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Ellis Island

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NEWS
July 5, 1992 | NEWSDAY
Bowing to protests from preservationists, the National Park Service has withdrawn plans to demolish 12 historic buildings on Ellis Island for a hotel and conference center. "We're going back to the planning stages," spokesman Manny Strumpf said Friday. The Center Development Corp. of New York had proposed a plan to build a $140 million hotel and conference center. Under the plan, 20 buildings on the island would be restored and 12 others, including a contagious-disease ward and a morgue, would be razed.
NEWS
October 29, 1991 | BY BASIL I. MERENDA
On a recent picture perfect autumn afternoon, I and my two brothers made a pilgrimage to discover our second-generation American roots that were set down over 85 years ago in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, on a small patch of land located in the middle of gritty New York Harbor, which is better known as Ellis Island. After walking through the great hall and viewing the various exhibits, I realized, to my surprise, that the Spirit of Ellis Island and the immigrant experience is just as relevant today in the 1990s, as our country prepares to meet the challenges of an uncertain global economic future, as it was at the turn of the century.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's chief immigration officer yesterday invited lawyers with immigration concerns to hold their 1992 convention on the now-abandoned southern end of Ellis Island. He was met with murmurs. The immigration chief said the abandoned end of Ellis could also become "an educational center, for foreign students when they come to this country, or for American students when they go abroad. "How about a week on Ellis Island?" for such students, he said. He was met with outright laughter.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morry Helzner was born in the Crimea shortly before the Russian Revolution. He left his homeland when he was only 7 - the same age as his grandson, who last week darted around the immaculate Helzner living room in Rhawnhurst. "I don't like that," Helzner, 76, said, a stern expression on his normally cheerful face. "If you want to be in here, sit and listen. " Andrew Levy obediently sat on the sofa next to his 10-year-old brother, Scott, who was already listening intently to the old man's memories.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | By Stephen Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
I heard that there's some sort of "castle" in New York where immigrants used to be processed before Ellis Island opened. Can you tell me where it is, and whether people can go to see it? The site, called Castle Garden at the time, was used as an immigrant landing depot from 1855 to 1890 (Ellis Island facilities opened in 1892) and processed more than eight million immigrants. It was originally constructed as a fort at the tip of Manhattan Island in the early 1800s to protect American ships from British attacks.
NEWS
June 29, 1986 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellis Island is really three islands, a symmetrical landfill in the Upper Bay, built atop a muddy mound with dirt and debris from the construction, a century ago, of Manhattan's earliest subways. They are small rectangles of land, less than 28 acres in all, clustered in the harbor's marshy tide-wash and connected at their corners around a narrow ferry channel - just a few thousand feet north of the Statue of Liberty. Between 1892 and 1954, but especially between the closing years of the 19th century and the opening salvos of World War I, Ellis Island's brooding cluster of buildings - some grand, some sinister - was the chief port of entry for an unprecedented tide of immigrants, more than 17 million people, most of them tired, many of them poor, all of them homeless and yearning.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | By Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The longstanding battle between New Jersey and New York over Ellis Island resumed yesterday with legal arguments before the nation's highest court on the question of which state has jurisdiction over a big chunk of the historic island. But after lawyers for each side used carefully measured words to highlight their respective points to the justices, the top law-enforcement official from each state took the fight outside - to the cameras that waited on the alabaster steps of the U.S. Supreme Court building.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
GETTING TO ELLIS ISLAND. Visitors to the newly reopened Ellis Island are having to cope with two problems. One is that the lines for the ferries are long; the other is that the new $6 cost of ferry tickets makes a trip to the island an expensive proposition, especially for families. There are two places to catch the Circle Line boats for the 10-minute ride to the Immigration Museum and other exhibits: Liberty State Park in Jersey City and Battery Park on Manhattan's southern tip. The lines have been so long that at times would-be visitors have been turned back in mid-afternoon.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five wooden benches stained dark brown. Stained, also, with dreams and fears and the perspiration of nations. They are benches from Ellis Island, that famous way station for immigrants, and they have been on loan to the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies since 1976. The benches have been part of Balch's educational program. Students sit on them, students learn about them. But late last year, the National Park Service, which is in the midst of refurbishing and reopening Ellis Island, said it wanted the benches back.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
Your grandma may have thought she stepped ashore in New York when she came to America, but the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that, in fact, there's a good chance she landed in New Jersey. By a 6-3 vote, the high court agreed with New Jersey's attorneys that the deed to most of Ellis Island - port of entry for 17 million immigrants from 1892 to 1954, and long declared an official landmark of New York City - should be moved across the river to the Garden State. New York will retain a crucial sliver of the island's 28 acres: the dock where boats from the city land, the museum that 2 million people visit each year and the ground in between.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
It's hard to think of a contemporary writer as quintessentially Philadelphian as Diane McKinney-Whetstone. The Chestnut Hill resident, who grew up in West Philadelphia, creates characters firmly rooted in the city and its neighborhoods, its parks and streets, its slums and mansions. Anchored by the city, her stories explore the nitty-gritty of life for ordinary people who live on either side of racial and class divides. Her best-selling 1996 debut, Tumbling , was set in South Philadelphia during the 1940s and '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015
Welly Wanging, anyone? Monday was a fun day for England's charitably minded, fun-loving royal trio. Prince Harry , the Duke of Cambridge (may we call him William ?) and Duchess Catherine ( Kate , to those who know and love her) showed up for a meeting of their Charities Forum, greeting dozens of kids from organizations they sponsor. The gathering took place at BAFTA, the British Academy of Film and Television, where the trio watched a 30-minute clip from the new "Shaun the Sheep" production "The Farmer's Llamas," sat down with kids to make mini Shauns and snowmen out of modeling clay, made a short film and took turns flinging a colorful children's rain boot at a gourd-shaped scarecrow head.
