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Ellsworth Kelly

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NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
After a few brief words of praise, the city Art Commission gave its unanimous blessing Wednesday to a soaring Ellsworth Kelly sculpture proposed by the Barnes Foundation for its new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "This was an easy one," said the architect Emanuel Kelly, a commission member (and no relation to Ellsworth Kelly). The commission's chairman, the painter Moe Brooker, lauded the Barnes for bringing high-profile attention to contemporary art. "I find that very exciting," he said.
NEWS
November 1, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The enormous, multicolored wall sculpture by Ellsworth Kelly that for decades peered through the plateglass front of the old Greyhound office building at 17th and Market Streets has been privately purchased and given to the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. The Kelly work - a staccato series of 104 anodized aluminium rectangles and curvy trapezoid panels strung out over 64 feet - became the first piece of abstract public sculpture in Philadelphia when it was commissioned (by architect Vincent Kling)
NEWS
April 12, 2012
A photo caption in Wednesday's Inquirer incorrectly identified artist Ellsworth Kelly, above, whose new work, The Barnes Totem , was installed Tuesday at the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. In Annette John-Hall's Tuesday column, the wrong date was given for the Score 4 Scholarships Basketball Tournament. The tournament is on Sunday, April 15. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
April 24, 2014
The newest jewel in the Philadelphia Museum of Art treasure trove is a 97-work collection that may tend toward minimalist tastes. But there's nothing bare-bones about its likely impact on the museum, its patrons, and the region's cultural landscape. Indeed, the decision by collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs to donate a substantial portion of their collection - whose acquisition poignantly represents a scrapbook of their 45-year marriage - requires a grand gesture in response. That came from museum officials this week with the renaming of the galleries of modern and contemporary art for the couple.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Art collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs, who have amassed one of the finest collections of contemporary work in the country, will donate the vast majority of it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, transporting that institution into the front ranks of large museums with holdings of late-20th and early 21st-century art. Museum director Timothy Rub called the gift of 97 works, to be announced Friday, transformational and placed it among the three greatest...
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The first two major sales of contemporary art since the Oct. 19 stock market crash produced mixed results Tuesday and Wednesday. Works by nine contemporary artists set sales records at Wednesday's auction at Sotheby's, but 64 works auctioned Tuesday at Christie's netted a disappointing total of $7.8 million, about $5 million less than the auction house's pre-sale estimate. Of the 64, 14 fetched bids below the reserve minimum set by the owners and therefore failed to sell. Sotheby's Wednesday sale brought in $17,661,600, reportedly the second highest total for a sale of contemporary art at auction.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
The past has come back to haunt us at the Barnes Foundation, big time. It returned this weekend in the form of a monumental mural by painter and sculptor Ellsworth Kelly called Sculpture for a Large Wall . Kelly created the mural in 1956-57 as a commission for the former Philadelphia Transportation Building at 17th and Market Streets. It's a landmark work of art, the first abstract sculpture in Philadelphia and a piece that looks as fresh and lively today as it did when it was installed in the building's lobby 56 years ago. The sculpture left Philadelphia in 1998 under circumstances that shocked the city's cultural community.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Shortly before 8 on Tuesday, with the long morning sunlight coming in low over the city, Ellsworth Kelly's The Barnes Totem finally settled into its permanent home outside the new gallery of the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway. The slanting sunlight caught the bead-blasted steel surface of the 40-foot sculpture, brightening its matted gray and propelling geometric shadows onto the limestone panels of the new Barnes building nearby. Gusty wind Monday had delayed the installation a day - no one, and certainly not the 88-year-old artist, wanted an eight-ton artwork swirling uncontrollably high above 20th and Callowhill Streets.
NEWS
May 7, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Let's just say, it didn't hurt that the two paintings at the start of the Museum of Art's blockbuster exhibition were of guys in their swim trunks, and the people on the audio guide jumped in talking about homosexuality and nipples. "Cezanne and Beyond," I salute you. You totally got the attention of my children. I could almost see the oxygen flooding to the brain of my sixth grader, who pointed out the nipple weirdness of Cezanne's The Bather moments before the guides in her ears did. And I could see the eighth grader punching the numbers into the audio set when moments before she had vowed not to. Hey, maybe Mom is taking us to something interesting this time?
