited by Eastern Baptist College, now Eastern University, to work as head electrician. He remained at the school for 18 years. After retiring in December 1987, he volunteered for 13 years at Manor Care in King of Prussia. He visited residents and assisted with the guinea pigs, rabbits, and dogs that were used in the pet-therapy program, his daughter Bettie Ann Brigham said.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
West Chester Borough Council President Ann E. Aerie requested that longtime neighborhood activist Norman Bond be given an electrician's license, even though he has twice failed to pass a required written exam. Two years ago, the borough adopted a code requiring all licensed electricians to pass a test given by an electrical underwriting inspection agency. Although Bond has been doing electrical work in the borough for 30 years, his failure to pass the test means he cannot be licensed.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Earl H. Edwards, 83, of Marshallton, a retired electrician and one of the founding members of the West Bradford Fire Company, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at Chester County Hospital in West Chester. Mr. Edwards, who was born and reared in Ramseytown, N.C., had resided in Marshallton for almost 50 years. "He was with the fire company from the very beginning" more than 40 years ago, said his daughter Wanda Jeannie Graves. During World War II, he was an amateur boxer with the Civil Conservation Corps.
NEWS
February 5, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph P. Molino, 82, of Havertown, a retired railroad electrician and decorated World War II veteran, died Saturday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Molino, whose parents were Italian immigrants, grew up in South Philadelphia. He dropped out of South Philadelphia High School to work in the mailroom of the Pennsylvania Railroad at 30th Street Station. During World War II, he served in the Army infantry in Europe. In March 1945, his unit came under attack while advancing on Schmitten, Germany.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis J. "Frank" Cunningham, 79, of Springfield, formerly of Drexel Hill, a longtime electrician, died Monday, July 14, of cardiorespiratory arrest at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Cunningham worked for 50 years as an electrician with IBEW Local 98 of Philadelphia before retiring in 1992. One of his proudest achievements was serving as acting foreman during the construction of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia in the late 1960s. Mr. Cunningham, born at Misericordia Hospital in Philadelphia, graduated from West Catholic High School, and attended Villanova University for a short time before joining the Army.
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NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy, Tricia L. Nadolny, Chris Brennan, and Jeff Gammage, STAFF WRITERS
The FBI raided homes and offices across Philadelphia and South Jersey early Friday as part of a sweeping investigation of a powerful electricians union and its leader, John J. Dougherty. The FBI, acting in concert with the IRS, also searched the City Hall office of Councilman Bobby Henon, a key Dougherty ally and a paid union leader. Federal authorities executed search warrants at more than half a dozen locations, including Dougherty's house in South Philadelphia, his sister's home next door, the Local 98 hall at 17th and Spring Garden Streets, and the Mount Laurel home of union president Brian Burrows.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016 | Jennifer Adams, For The Inquirer
Q: I saw your article about outdoor lighting. Do you do consults? I'm in a three-story condo building in a downtown location, and we want to light the sidewalk along the entrance to our building. It's very dark there at night. - K.W. A: Thank you so much for writing. Unfortunately, for many reasons, I can't personally consult on a project like this. But I can provide some ideas that you can discuss with a local landscape contractor or electrician, as well as your building manager or homeowners' association.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
When Philadelphia City Councilman Bobby Henon talks about past campaigns - a second-floor headquarters, maps lit up in highlighters, knocking on door after door - you get a sense that the lulls between elections must be torturous for him. "I mean, it's exhilarating. I love the action," he says, his eyes wide, a caged-in smile resting in the corners of his mouth. "Give me the ball," he says, the grin spreading. "Just give me the ball. " Maybe that's why Henon, after winning his second term unopposed, set his sights on Council's second-most-powerful post, often viewed as the heir apparent to the presidency: majority leader.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN YOU entered Solomon West's home in Mount Airy, you were greeted by a portrait of a man in a Naval uniform. The subject was Solomon West. And the artist was Solomon West. Solomon was a man of many talents, a hardworking guy driven by a work ethic that wouldn't quit. Art, especially portrait-painting, was how he relaxed from his career as an electrician, at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and Amtrak. Wherever he went, from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz, on which he served in the Navy, to his civilian jobs, Solomon was frequently honored for his dedication to his duties and reluctance ever to take a day off. Solomon West, whose many interests also included gardening, cooking, winemaking and fishing, all roles that he threw himself into with a passionate dedication to detail, died Friday after a short illness.
REAL_ESTATE
February 8, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: I have a modest suburban split-level that is 50 years old. As we've had work done, such as the kitchen 10 years ago, we've had two subpanels added to the breaker box, which is 100 amps. Our current electrician is recommending cleaning up the breaker box with a larger one and possible upgrading to 200 amps. The 200-amp service would cost more and would be more for a future buyer's needs than for our needs. Another inspector suggested that with the efficiencies of modern bulbs and appliances, we should be fine with the 100 amps.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The executive board of the influential electricians' union IBEW Local 98 will remain unchanged after a vote Saturday returned incumbents allied with the union's business manager, John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers' election was remarkable due to federal oversight brought on by a complaint filed by two challengers who failed to win. Kenneth Rocks and Kevin O'Sullivan filed complaints with the U.S. Department of Labor, saying they were unfairly denied a place on ballots.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curtis Thomas Sr., 100, a retired electrician who brought nearly two dozen others into the trade and who was a block captain in Germantown for 40 years, died Thursday, Aug. 28, at Dresher Hill Health & Rehabilitation Center. He was the father of State Rep. W. Curtis Thomas. Mr. Thomas, who served with the Tuskegee Airmen, was one of the first African Americans to work for Philadelphia Gas Works, where he was an electrician for more than 40 years, said his son. He also installed the Christmas lights at his church, Jones Tabernacle A.M.E.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis J. "Frank" Cunningham, 79, of Springfield, formerly of Drexel Hill, a longtime electrician, died Monday, July 14, of cardiorespiratory arrest at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Mr. Cunningham worked for 50 years as an electrician with IBEW Local 98 of Philadelphia before retiring in 1992. One of his proudest achievements was serving as acting foreman during the construction of Veterans Stadium in South Philadelphia in the late 1960s. Mr. Cunningham, born at Misericordia Hospital in Philadelphia, graduated from West Catholic High School and attended Villanova University for a short time before joining the Army.
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