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BUSINESS
October 31, 1990 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Typewriter Warehouse, located on a side street off Springfield Road in Westbrook Park, sits in a windowless, cinder-block structure that looks abandoned. But the building is alive inside with imagery from the past: Glossy photos of stars of the golden age of Hollywood stare down into the showroom. And, somehow, Clark Gable and John Wayne seem right at home with vintage Royals and Remingtons. Typewriter Warehouse, owned by Joe Haig - who also happens to be a movie buff - is one of the few outposts of the manual typewriter in Delaware County.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Jenny Barchfield, Associated Press
SANTA RITA DO SAPUCAI, Brazil - Brazilian inmate Ronaldo da Silva hops on a bicycle and pedals furiously, clocking up several miles before slowing down and jumping off. Silva hasn't gotten far, in fact not an inch. He's still inside the medium-security prison where he's serving a 51/2-year sentence for holding up a bakery, standing next to a stationary bike. But he did move a bit closer to freedom. Silva is part of an innovative program that allows inmates at a prison in Brazil's southeastern Minas Gerais state to reduce their sentences in exchange for generating power to help illuminate the town at night.
NEWS
June 27, 2010
Thousands of homes and businesses remained without electricity Saturday as utility company crews worked to repair the outages left from a powerful storm that swept the area Thursday. About 30,000 customers still did not have power by about noon Saturday, said Karen Muldoon Geus, Peco Energy Co.'s director of communications. All electricity service should be restored by Sunday night, she said. More than 200,000 homes and businesses lost power, mainly because of downed trees that snapped lines.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1998 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Last Friday morning, PGW managers pulled out the stops when they announced their intention to partner with a California energy company to sell electricity under Pennsylvania's deregulated electricity market initiative. In a gala media show, actors portraying Thomas Edison and Ben Franklin lauded the alliance between the city-owned utility and Edison Source, of City of Industry, Calif. There were balloons, PGW sunglasses and plenty of pastry. By day's end though, some of those balloons burst when the public advocate filed a 25-page opinion urging the Philadelphia Gas Commission to reject PGW's proposal.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
A freak accident in the Grenloch area of Washington Township knocked out electric power to more than 5,200 customers yesterday, according to a spokeswoman for the Atlantic Electric Co. Washington Township police said a backhoe being transported on a flatbed trailer fell over on its side at 6:50 a.m. on Grenloch-Hurffville Road near County House Road, as the tractor-trailer was making a turn, and knocked down an electric transformer housed on...
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
FirstEnergy Solutions, facing an uproar in several states over its proposal to charge fixed-rate residential electricity customers a one-time fee of $5 to $15 to offset high winter costs, has decided to rethink that idea. "Even though our contracts allow us to pass through surcharges, we have decided we won't seek reimbursement from residential customers for the added costs," Donald R. Schneider, president of the Akron company, said in a statement Friday. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission last week delayed ordering an investigation of the "pass-through" charge, which First Energy had proposed to offset extra charges imposed in January by the regional grid operator.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
Electricity is in the news these days. After more than a century of being sent a regular take-it-or-leave-it bill from our only source of it, now we're being given a choice of a supplier. But that raises a lot of questions, not just about what we're being asked to choose, but also some more basic questions as well. Here are some: What is electricity, anyway? Well, it's two things, actually. One, it's a stream of minute particles called electrons, so small they're invisible to us. And, two, it's a commodity that can now be bought and sold on the open market.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and SCOTT HEIMER, Daily News Staff Writers
That weather furnace enveloping the area is breaking electricity records as well as thermometers. Forecast for a tumble today is the day-old record for hourly consumption of electrical power. Philadelphia Electric Co. spokesman J. William Jones predicted 6.463 million kilowatts of electricity would be drawn by customers between 4 and 5 p.m. That's when temperatures were expected to be in the high 90s and, according to Accu-Weather meteorologist Ken Reeves, "some bank thermometers are going to read 100 or slightly higher.
NEWS
November 20, 1996
Just when you thought it was safe to make a long-distance call without getting bugged by the Dime Lady, the Legislature is itching to enact a sweeping bill that would deregulate who could sell you electricity. The bill looks pretty good to us, but (surprise) we know our wisdom is not infinite. So it's a deep concern that the final language has been in place only since Nov. 12. Something minor but important about how it all fits together just may have been missed. And how many legislators understand what they'll be voting on - or as lame ducks have incentive to care?