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NEWS
April 24, 2014
The newest jewel in the Philadelphia Museum of Art treasure trove is a 97-work collection that may tend toward minimalist tastes. But there's nothing bare-bones about its likely impact on the museum, its patrons, and the region's cultural landscape. Indeed, the decision by collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs to donate a substantial portion of their collection - whose acquisition poignantly represents a scrapbook of their 45-year marriage - requires a grand gesture in response. That came from museum officials this week with the renaming of the galleries of modern and contemporary art for the couple.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Art collectors Keith and Katherine Sachs, who have amassed one of the finest collections of contemporary work in the country, will donate the vast majority of it to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, transporting that institution into the front ranks of large museums with holdings of late-20th and early 21st-century art. Museum director Timothy Rub called the gift of 97 works, to be announced Friday, transformational and placed it among the three greatest...
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
The past has come back to haunt us at the Barnes Foundation, big time. It returned this weekend in the form of a monumental mural by painter and sculptor Ellsworth Kelly called Sculpture for a Large Wall . Kelly created the mural in 1956-57 as a commission for the former Philadelphia Transportation Building at 17th and Market Streets. It's a landmark work of art, the first abstract sculpture in Philadelphia and a piece that looks as fresh and lively today as it did when it was installed in the building's lobby 56 years ago. The sculpture left Philadelphia in 1998 under circumstances that shocked the city's cultural community.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
An exhibition of wall sculptures by Ellsworth Kelly - including a large piece that once graced the old Greyhound terminal at 17th and Market Streets - will be presented at the Barnes Foundation from May 4 through Sept. 2, Barnes officials announced Thursday. It will be the first show of non-foundation works at the new Barnes on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The initial special exhibition included foundation works not regularly on public view. "We are thrilled to inaugurate our program of contemporary exhibitions with a presentation of works by Ellsworth Kelly, an acknowledged master of the 20th and 21st centuries," said Derek Gillman, Barnes president and director.
NEWS
April 12, 2012
A photo caption in Wednesday's Inquirer incorrectly identified artist Ellsworth Kelly, above, whose new work, The Barnes Totem , was installed Tuesday at the Barnes Foundation on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. In Annette John-Hall's Tuesday column, the wrong date was given for the Score 4 Scholarships Basketball Tournament. The tournament is on Sunday, April 15. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Shortly before 8 on Tuesday, with the long morning sunlight coming in low over the city, Ellsworth Kelly's The Barnes Totem finally settled into its permanent home outside the new gallery of the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway. The slanting sunlight caught the bead-blasted steel surface of the 40-foot sculpture, brightening its matted gray and propelling geometric shadows onto the limestone panels of the new Barnes building nearby. Gusty wind Monday had delayed the installation a day - no one, and certainly not the 88-year-old artist, wanted an eight-ton artwork swirling uncontrollably high above 20th and Callowhill Streets.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The artist Ellsworth Kelly was there. Joseph Neubauer, the Barnes Foundation vice chairman and donor extraordinaire, was also there. So were dozens of skilled movers, installers, crane operators, and art handlers. A swarm of project managers and members of the Kelly entourage talked and looked on in the shadow of a giant yellow crane angling from the parking lot of the Barnes' new gallery on the Parkway. They had all turned out Monday morning, waiting, as the artist put it, to "bring something back to Philadelphia" - a monumental sculpture by Kelly, his 40-foot-high, eight-ton, stainless steel The Barnes Totem . The Neubauer Family Foundation made the acquisition possible for the Barnes and, as Joseph Neubauer said, for "everyone in the city passing by. " It is the first public work installed here by Kelly, 88 and an undisputed master of American art, since his massive Transportation Building Lobby Sculpture was quietly removed from the old Greyhound office building on Market Street and sold in 1996.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
After a few brief words of praise, the city Art Commission gave its unanimous blessing Wednesday to a soaring Ellsworth Kelly sculpture proposed by the Barnes Foundation for its new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "This was an easy one," said the architect Emanuel Kelly, a commission member (and no relation to Ellsworth Kelly). The commission's chairman, the painter Moe Brooker, lauded the Barnes for bringing high-profile attention to contemporary art. "I find that very exciting," he said.
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