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Electronics

ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2012
Jay-Z is no dummy. EDM - for electronic dance music - is the music buzz-phrase of 2012. At Made in America, rap-heads and rockers alike will hear the best in mostly non-American electronic dance music. Imagine how Skrillex 's hair will look in the Made in America movie! That Los Angeles-based DJ with the long black locks and shaved sides is the toast of the electro scene. His metallic beats and scorched-earth melodies live up to the acclaim. In terms of pop sensibilities, however, Skrillex doesn't hold a candle (yet)
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Mark Fazlollah, Mike Newall, Joseph A. Slobodzian, and Dan Hardy, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole said Saturday it was reviewing its policies on monitoring probation offenders after allowing accused cop-killer Rafael Jones to go without a required electronic ankle bracelet for up to two weeks after he was released from jail and placed on house arrest. Jones is accused of killing Police Officer Moses Walker Jr. on Aug. 18, 10 days after Jones walked free from a Philadelphia prison on an order from Common Pleas Judge Susan I. Schulman.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2012 | By Mae Anderson and Bree Fowler, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Best Buy's co-founder is looking to make a buy of his own, offering to take the electronics seller private only months after leaving as the company's chairman. Best Buy Co. said it would consider the offer but called it "highly conditional. " And analysts are skeptical that former Chairman Richard Schulze's opening offer of $24 to $26 per share would get a deal done and that it could be tricky to line up investment firms to help pay for it. It's the latest twist in the Minneapolis company's struggles to stay relevant as more people buy electronics online.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if solvent Germany stops bailing out Europe and goes back to its own, stronger money? That would make German products cost more. But privately owned German industrial-sensor and controls maker IFM Electronic GmbH won't have that problem. The company dedicated its new factory and labs in Malvern on Monday, and is adding more abroad. "We make eight million sensors a year," said Roger Varma , head of the $700 million (in yearly sales) company's IFM Prover USA Inc.me off the line at IFM's factory in Tettnang, Germany.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot and Daily News Staff Writer
A FORMER court administrator was charged Monday with allegedly stealing about $433,000 from the city over the course of 11 years, buying TVs, parking passes and other big-ticket items with court-issued credit cards and reselling them to friends.   Federal prosecutors said William Rullo, 47, of Levittown, who worked as a procurement technician for the First Judicial District until he was fired in 2010, bought electronics and other valuable goods on the court's dime for personal use, resold merchandise and falsified statements to cover his tracks.
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two men charged in the Jan. 14 beating death of Temple University graduate Kevin Kless during an early morning fight in Old City were granted reduced bail Monday by a Philadelphia judge. When they will be released, however, is an open question. Demand for electronic ankle bracelets that ensure that people on house arrest stay inside the house has sometimes outstripped supply, resulting in waits of weeks to months. Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner approved the reduction of the bail for Steven Ferguson, 21, from $500,000 to the $150,000 agreed upon by Assistant District Attorney Brendan O'Malley and defense attorney Stephen P. Patrizio.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With all his talk about sugar cane, corn, casaba, and fungi, Jeff White sounded like someone with a food obsession. But the ingredients he enumerated during an interview last week had to do with manufacturing, not a meal. His is an unconventional view of the world, where vegetables and other crops are the base materials for such durable goods as cellphone covers, DVD trays, and shipping containers. But the success of Ecospan L.L.C., the bioplastics company he now leads that aims to replace petroleum-based plastics with those made from natural resources, depends on White's perspective becoming widely held by consumers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: I have been with my boyfriend "Paul" for four years. We have a child together, and we each have a child of our own. We have lived together for three years. When I was pregnant with our son, Paul contacted an ex on a social network. One day he left his computer open, and I saw that their conversations were less than innocent. I said something immediately. We have stayed together, but I'm having a hard time trusting Paul. I now check our phone records. Yesterday I found a text of his to a former boss' daughter.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Patricia Anstett, DETROIT FREE PRESS
DETROIT — Five-year-old Annabelle Murphy of Sterling Heights, Mich., who was born without a left hand and forearm, doesn't consider her electronic arm anything out of the ordinary. Sensors tucked inside her arm charge three fingers on her hand that let her pick up jelly beans and uncap magic markers. She's learning to tie her shoelaces, no easy task for many kids her age. She can bat a ball and helps other kids open their fruit snacks if they have trouble tearing open the bag. A program at Children's Hospital of Michigan provides the prosthetic arms and hands and therapy to children who are uninsured or whose insurance doesn't fully pay for the devices.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Janet Woodcock, who leads the federal government's efforts in evaluating pharmaceuticals, said Wednesday in Center City that she hopes increased use of electronic health records will help doctors prescribe the right drugs, patients understand and follow their treatment plans, and regulators learn more quickly of problems with medicines after they enter the market. Woodcock said that regulators and pharmaceutical companies, which can spend 10 years and $1 billion to move a drug through the approval process, could better predict effectiveness of new drugs if there was a system for collecting data from real-world use of existing medicines.
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