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NEWS
January 6, 1986 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
James C. Billups, head of the electronics department at Delaware County Community College and a tennis instructor, died Wednesday. He was 55 and a resident of West Philadelphia. Billups had been an electronics teacher at Delaware County Community College since the school opened in 1965 and at the time of his death was head of the department. He taught tennis at the West Park Tennis Club in Fairmount Park, where he was a member. For several years he also taught the game at the community college.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1993 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Only a fool strolls into an electronics store to buy a TV, VCR or other gadget without having done some homework. With so many models, styles and prices to choose from and so many salespeople eager to make a deal, any babe in the woods had better beware. For a quick refresher course in video and audio products, the March issue of Consumer Reports offers a "Guide to the Gear" that can't be beat. Published by the watchdog group Consumers Union, the magazine's product reports and evaluations are a touchstone for the cautious shopper.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1992 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is not a concert, but an event: No fists-in-the air or Elvis pelvis here. Members of Orbital are almost hiding behind their computer-driven instruments, which look like something out of WarGames. And the audience, well, the audience doesn't much care about what is going on onstage. People seem more interested in watching others. Using the measure of a traditional concert, Orbital's full-house visit to the Trocadero Wednesday night - as an opener for industrial-dance act Meat Beat Manifesto - gets a thumb-and-a-half down.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marty Levine, 82, a former electronics technician in the computer engineering department of The Inquirer, died of complications from neck surgery on Sunday, May 12, at his home in Mount Laurel. Mr. Levine worked for The Inquirer from April 1978 to December 1995. Born in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Levine graduated from Tilden High School there and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at Long Island University, his wife, Roberta, said in an interview Monday.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Murr, 65, of Valley Forge, a former electronics technician and businessman, died Wednesday, Oct. 17, from complications of acute myeloid leukemia. Mr. Murr a South Philadelphia native, was born to a close-knit Italian American family. He attended St. Paul's School, where he served as an altar boy. He was "a throwback type of gentleman," said his sister, Rose Murr. "Steve was just incredibly generous, dedicated to his work, and honest," she said. "He was very down to earth and took pride in the small things that he loved.
NEWS
January 3, 1988 | By Henry Klein, Special to The Inquirer
I am pursuing a B.S. in electrical engineering technology at Temple University and already possess a bachelor's degree in literature. What is the job outlook for electronic technologists (as opposed to full-fledged engineers)? Also, what's the outlook for technical writers? - S.N., Philadelphia. I think I see what you're trying to do - combine your interest in literature with a skill in electronics. However, you'd better do one thing at a time. You are embarking on a totally new four-year program aimed at positions in electro-mechanical manufacturing and quality control, production, electronic testing, sales and service, power systems, and development and research.
NEWS
January 14, 2012
Russell J. Roth Sr., 83, of Sellersville, who retired as an electronics manager in 1992, died Tuesday, Jan. 10, of pulmonary fibrosis at Grand View Hospital. Born in Rochester, N.Y., Mr. Roth graduated from high school there. He served in the Navy from September 1945 to April 1949 and again from 1950 to 1952. His daughter, Cynthia Mannes, said he served in shipboard fire-control units in the Mediterranean, then was recalled to duty during the Korean War. Mr. Roth earned his bachelor's degree at Rutgers University after night classes in the late 1960s, while he was a quality-control manager for Philco-Ford in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Bonnie Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George H. Heilmeier, 77, a Philadelphia native who created the first liquid-crystal displays for calculators, watches, and computers while working for RCA Laboratories, died Monday, April 21, of a stroke at a hospital in Plano, Texas. Mr. Heilmeier graduated from Lincoln High School and the University of Pennsylvania, and then earned advanced degrees including a doctorate in solid state materials and electronics from Princeton University. In the 1960s, he joined RCA Laboratories in New Jersey, where he worked with electro-optic effects in liquid crystals to create the liquid-crystal display.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Like the John Cage and Morton Feldman festivals in recent years, Network for New Music's Third Space festival of electronic music revealed numerous pieces that shouldn't need a festival in order to be heard, but don't fit (sometimes physically) into typical concert halls. The venues of the Friday-through-Monday concerts told much of the story: Small studios and theaters at the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, and Community College of Philadelphia were chosen for their technological resources.
NEWS
November 4, 2011
I'D RATHER talk pad thai, but iPad is on my menu, and I'm just asking for a digital middle digit. All those I asked about their iPads gave me three words: "I love it!" (That's how I feel about pad thai.) Micki Bjork, the Daily News' sweet high-tech Jill of All Trades, who keeps me from leaping from the tower - took five words: "I love it very much . " (But not as much as her goldendoodle dogs.) Unlike undeserving ex-wives, Micki doesn't lie to me, but let's start with my suicidal impulses.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The 25-inch RCA console color TV looks picture-perfect for watching Walter Cronkite. Stereo speakers big enough to serve as furniture back in the '80s are all plugged in and all about the bass. And a hulking Sony U-Matic video recorder seems ready to reel. "It's a really obscure format," explains Cherry Hill East senior Jake Tennenbaum, who has stacked nearly 60 mostly vintage pieces of consumer electronics equipment into a sculptural artwork with an eco-message. He named the array of entertainment artifacts - many of them fully operational - 13 Percent . That's the portion of all the gizmos and gadgets America throws away that ends up getting recycled.