NEWS
February 2, 2015
ISSUE | DRONES End deadly strikes The media have done little to inform the public about the targeted killings the Bush and Obama administrations have orchestrated via lethal drones, especially in countries with which we're not at war, so it was commendable to report on the interfaith conference on drone warfare ("A conference considers the morality of drones," Jan. 25). The conference was attended by people of many faiths who called on the White House "to immediately halt targeted, lethal drone strikes," account for victims, disclose standards for compensating victims, and more.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sylvan Tobin, 83, of Haverford, a businessman and philanthropist, died Wednesday, May 29, of natural causes at his home. During a quarter-century as its president, Mr. Tobin transformed Fishman & Tobin Inc. from a small Philadelphia-based maker of boys' suits into a global player in the manufacture of children's products. The firm was cofounded by Mr. Tobin's father, Louis, in 1914. It is now a clothing conglomerate on Chemical Road in Plymouth Meeting. With his partner, Bernard Fishman, Mr. Tobin expanded the business to meet demand for youth-related goods at both ends of the spectrum, from Walmart to Nordstrom, said Mark Fishman, a copresident of the firm.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
To look at Pier 53 today, a thin finger of tree-covered land stretching into the tidal waters of the Delaware River, you would never guess that this was the front door to America for a million immigrants from Europe. From 1873 to 1915, steamships for the American Line dropped off steerage passengers from places like Italy, Poland, and Germany. From there, newcomers sought out relatives in South Philadelphia, or boarded the Pennsylvania Railroad for coal and steel towns to the north and west.
NEWS
March 12, 2013
AFTER THIS latest mess in Washington, all the politicians should be replaced ! No questions asked. But the American people lack the balls to do it. The American people bitch and moan and do nothing else. Replace them all and I would bet things would change in Washington. Grow your own dope - plant a politician. Steve Vogel Oxford, Pa. America is at a crossroads. We must decide whether this is to be a country that follows the wishes of the Founding Fathers or bows to the wishes of special-interest groups and millionaires.
TRAVEL
February 19, 2012 | By Beth J. Harpaz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Museums and historic sites, and a trendy new Tribeca restaurant inspired by an old-school Catskills resort. They're all part of Jewish New York, with a heritage that stretches back 400 years and a vital contemporary community that's reinterpreting old traditions for the 21st century. New York City has the largest concentration of Jews in the world outside of Israel, according to the Jewish Databank, which put the city's Jewish population at 1.4 million in 2002. The stories of European Jews who arrived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are relatively well-known and easy to find in places such as the Lower East Side.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
We've managed to acquire a remarkable family Hanukkah gift: a ship's manifest, an official passenger log that tracks my late mother-in-law's voyage to America in 1920. It's a taproot to family history, part of our clan's collective "Coming to America" story. Had she not made that voyage, nothing would be the same. Hinda Rubache came to these shores and through Ellis Island as a young woman of 22. She sailed from the city of Minsk in Russia, though her immigration papers say Poland because of the ever-changing borders.
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011
Planning a trip with the kids? Here is ShermansTravel.com's list of the best places to go. 1. Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, New York City 2. Fenway Park, Boston 3. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska 4. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona 5. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Fla. 6. San Diego Zoo, San Diego 7. The Smithsonian, ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Ellis Island figures in so many American family histories that any artist who addresses the last century's great wave of European immigration plugs into a ready-made constituency. So it is with the 28 striking color images, now on display at Doylestown's Michener Art Museum, that New York photographer Stephen Wilkes made at the immigrant gateway between 1998 and 2003. Wilkes worked not in the vast arrivals hall where the intrepid newcomers were processed but in the sprawling 29-building hospital complex.
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