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Elkins Park

NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Andrew Hussie, Special to The Inquirer
A Philadelphia man was charged with attempted rape and related charges after a patrol officer responding to a woman's screams interrupted an assault in a garage of the Lynnewood Gardens complex in Elkins Park early Friday morning. The woman, a 19-year-old Philadelphia resident, suffered a bruised face in the attack and was taken to Rolling Hill Hospital in Elkins Park for treatment, police said. Paul Randel, 34, of the 3700 block of Germantown Avenue, was arrested as he attempted to run from the scene after he saw the patrol car's headlights approaching the garage, police said.
NEWS
March 15, 2012 | By Anthony Campisi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elkins Park's tiny downtown has not been the same since Ashbourne Market closed in 2002. Tucked into a commercial strip just a few blocks long, the market was more than a grocery with a big kosher section. For four decades, it was the convivial hub of the community, where neighbors gathered over bagels and lox on Sunday mornings. Having lost their anchor, however, nearby stores began to falter. Others moved in - including a tasty shawarma joint - only to fail, too. The strip was so barren, said Max Minkoff, that "you couldn't buy an apple" there.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Evelyn "Evie" Berger of Elkins Park, a retired insurance executive, was named national president of the American Society for Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Berger, a society member since 1989 and the first woman to head the society in its 40-year history, assumes the leadership position halfway through a 10-year plan to raise $750 million for the school, sometimes called Israel's MIT. She served two terms as president of the society's national women's division, where she focused her efforts on scholarships, faculty recruitment and medical research.
SPORTS
January 18, 1999 | By Rick O'Brien, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Mike and Nancy Connelly began raising a family nearly two decades ago, they never imagined that their lives would one day revolve around the game of ice hockey. Maybe, they thought, one of their three children would take a liking to hockey and the others would develop interests that did not include lacing on skates, playing on frozen water, or being body-checked on a regular basis. Mike Connelly had played in amateur leagues in the area, but he wasn't what you would call a fanatic about the sport.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Bridgett M. Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a sobering occasion. When Michael Simon of Elkins Park received a proclamation from Mayor Goode last week, he realized that his ambitious effort to save thousands of lives was closer than ever to success. Simon, 19, has worked for the last three years to launch and promote Sober Drivers, a program to encourage individuals to take responsiblity for getting drunken and drugged drivers off the road. Goode has designated December as "Sober Drivers" month in Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 4, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Gina Frederick remembers the children who used to congregate idly around the apartment building where she lived in Chicago in 1996. Adrift and unsupervised, the children seemed in need of some meaningful activity. Frederick, a nature lover who had gone to the big city to work as a graphic artist, decided to intervene. "I thought, I can't ignore this," the Pipersville, Bucks County, resident recalled recently. "The needs of these kids were so important to me. " Frederick began taking the children to museums and other places "they wouldn't get a chance to see otherwise," she said.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Benton C. Epps, a retired investigator for the Department of Labor, died Tuesday. He was 63 and lived in Elkins Park. Epps retired in 1985 from the Labor Department's Philadelphia office, where he was assigned to investigate civil-rights complaints. He was hired in 1955 to be the first black investigator for the General Accounting Office in Washington, D.C., according to his wife, the former Peggy Tonkins. For the past 18 years Epps also owned the 1707 Tavern on Cecil B. Moore Avenue.
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | by Julia M. Chang, Daily News Staff Writer
If your dream house looks like a castle, includes five bedrooms, a grand spiral staircase and lots of French doors, but owning it remains a fantasy, $100 will buy you a chance to win, free and clear, the French-Norman style home an Elkins Park couple is raffling off at the end of July. "It's a phenomenal deal for whoever wins," said the owner, Michelle Ward, 29, who has lived there for 18 months with her husband, Monty, and their 7-year-old son. "It's a beautiful house. It's just too big for us. " The sprawling home, which sits on three-quarters of an acre, also boasts 31/2 bathrooms, central air conditioning, gas heat, a five-year-old roof and a 21/2-car detached garage.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | By Oliver Prichard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An 80-year-old Elkins Park woman has died of injuries suffered when her husband shot her in the head after mistaking her for a burglar, the Montgomery County coroner said yesterday. Grace Pritz was shot about 1 a.m. Tuesday in her living room by her husband, Joseph Pritz, 87, who then called 911. She was pronounced dead at 5:25 p.m. Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Joseph Pritz, whose mental capacities had diminished in recent years, has been committed to Norristown State Hospital and is not likely to be charged with a crime, Montgomery County First District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman said.
REAL_ESTATE
May 31, 2009 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber FOR THE INQUIRER
Brian Gralnick has always been civic-minded and community-oriented. He worked in local and state politics, then for the Pennsylvania Department of Aging in Harrisburg. When he returned to Philadelphia to pursue a master's degree in social policy at the University of Pennsylvania, he stayed with his parents for a time, and with a girlfriend in Center City. But after graduating, he took a job with the United Way and started to look for a home of his own right away. At top of his wish list: a house that was within walking distance of a train station; one that had long-term value; and a sense of community in the area.
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