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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Dreams of musical utopia have yet to materialize in the electronic-music world, but Network for New Music's Third Space Festival, running from Friday through Monday, is out to show mainstream audiences that the music's ethereal landscapes can be gorgeous. "It's been wrongly perceived as being ugly or crunchy, when it can be a beautiful extension of acoustic sound, with greater expressivity and emotional range," said Linda Reichert, Network's artistic director. "Some of these pieces are coming out of the world of Debussy - beautiful textures that could only be done electronically.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seth MacFarlane is known for his vocal prowess, especially when it takes the form of an intelligent talking dog, a pot-smoking bear, or an evil baby. But MacFarlane, creator and voice of many of the characters on Family Guy and American Dad , and director and star of this summer's Ted 2 , has a hobby: singing selections from the Great American Songbook. On Saturday, MacFarlane will be joined by the Baltimore Symphony to sing his favorite standards. He's coming straight off his press tour for Ted 2 . In August comes Blunt Talk , the new Starz series he executive produced, written by Jonathan Ames (HBO's Bored to Death )
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some might say the Philly goth scene is dead. That is, if a subculture fueled by lovers of the undead can die. In a sense, goths already are immortal: a culture revived from a different era. Inspired in part by the Victorians' interest in Gothic art and literary obsession with the darker side of life, '80s bands such as Joy Division, the Cure, and Bauhaus sparked a new genre of music and a generation of counterculturalists. The characteristic black painted nails, leather and lace outfits, and layers of ornate, spiked jewelry are only part of what it means to be goth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2003 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
If hype equaled dollars, the members of the musical/performance collective Fischerspooner would be billionaires. Their #1 (Capitol) would be worth their weight - singers, dancers, technicians - in gold. "It's pretty crazy," Casey Spooner said about Fischerspooner's meteoric rise. "We started pretty high - all this notoriety, but no record and just a bunch of free shows. I thought I'd have some gallery career. Now, we're releasing our debut on the same label as the Beatles. " From its trashy stage show and messy electronic mish-mash, Fischerspooner - the child of filmmaker-producer Warren Fischer and artist-singer Spooner - has become an avant- garde extravaganza: spartan yet plush, dancey and somber.
LIVING
September 3, 2000 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Another Saturday night in Old City: double-parking cars with their harrowing honking horns, men with close-cropped hair screaming at their chatty girlfriends about the dubious display of their chosen garments, screeching music bouncing from window to window. It's loud out there. La Tazza 108, Chestnut Street's new, airy coffeehouse, is a sanctum of inner calm. Mind you, it's not quiet. Rather, its basement - a low-ceilinged affair laced with gallery lighting, images of Mickey Mouse and Keith Haring dinosaurs, and lava lamps - is buzzing, purring, humming nervously with the sounds of Hologram, a monthly event where ambient electronic DJs meet live abstract-expressionist musicians for a teasing tug-of-war between noise and nuance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Mistake "The Philadelphia Experiment" for the '80s sci-fi flick instead of the monthly house music at Silk City tonight, and you'll reveal just how out of the know you are. Philly Soul Collective DJs Willyum, Carl Michaels and Kevin V will be spinning deep, soulful house with Tuning Spork's Sean O'Neal. But cede the experiment tonight for the "Ladies Night" installment of Audio-August at Saint Jack's with Chetana Borah, Pez Valdez and Jivey Rivas. Catch Willyum and Michaels on Saturday instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1997 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A brief history of the techno-fication of the U.S. pop-music industry: December 1996: In year-end wrap-up stories, critics bemoan the cookie-cutter sounds of alternative rock, and look to underground dance music, which has been perking along since the early '90s, as the next trend. MTV debuts Amp, a half-hour show specializing in the beat-based music. January 1997: Electronic-oriented singles by David Bowie and U2 wind their way up the charts. The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Newsweek "discover" the trend and quote industry executives who hail techno as a possible remedy for sagging sales, and enthuse about its range of styles.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
Of Montreal Kevin Barnes has made Of Montreal a vehicle for his id. Over the last 15 years, he's brought us some wonderfully unfettered, ambitious albums of psychedelic pop and of disco fun. He's also, occasionally, indulged his imagination and ended up with overstuffed song structures and barely decipherable lyrics, which happens too often on this year's Paralytic Stalks with tracks like the dissonant, 13-minute "Authentic Pyrrhic Remission....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether it's VH1's top "one-hit wonders" or your favorite magazine's sexiest people, everyone has a Top 5, 10, 50 "or whatever" list. We, too, are on the bandwagon this week to provide a taste of what is happening in the area. (Keep in mind, the following list is chronological, not by preference.) 1. At Transit at 9 tonight, finalists from the Kool Mixx DJ Competition preliminary match will prepare for yet another turntable battle as they vie for the right to represent Philly in the nationals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
CBS' "Cagney & Lacey," and "Designing Women," have been renewed for another season. The much-touted "Designing Women," whose time slot has been changed several times since its debut last year, will be back in the fall for its second season. It'll be "C&L's" sixth. CBS also said "Scarecrow and Mrs. King" will return to its lineup on May 7 in the 8 p.m. Thursday spot. "The Wizard" is being put on hiatus. And "Outlaws" will continue in its Saturday 8 p.m. time period. PLAYING THE PART Diana Ross will play a fictional character named Bertie Pickett in a television special that airs May 20 on Channel 6 from 9 to 10 p.m. The musical includes guests Billy Dee Williams, Little Richard, Bernadette Peters and Etta James.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seth MacFarlane is known for his vocal prowess, especially when it takes the form of an intelligent talking dog, a pot-smoking bear, or an evil baby. But MacFarlane, creator and voice of many of the characters on Family Guy and American Dad , and director and star of this summer's Ted 2 , has a hobby: singing selections from the Great American Songbook. On Saturday, MacFarlane will be joined by the Baltimore Symphony to sing his favorite standards. He's coming straight off his press tour for Ted 2 . In August comes Blunt Talk , the new Starz series he executive produced, written by Jonathan Ames (HBO's Bored to Death )
