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Elena Kagan

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NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
SHE'S BEEN rumored for weeks as President Obama's likely choice to replace retiring Justice John Paul Stevens on the Supreme Court, and yesterday Obama made it official by picking the administration's 50-year-old solicitor general, Elena Kagan, as his nominee. But, even though she's been all over the news cycle for 24 hours, there are still things you may not know about Kagan. Here are a dozen: 3. She is already giving Sen. Arlen Specter a giant headache! Back in February 2009, when the Pennsylvania senator was a Republican and gravely concerned about proving his bona fides to that party's right-wing primary voters, he joined 31 GOP colleagues in voting against Kagan as solicitor general in charge of arguing cases for the Obama administration before the Supreme Court.
NEWS
May 17, 2010 | By JOHN DICKERSON
ELENA KAGAN spent her first day on Capitol Hill last week meeting the senators who will vote on her nomination. One of them, Republican leader Mitch McConnell, took to the Senate floor to raise questions about whether she will be a captive of the White House she works for. "In our constitutional order, justices are not on anybody's team," McConnell said. "They have a very different role to play. As a Supreme Court justice, Ms. Kagan's job description would change dramatically.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
A commentary Tuesday misidentified the journal that published a 1995 article by Elena Kagan. It was the University of Chicago Law Review.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
Although the Senate Judiciary Committee's questioning of Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan has concluded, the committee will convene at 4 p.m. Thursday to hear from outside witnesses called by each party in support of or opposition to her confirmation.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
The Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings for Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan, which opened Monday, are expected to last much of the week and will be widely covered live on television and online.
NEWS
July 4, 2010
Brain Food, C2 Sally Schwartz Friedman: At Penn 50th reunion, women graduates look back at a world transformed. Pop quiz: July 4th speeches. Insights and Observations, C3 Dick Polman: Afghanistan policy and the antiwar left. Buzz Bissinger: Thinking about America from the vantage point of a first-century Philadelphia. Editorials, C4 The Senate should confirm Elena Kagan, President Obama's nominee to replace John Paul Stevens on the Supreme Court.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Comcast Corp. in a class-action lawsuit involving Philadelphia cable-TV customers who claimed they'd been harmed by the company's anti-competitive business practices. The decision overturned a decision by the Philadelphia federal courts to certify about two million Comcast cable-TV customers as a class to sue the cable company for $875 million in damages. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the opinion. He was joined by Justices John Roberts, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.
NEWS
August 13, 2009
MOST Philadelphians have no idea who Elena Kagan is. For all we know, she's never been to Philadelphia and she thinks Vinnie Fumo is the name of a character from "Guys and Dolls. " But Elena Kagan is an important person. She's the U.S. solicitor general, holder of a top position in the Justice Department. Yesterday, the U.S. Attorney's Office officially asked for Kagan's permission to file an appeal of Vince Fumo's 55-month travesty of a prison sentence. Kagan alone has the power in the next few months to decide whether the feds will pursue hard time for Vince or drop the matter and let his creampuff of a sentence stand.