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Warning that extreme weather is here to stay, state regulatory officials this week began weighing steps that New Jersey electric utilities should take to improve response times when restoring power to customers. At a hearing Wednesday in the Statehouse Annex, the Board of Public Utilities (BPU) heard a consultant retained by the agency detail some of the 143 recommendations made to deal with future major storms. Two unprecedented storms in 2011, which left nearly 3 million electric customers without power, triggered the investigation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 1, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Today's home buyers - millennial first-timers and everyone else, it seems - are looking for houses in move-in condition. Move-in translates to houses with no expensive problems. Even though credit remains rather tight these days, home buyers are opting to take on larger mortgages rather than take on the work required by shells or fixer-uppers they can purchase more cheaply. Among older resale houses, one issue that keeps coming up is old wiring, especially the first-generation electrical system known as "knob and tube.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The 25-inch RCA console color TV looks picture-perfect for watching Walter Cronkite. Stereo speakers big enough to serve as furniture back in the '80s are all plugged in and all about the bass. And a hulking Sony U-Matic video recorder seems ready to reel. "It's a really obscure format," explains Cherry Hill East senior Jake Tennenbaum, who has stacked nearly 60 mostly vintage pieces of consumer electronics equipment into a sculptural artwork with an eco-message. He named the array of entertainment artifacts - many of them fully operational - 13 Percent . That's the portion of all the gizmos and gadgets America throws away that ends up getting recycled.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Jane's Addiction leader Perry Farrell is roundly lionized (or plain blamed) for birthing the modern, alternative rock-festival ideal with 1991's invention of Lollapalooza (not so alternative anymore, with McCartney and Metallica headlining this year's fest, but that's another story). In Farrell's creation of Lollapalooza, he forever overshadowed the reason for its inception: to showcase Jane before its first retirement. It was a spine-tingling outfit whose potent impact was immeasurable in its time, and whose 1988 classic Nothing's Shocking was celebrated on Saturday at the Electric Factory.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years into Pennsylvania's much-heralded Era of Electric Choice, it's time to assess. Is it worth switching electricity suppliers? Maybe. Picking plans and suppliers is a gamble, as many discovered, to their dismay, during last year's chilling polar vortex. Since then, the state Public Utility Commission has toughened the rules, to make it harder for shady operators. But never underestimate the creativity of dishonest people. If you follow a few simple rules and filter out most of the noise, I've discovered, there are ways to achieve tortoise-like savings, without much sweat.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Supplee drives his Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid each weekday from his Collegeville home to work in Phoenixville. Usually, he drops it off at the electric car charging station at the Phoenixville Municipal Building parking lot and walks to work. But when Supplee returned to the lot from a meeting Thursday afternoon, he found a Nissan Leaf and a Ford C-Max using both available plugs - a first since the free stations opened in October. "I was kind of pleasantly surprised," said Supplee, 42, a landscape architect.
SPORTS
May 15, 2015 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
AFTER CONDUCTING a search of the jockeys' room at Parx Racing before the fifth race on Tuesday's card and discovering what several sources said was an illegal electrical device inside a jockey's glove, representatives of the Pennsylvania Racing Commission took jockey Angel Castillo off his remaining mounts. The device, known as a "buzzer" or "machine" or "battery," is about the size of a lighter, conducts electricity and has been used by rogue jockeys through the years to shock a horse in an attempt to get the horse to run faster.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here's a clever way to secure a parking spot on Philadelphia's congested streets and help save the planet, too. Buy an electric vehicle. Under a little-publicized program, EV owners can apply to the Philadelphia Parking Authority to install a curbside charger in front of their homes. If approved, the PPA will mark the spot with EV-only parking signs. It's more effective than the time-honored trick of using lawn chairs to save a parking spot. And it's backed by the authority of legions of eager PPA enforcement officers.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
PJM Interconnection, Inc., the regional grid operator based in Valley Forge, on Wednesday appointed an insider as its next chief executive officer. Andrew L. Ott, the executive vice president for markets, was picked to succeed Terry Boston when he retires at the end of 2015. Boston, who has led PJM since 2008, was previously executive vice president of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Ott, an 18-year PJM veteran, previously worked in transmission planning and operations at General Public Utilities.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE look at the moon and think, isn't that pretty. Louis Diodoro looked at the moon and said, "Let's go there!" Louis was an aeronautical engineer with General Electric for nearly 30 years, working on many key aspects of America's space exploration. His department designed and built the nose cones for the rockets that, in 1961, first sent a chimp into space, and then in July 1969 - the culmination of an aeronautical engineer's dream- sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to walk on the moon in the Apollo 11 program.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2015 | By Andy Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Electric utilities across the nation are responding to slumping sales by boosting fixed customer charges, generating a guaranteed cash flow regardless of the volume of energy a customer consumes. Pennsylvania's two largest electric companies, Peco Energy Co. and PPL Electric, have filed in recent days rate-increase requests that seek substantial boosts in basic monthly charges. This shift toward fixed fees has aroused opposition in other states from advocates for low-income customers and seniors, as well as from renewable-energy and environmental groups.
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