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Elliott Lewis

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NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The unsuccessful bidder for a multimillion-dollar Philadelphia International Airport maintenance contract is suing the city to stop it from giving the work to a group of companies that includes one with ties to the mayor's brother, T. Milton Street. Elliott-Lewis Corp., which has run airport maintenance services for 11 years, lost the contract to a consortium of businesses that submitted the lowest bid for the airport maintenance work earlier this summer. In a complaint filed in Common Pleas Court, Elliott-Lewis argues that the new company, called Philadelphia Airport Services, does not have the ability to pull off the massive maintenance operation and was given special treatment by the city.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Elliott-Lewis Corp. makes money - $100 million in sales last year - being invisible. The mechanical-services contractor runs wires, repairs boilers, and maintains air-conditioning systems at the Pentagon, the Independence Blue Cross building, Philadelphia International Airport, and many other sites. "We're working in the back room," said Bill Sautter, the company's longtime chief executive. "As long as the building is cool, nobody notices you. " Now the heat is on. As part of the long-elusive labor pact reached July 14 at the Convention Center, Elliott-Lewis is responsible for doling out all the jobs - to freight movers, sign hangers, carpet layers - among the six trade unions that work in the building.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2004 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucking the Convention Center leadership and a federal judge, a labor-management committee said yesterday that union electricians had a right to stage a work protest at the center in June. The opinion by the electricians' Labor Management Committee, composed of three local electricians' union representatives and three electrical contractors, does not appear to be binding on the center. But the business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, John J. Dougherty, said he intended to use it to buttress his case today when he and the board discuss the dispute.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A large Houston airport-maintenance company is on track to lose more than $50 million worth of work at Philadelphia International Airport - work that it won five years ago with the help of the mayor's brother, T. Milton Street. The firm, Philadelphia Airport Services, yesterday submitted a bid $145,000 higher than the one from a Philadelphia rival, the Elliott-Lewis Corp. The bids, for maintenance work that includes cutting grass and fixing elevators, are for one of the city's largest contracts.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2004 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The powerful chief of Philadelphia's electricians' union conceded yesterday that his local "overreacted" last month in briefly shutting off power and picketing at the Convention Center. But John Dougherty's admission did not immediately settle rancor over his June 17 labor action, which had stirred so much fear of renewed discord at the center that Gov. Rendell and House Speaker John Perzel (R., Phila.) had interceded personally to try to calm the situation. Dougherty's admission came in a statement announcing a settlement in the dispute between Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the center's labor supplier, Elliott-Lewis Corp.
NEWS
December 22, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Houston-based company has lost $56 million worth of work at Philadelphia International Airport - work it won five years ago with the help of the mayor's brother, T. Milton Street Sr., who is now facing federal criminal charges in connection with that deal. As of March 1, Philadelphia Airport Services (PAS) will be replaced by a rival firm headquartered in Northeast Philadelphia, the Elliott-Lewis Corp., which submitted a lower bid to take over repairs to elevators and escalators, as well as other maintenance work for the next four years at the city-owned airport.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By William K. Marimow and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District will rebid a multimillion-dollar management contract for the district's Broad Street headquarters amid allegations of bid rigging on behalf of a minority-owned company. John L. Byars, the district's chief of procurement, was accused of seeking to steer the contract to U.S. Facilities Inc., a subsidiary of a minority firm founded by Willie F. Johnson, a former state and city official. In a Jan. 7 letter, former City Solicitor Carl E. Singley - who represents Elliott-Lewis Corp.