NEWS
August 6, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
WASHINGTON - The Senate confirmed Elena Kagan as the nation's 112th justice of the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday in a largely partisan 63-37 vote. Kagan, 50, the U.S. solicitor general, replaces the retired Justice John Paul Stevens. Once she is sworn into office, the Supreme Court will include for the first time in history three sitting female justices. She will become the youngest justice to join the court since Clarence Thomas in 1991. After three days of debate on the Senate floor, five Republicans crossed party lines to vote for Kagan, with one Democrat opposing her. Kagan received five fewer votes than Justice Sonia Sotomayor one year ago. Republicans supporting Kagan included Sens.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014
SUPREME Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's polemic against the court's conservative majority decision in the Wheaton College case is as much a cry of frustration as it is a dissent. She criticizes the justices in a way the public seldom sees, saying in a blistering dissent, joined by Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Elena Kagan: "Those who are bound by our decisions usually believe they can take us at our word. Not so today. " The Wheaton ruling, issued July 3, said the Christian liberal-arts college in Illinois doesn't have to use federal Form 700 to meet the requirements for a religious exemption from providing contraceptive coverage.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A sharply divided Supreme Court decided Monday to make it harder for Americans to sue businesses for retaliation and discrimination, leading a justice to call for Congress to overturn the court's actions. The court's conservatives, in two 5-4 decisions, ruled that a person must be able to hire and fire someone to be considered a supervisor in discrimination lawsuits, making it harder to blame a business for a coworker's racism or sexism. The court then decided to limit how juries can decide retaliation lawsuits, saying victims must prove employers would not have taken action against them but for their intention to retaliate.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Comcast Corp. in a class-action lawsuit involving Philadelphia cable-TV customers who claimed they'd been harmed by the company's anti-competitive business practices. The decision overturned a decision by the Philadelphia federal courts to certify about two million Comcast cable-TV customers as a class to sue the cable company for $875 million in damages. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the opinion. He was joined by Justices John Roberts, Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
HERE'S CLOUT'S A-to-Z guide to the Democratic National Convention, which begins Monday in Charlotte, N.C. *  A is for Americans for Prosperity - The nonprofit linked to billionaire brothers David and Charles Koch pulled its ads attacking President Obama from Pennsylvania this week. Will the U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 ruling allowing unlimited fundraising for these types of ads move the needle against Obama in 2012? *  B is for Bump - Mitt Romney will be looking for the traditional bump in polling numbers coming out of the Republican National Convention this week.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
DENVER - Seeking to rally a crucial constituency, President Obama on Wednesday warned women in swing-state Colorado that Republicans would seek to strip away health-care benefits for them and cut funding for contraceptive services. In a pitch for his health-care overhaul, Obama sought to draw a contrast with Mitt Romney, saying his rival intended to take his health-care law and "kill it dead" on the first day of his presidency and "get rid" of Planned Parenthood. "They want to take us back to the policies more suited to the 1950s than the 21st century," Obama said.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - When Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. joined with the court's liberal justices to uphold President Obama's health-care law, it was historic in more ways than one: It was only the second time in his seven years on the court that he provided the winning vote for the left to prevail over the conservative justices. That statistic alone should be enough to cool hopeful chatter from some liberal political commentators that perhaps Roberts is showing signs of becoming the next David Souter.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a federal law making it a crime to lie about receiving the Medal of Honor and other prized military awards, with justices branding the false claim "contemptible" but nonetheless protected by the First Amendment. The court voted 6-3 in favor of Xavier Alvarez, a former local elected official in California who falsely said he was a decorated war veteran and had pleaded guilty to violating the 2006 law, known as the Stolen Valor Act. The law, enacted amid U.S. wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, was aimed at people making phony claims of heroism in battle.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Mark Sherman, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Here's a thought that can't comfort President Obama: The fate of his health-care overhaul rests with five Republican-appointed Supreme Court justices. If they stand together, his most sweeping domestic achievement could be struck down. But the good news for Obama is that he probably needs only one of the five to side with him to win approval of the law's crucial centerpiece, the requirement that almost everyone in this country has insurance or pays a penalty.
NEWS
November 15, 2011
By Arlen Specter Several Republican presidential candidates have vowed to rein in the Supreme Court and the rest of the federal judiciary if elected, presenting the latest in a series of such challenges from both the left and the right. Justice Antonin Scalia was chastised for speaking to the House Tea Party Caucus, and both he and Justice Clarence Thomas were criticized for associating with wealthy conservatives such as the Koch brothers, who stand to benefit from the court's decision to allow corporate campaign contributions.
NEWS
June 22, 2011
By Walter Olson In the run-up to the Supreme Court's opinion this week in Wal-Mart v. Dukes , the Ninth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals had given the go-ahead to a lawsuit on behalf of a vast number of female Wal-Mart employees, each of whom had supposedly suffered harm as a result of the giant retailer's way of doing business. In the minds of some advocates, the only question remaining was whether the Supreme Court would stand in the way of justice. Prejudging Wal-Mart's guilt without so much as a trial, the left-leaning Alliance for Justice asked: "Will the Supreme Court Protect Wal-Mart's Discrimination Against Women?"
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