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Christmas musical traditions can seem like habits that accumulate as listeners hope to extend the holiday warmth of childhood into their adult lives. Yet the side effect is a relatively narrow repertoire. As wonderful as much of it is, can there be room for something new? The answer is yes as long as the Crossing is counted in. At New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Philadelphia choir is creating an annual tradition with David Lang's The Little Match Girl Passion . Closer to home, music director Donald Nally went out on more fragile limbs, often successfully, at the Crossing@Christmas concert Friday at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some might say the Philly goth scene is dead. That is, if a subculture fueled by lovers of the undead can die. In a sense, goths already are immortal: a culture revived from a different era. Inspired in part by the Victorians' interest in Gothic art and literary obsession with the darker side of life, '80s bands such as Joy Division, the Cure, and Bauhaus sparked a new genre of music and a generation of counterculturalists. The characteristic black painted nails, leather and lace outfits, and layers of ornate, spiked jewelry are only part of what it means to be goth.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like the John Cage and Morton Feldman festivals in recent years, Network for New Music's Third Space festival of electronic music revealed numerous pieces that shouldn't need a festival in order to be heard, but don't fit (sometimes physically) into typical concert halls. The venues of the Friday-through-Monday concerts told much of the story: Small studios and theaters at the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, and Community College of Philadelphia were chosen for their technological resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Dreams of musical utopia have yet to materialize in the electronic-music world, but Network for New Music's Third Space Festival, running from Friday through Monday, is out to show mainstream audiences that the music's ethereal landscapes can be gorgeous. "It's been wrongly perceived as being ugly or crunchy, when it can be a beautiful extension of acoustic sound, with greater expressivity and emotional range," said Linda Reichert, Network's artistic director. "Some of these pieces are coming out of the world of Debussy - beautiful textures that could only be done electronically.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012
JD McPherson He certainly knows how to put the roll in rock-and-roll. That inevitably gets JD McPherson pegged as a throwback, and, in truth, he does in many ways seem as if he stepped right out of the '50s. But like, say, the great Blasters 30 years ago, the former art teacher from Oklahoma brings such electrifying new energy and personal flair that he sounds less anachronistic than thrillingly timeless. The evidence is all over his debut album, Signs and Signifiers, maybe our favorite record of the year.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
Pop Mystic Pinball (New West ***1/2) John Hiatt opens his new album with "We're Alright Now," a rocker that's as optimistic as it gets: "The sun comes up every morning / Even when it's too cloudy to see. " Of course things don't stay so sunny. Throughout his four-decade career, Hiatt has also explored darker territory with visceral acuity and narrative vividness. That skill remains sharp, whether he's singing about the "Bite Marks" his baby has left on his mind and soul, taking a bullet to the head as the victim of a love triangle in the noirish "Wood Chipper," or feeling so invisible that "Blues Can't Even Find Me. " The music packs as much punch as the lyrics.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
MUSIC So? What! Honoring the 25th anniversary of his superpopular "So" album, Peter Gabriel has reassembled the band that made it and vows to perform the collection in entirety - including "Sledgehammer," "Don't Give Up," "Mercy Street" and "In Your Eyes. " Gabriel always invigorates his stage shows with theatricality and tech innovations, so . . . Wells Fargo Center, 3601 S. Broad St., 8 p.m. Friday, $39.50-$150, 800-298-4200, comcasttix.com. Record release party Fronted by the haunting siren calls of Irene Lambrou, the Philadelphia-based Medea has a fresh bunch of spell-casters and a new album ("Some Other Life")
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Jay-Z fulfilled his vision of bringing an electric and eclectic music festival to the heart of the city on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Saturday, headlining the first day of what he called the "first annual Made in America festival. " Jay-Z's razor-sharp and supremely confident performance, in which he enlisted the assistance of his partner in rhyme, Kanye West, as well as President Obama (in a prerecorded video), capped a nine-hour day filled with top-shelf performances from a range of rappers and electronic music acts and a smattering of indie rockers, giving Made in America a running start in carving out a niche as a uniquely urban-electronic mega-event in the crowded music festival season.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Jay-Z fulfilled his vision of bringing an electric and eclectic music festival to the heart of the city on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway on Saturday, headlining the first day of what he called the "first annual Made in America festival. " Jay-Z's razor-sharp and supremely confident performance, in which he enlisted the assistance of his partner in rhyme, Kanye West, as well as President Obama (in a prerecorded video), capped a nine-hour day filled with top-shelf performances from a range of rappers and electronic music acts and a smattering of indie rockers, giving Made in America a running start in carving out a niche as a uniquely urban-electronic mega-event in the crowded music festival season.
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