NEWS
September 26, 2001 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A suit against the city by a maintenance firm that lost a multimillion-dollar airport contract to a firm with ties to Mayor Street's brother has been dismissed. The ruling by Common Pleas Court Judge Albert W. Sheppard Jr. means that a consortium of businesses that was awarded the work can move ahead with taking over airport maintenance on Monday, when the one-year, $13.6 million contract takes effect. The joint venture, functioning under the name Philadelphia Airport Services, consists of the Houston-based Enron Building Services Inc. and two Philadelphia-based companies: U.S. Facilities Inc. and General Asphalt Paving Inc., which is owned by the family of Michael Meehan, counsel to Republican City Committee.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2003 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dave Gentile has spent the last 24 years working as an agent in the FBI's Philadelphia office. Now he is going in a different direction: He has been hired for the newly created job of director of labor services at the Convention Center. As of Oct. 7, Gentile will be the person charged with making sure the center's six trade unions comply with dozens of work rules contained in a much-publicized labor pact reached two months ago. "What I do or do not know about the hospitality industry is not relevant," said Gentile, 56, who is retiring from the FBI's Philadelphia office, where he spent his entire career.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission on Wednesday discussed extending the contract for managing the district's Broad Street headquarters through August to allow for new bids. As The Inquirer reported 10 days ago, district officials decided to recommend restarting the contracting process after reports of scoring irregularities and allegations of bid-rigging surfaced when the district tried a few months ago to award a new contract. The commission is scheduled to vote at its meeting next week on the resolution to pay Elliott-Lewis Corp.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union carpenters and Teamsters angling to regain their jobs at the Convention Center had their hopes thwarted Monday when a hearing examiner for the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board said the board did not have jurisdiction to handle a complaint filed by the two unions. The unions, which have been staging protests outside the Convention Center for months, lost the right to work there in May, when they did not sign a new customer-satisfaction agreement by a deadline set by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority board.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the top jobs open up at some of Philadelphia's most powerful public institutions, the politically appointed boards don't look too far for replacement bosses. Harrisburg lobbyist John McNichol was confirmed Wednesday by his fellow board members as the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority's chief executive officer, a position that will pay $220,000 per year, plus benefits. McNichol had been acting in the job since predecessor Ahmeenah Young was sent away last fall, when the board hired facilities manager SMG to handle day-to-day operations and negotiate new union contracts.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The main problem keeping more big shows from the Pennsylvania Convention Center is that too many customers don't feel they are getting value for all they pay under its current labor arrangements, consultant Public Financial Management Inc. (PFM) wrote in a recent report to the center's board, echoing earlier reports. If labor is the issue, why is the center's board recruiting private firms to replace its management? PFM credits the managers for bringing in more money and spending less than the center's budget.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center board of directors says it sought applicants from across the United States when it sent a "Request for Qualifications" last year, seeking private firms to show they could handle management, marketing, maintenance, and capital improvements at the sprawling, taxpayer-funded, under-used Center City complex. The firms that answered the call were all locally connected, say people familiar with the results. Two are already Convention Center contractors with specialized duties.
NEWS
February 10, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission on Wednesday discussed extending the contract for managing the district's Broad Street headquarters through August to allow for new bids. As The Inquirer reported 10 days ago, district officials decided to recommend restarting the contracting process after reports of scoring irregularities and allegations of bid-rigging surfaced when the district tried a few months ago to award a new contract. The commission is scheduled to vote at its meeting next week on the resolution to pay Elliott-Lewis Corp.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By William K. Marimow and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District will rebid a multimillion-dollar management contract for the district's Broad Street headquarters amid allegations of bid rigging on behalf of a minority-owned company. John L. Byars, the district's chief of procurement, was accused of seeking to steer the contract to U.S. Facilities Inc., a subsidiary of a minority firm founded by Willie F. Johnson, a former state and city official. In a Jan. 7 letter, former City Solicitor Carl E. Singley - who represents Elliott-Lewis Corp.
NEWS
December 22, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Houston-based company has lost $56 million worth of work at Philadelphia International Airport - work it won five years ago with the help of the mayor's brother, T. Milton Street Sr., who is now facing federal criminal charges in connection with that deal. As of March 1, Philadelphia Airport Services (PAS) will be replaced by a rival firm headquartered in Northeast Philadelphia, the Elliott-Lewis Corp., which submitted a lower bid to take over repairs to elevators and escalators, as well as other maintenance work for the next four years at the city-owned airport.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A large Houston airport-maintenance company is on track to lose more than $50 million worth of work at Philadelphia International Airport - work that it won five years ago with the help of the mayor's brother, T. Milton Street. The firm, Philadelphia Airport Services, yesterday submitted a bid $145,000 higher than the one from a Philadelphia rival, the Elliott-Lewis Corp. The bids, for maintenance work that includes cutting grass and fixing elevators, are for one of the city's largest contracts.
NEWS
December 30, 2005 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A controversial Philadelphia International Airport maintenance contract is about to be extended for a second time - reaping millions of dollars for a politically connected company that was once tied to Mayor Street's brother. The four-year, $50 million contract, held by Houston-based Philadelphia Airport Services since 2001, was set to expire Sept. 30. But it did not. City officials explained that because they were still studying the company's bid to renew the deal - a bid that was $2.3 million higher than that of the only other competitor - they were extending the old contract until the end of the year.
NEWS
October 8, 2005 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual move yesterday, Street administration officials announced they would toss out proposals from two competing companies for a $50 million airport maintenance contract, and instead call for new bids. The decision to start over gives a second chance to the company now doing the work - a company with ties to Mayor Street's brother - to hold onto the deal for another four years. Although no final decision had been made, that company, Houston-based Philadelphia Airport Services, had submitted a bid $2.3 million higher than its rival, Elliott-Lewis Corp.
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