REAL_ESTATE
May 17, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I hope I am not being too personal, but do you recycle? If not, are you experiencing "green guilt"? You knew someone would come up with a syndrome for people who want to recycle but forget to or don't have the time, correct? In this case, it's experienced by people who think they might not be doing enough for the environment, said Carl Smith, president and CEO of Call2Recycle, a nonprofit that collects and recycles batteries at no cost for consumers, municipalities, and businesses.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Council is slated to vote Thursday on a plan to bring two digital billboards to Center City. The bill, sponsored by Councilman Mark Squilla, allows for "urban experiential displays" near the Convention Center and Reading Terminal Market. Squilla has said there is widespread support for the bill, citing 300 letters sent to his office and more than 100 people expected to speak in favor of the digital billboards. A review by The Inquirer of the typed letters shows they are identical and that the signatures are in the same cursive font.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO will install new electronic signs in all 13 stations to provide updated train schedules and other information, the agency said Thursday. The signs, though, won't provide real-time information on train arrivals until an overhaul of PATCO's 120-car fleet is completed, probably in 2017, general manager John Rink said. The upgrade of the trains will provide the equipment necessary for the trains to communicate with the signs, he said. Installation of the new signs was approved Thursday by a Delaware River Port Authority committee for $1.68 million for six stations: Ashland, Westmont, Collingswood, City Hall, 9th/10th, and 11th/12th.
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | By Bonnie Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George H. Heilmeier, 77, a Philadelphia native who created the first liquid-crystal displays for calculators, watches, and computers while working for RCA Laboratories, died Monday, April 21, of a stroke at a hospital in Plano, Texas. Mr. Heilmeier graduated from Lincoln High School and the University of Pennsylvania, and then earned advanced degrees including a doctorate in solid state materials and electronics from Princeton University. In the 1960s, he joined RCA Laboratories in New Jersey, where he worked with electro-optic effects in liquid crystals to create the liquid-crystal display.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Freeman Crispin, 71, of Pilesgrove, who served in the U.S. Air Force Honor Guard and was part of President John F. Kennedy's funeral procession, died at home Tuesday, April 22, of brain cancer. Born May 4, 1942, Mr. Crispin grew up on a farm in South Jersey and attended Woodstown High School. At a canteen dance, he met Bonnie Brown, to whom he was married nearly 50 years, until her death in 2012. After graduating from high school in 1960, he joined the Air Force, motivated by a longstanding interest in serving his country, his daughter, Sherry Munyan, said.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moving from paper to electronic medical records is a mammoth undertaking for small doctors' offices, but one that is crucial to methods of managing care that are focused on keeping people out of the hospital rather than just treating illnesses. Meetinghouse Family Physicians, a three-physician practice in Marlton, started down the winding road toward fully electronic medical records about four years ago. "We're getting there. The doctors have all bought into it," said Phyllis Downy, Meetinghouse's office manager, said This year, Meetinghouse, which employs 17 people including the doctors, is gearing up to obtain a second level of certification from the federal government that it is making "meaningful use" of electronic medical records (EMR)
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The HealthShare Exchange of Southeastern Pennsylvania, a nonprofit formed to facilitate the electronic sharing of medical records among hospitals, doctors and insurers, has established its first link, between the University of Pennsylvania Health System and Crozer-Keystone Health System. The development, announced last week by HealthShare officials, was a big step in the highly fragmented Philadelphia-area health-care market, because the exchange could eventually close expensive information gaps that lead to redundant testing and other waste.
NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Miniature toy drones that can fly and crawl across the ceiling but steer clear of stratospheric prices. Wearable fitness sensors that can track your steps, stairs, calorie use, even your heart rate and sleep patterns. Three-dimensional printers for under $1,000 that can bring your creation to life. Every January during the Consumer Electronics Show, Sin City briefly turns into a technologist's imaginarium - a place to show off innovations, make connections, and catch a glimpse of everybody else's dreams.
NEWS
November 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways Group Inc. announced today that its customers can now use their portable electronic devices, such as e-books, tablets and smart phones, during taxi, takeoff and landing on domestic "mainline" flights. The move by Philadelphia's dominant airline, which transports nearly 70 percent of air travelers at Philadelphia International Airport, coincides with new policies instituted by Delta, JetBlue, American, and United airlines. Last week, the Federal Aviation Administration announced that passengers on U.S. airlines can leave their personal electronic devices on during all phases of flight.
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