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Elevator

NEWS
February 11, 1997 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Michael Shuler appears to be the kind of guy who would probably kill for a cigarette. Last Oct. 1, he almost did, said Assistant District Attorney Brian Grady. Shuler, 25, stabbed and wounded a probation officer and a security guard on an elevator in a building on Broad Street near Cherry after he was escorted from a fourth-floor probation office for smoking. Yesterday, Shuler, of Reese Street near Hunting Park Avenue, pleaded guilty to 16 charges, including two aggravated assaults, resisting arrest and weapons offenses.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
After more than a year of squabbling and delays by the Willingboro Board of Education, the John F. Kennedy Junior High School is still without a working elevator. In September 1989, the board voted to spend $173,300 to install an elevator in the school, a former high school that was transformed that year into a junior high. Michael Brown, a student who walks with crutches, needed the elevator to get from class to class in the tri-level building. The board was faced with the threat of losing more than $703,000 in federal funds if it did not make his classes more accessible to him. But, frustrated by the delays, Michael Brown and his family moved from the district in April.
NEWS
October 17, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
The buzzing sound of a malfunctioning elevator occasionally competed with voices from a press conference and rally yesterday on the 18th floor of the State Office Building at Broad and Spring Garden streets. Strangely - or maybe not so strangely - no one at the rally seemed to take notice of the buzzing down the hall. Workers in the building called for the public rally to draw attention to a number of hazards in the high-rise stone and glass building, particularly the elevator problems.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
One of the worst parts of urban life, as the sociologists call it, is riding in automatic elevators. The ride is all right. It is smooth and safe and free. But the silence gets a person. There is something strange about being sealed in a small room with a lot of other people without a word being spoken. The most anyone says to a stranger on an automatic elevator is: "Punch three, would you?" The rider who is asked to punch the button for somebody else's stop because he happens to be standing near the control panel always looks put upon.
NEWS
May 6, 1987 | By DEBBIE M. PRICE, Daily News Staff Writer
The graffiti-scarred elevator bounced and jarred but refused to open at the sixth floor. Democratic mayoral candidate Edward G. Rendell pulled at the door, but to no avail. The car was off again, not stopping until it reached the 15th floor of Building 1311 of the King Plaza public-housing project. "This always happens. You got to pull the door if you want to get out, and half the time the elevator don't run at all," said Louise Hanible, acting president of the King Plaza tenant council.
SPORTS
October 17, 1987 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was Oct. 19, 1986. World Series week. Andy MacPhail was walking toward the elevator of the Grand Hyatt hotel in New York. Little did he know that he was about to push the down button that would change the course of baseball. MacPhail is the general manager of the Minnesota Twins. His team had just finished another one of those spectacularly depressing seasons that it had become world-renowned for in recent years. The Twins had come roaring down the stretch to finish 71-91, barely sneaking by the Seattle Mariners in the final days to escape the skid row of baseball - the grungy basement of the American League West.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | by Jorge Fitz-Gibbon, Laura Fahrenthold and Don Singleton, New York Daily News
An act of everyday heroism led to tragedy yesterday in the Bronx. James Chenault, a veteran welfare clerk and Vietnam vet, was riding an elevator in his Bronx office building when it apparently stopped slightly above the second floor and the doors opened. As Chenault, 55, held the door open with his back to allow a woman to get off, a second woman got her foot caught as she tried to step off, and Chenault quickly moved to free her. He did, but while he was still in the doorway, leaning in, Car No. 1 lurched suddenly upward, the doors still open.
NEWS
April 4, 1988 | By Paul Meskil, New York Daily News
A 65-year-old man, who lost an eye and a lung as a result of a near-fatal mugging 10 years ago, fought off another mugger Saturday, wrenched the attacker's knife away and stabbed him to death in a fierce battle in the elevator of a Bronx apartment house. Juan Cedeno was attacked about 9 a.m. in an elevator in his building in the Mott Haven Houses project in the South Bronx, police said. The robber threw an arm around Cedeno's neck, held the knife to his throat and demanded money, investigators reported.
SPORTS
November 30, 2000 | By Jerry Brewer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Several Eagles got stuck in an elevator at Veterans Stadium for about 10 minutes yesterday. "I've got to get out of here," wide receiver Na Brown joked. "I've got to get out of the Vet. All I know is we pushed the button, the lights went out, and we all were stuck on the elevator with a dude who had a lot of mail. " The players on the elevator included wide receiver Todd Pinkston and offensive linemen Doug Brzezinski and Jermane Mayberry. There were also other team personnel on the elevator.
NEWS
June 3, 1986 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The $18 million Camden Transportation Center, which has been under construction in Camden, must include an elevator for the handicapped, according to a Superior Court judge's ruling released yesterday. "The legislature has mandated all plans and specifications for the construction and remodeling of public buildings shall provide facilities for the handicapped," Judge Paul A. Lowengrub wrote in a 15-page opinion. The Delaware River Port Authority and the management of its high-speed line, the Port Authority Transportation Co., had argued that because none of the other stations on the PATCO High-Speed Line is accessible to the handicapped, it would be impractical to build such an elevator only in the Camden Transportation Center.
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