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Ellsworth Kelly

NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
An exhibition of wall sculptures by Ellsworth Kelly - including a large piece that once graced the old Greyhound terminal at 17th and Market Streets - will be presented at the Barnes Foundation from May 4 through Sept. 2, Barnes officials announced Thursday. It will be the first show of non-foundation works at the new Barnes on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The initial special exhibition included foundation works not regularly on public view. "We are thrilled to inaugurate our program of contemporary exhibitions with a presentation of works by Ellsworth Kelly, an acknowledged master of the 20th and 21st centuries," said Derek Gillman, Barnes president and director.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
To say art has dominated the lives of Keith and Kathy Sachs is to say the sun shines during the day. Throughout 47 years of marriage, the Sachses have been dedicated collectors of modern art. Since the 1980s, they have focused their attention on the art of their time. In 2014, the Sachses announced that they would give the bulk of their art to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. What that transformational gift will mean to the museum will be on view beginning Tuesday, when "Embracing the Contemporary: The Keith L. and Katherine Sachs Collection" opens for a run through Sept.
NEWS
December 2, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
An exhibition of wall sculptures by Ellsworth Kelly - including a large piece that once graced the old Greyhound terminal at 17th and Market Streets - will be presented at the Barnes Foundation from May 4 through Sept. 2, Barnes officials announced Thursday. It will be the first show of non-foundation works at the new Barnes on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The initial special exhibition included foundation works not regularly on public view. "We are thrilled to inaugurate our program of contemporary exhibitions with a presentation of works by Ellsworth Kelly, an acknowledged master of the 20th and 21st centuries," said Derek Gillman, Barnes president and director.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | John Timpane
Here are a few outstanding museum and gallery shows you should not miss this summer. Creative Africa (Through Sept. 25, Philadelphia Museum of Art) This big show is simply a revelation - the visionary work of artists throughout Africa, from contemporary photography, fashion, and architecture to centuries-old sculpture. Also programs, artist talks, family festivals, and community conversations. (215-763-8100, philamuseum.org ) Daylight Harmony: Larry Francis (Through June 30, Gross McCleaf Gallery)
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Watching hundreds of people gather around his wife at the Philadelphia Museum of Art the other night, 69-year-old Gene Gladstone thought about all the evenings he and Kaki had poured some wine and talked about their days. Gene, a lawyer, would take a minute or two to sum up his workday. "The rest of the night, she'd entertain me with hers," he said. And why wouldn't Kaki Gladstone have endless stories to tell, after 45 years working in volunteer services at the museum, the last 28 as head of a department that has 686 volunteers of one sort or another?
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
After a few brief words of praise, the city Art Commission gave its unanimous blessing Wednesday to a soaring Ellsworth Kelly sculpture proposed by the Barnes Foundation for its new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "This was an easy one," said architect Emanuel Kelly, a commission member. The commission's chairman, painter Moe Brooker, lauded the Barnes for bringing such high-profile attention to contemporary art. "I find that very exciting," he said. The Kelly sculpture, a slender stainless steel blade rising 40 feet, was commissioned and donated to the Barnes by the Neubauer Family Foundation.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Dancer and choreographer Joan Myers Brown, the founder of Philadanco and a commanding presence in the world of dance and arts education, and Laurie Olin, whose landscape-architecture firm is responsible for revitalizing the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and many other public spaces in the city, have been named recipients of the National Medal of the Arts, the White House announced Wednesday. In announcing the 12 winners of the nation's highest civic honor for excellence in the arts, President Obama cited Brown, 80, for carving out "an artistic haven for African American dancers and choreographers to innovate, create, and share their unique visions with the national and global dance communities.
NEWS
January 23, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In moments of sorrow, some like to send flowers. The museum world sends art. Starting just weeks after the death in June of Philadelphia Museum of Art director Anne d'Harnoncourt, the museum began receiving paintings, drawings and other items given in her memory. Among the gems: a small Georges Seurat oil on wood donated by Jacqueline Matisse Monnier, granddaughter of Henri Matisse; a Frank Stella painting from Museum of Modern Art president emerita Agnes Gund; and a colored-pencil drawing by Claes Oldenburg given by friend of four decades Marion Boulton Stroud, founder of the Fabric Workshop and Museum.
NEWS
September 8, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In death as in life, she got them to look at art. And to Anne d'Harnoncourt last night, they said thank you and good-bye. About 2,000 friends, colleagues and admirers gathered at the Academy of Music for a warm and polished tribute to d'Harnoncourt, the longtime Philadelphia Museum of Art director whose death from a heart attack June 1 shook the local arts community and the tight-knit international art establishment. The event, held on what would have been her 65th birthday, may not mitigate the kind of grief and dismay that has gripped the Art Museum in the last few months, but it does draw down an unofficial curtain on a summer of mourning.
NEWS
November 10, 1998
Little did Philadelphians know, but the recent fight to save the Dream Garden mosaic was actually Round Two in the struggle to preserve privately owned artwork that's on public display. And Round One was a loss by knockout. More than a year before casino mogul Steve Wynn eyed Dream Garden, another work - the sprawling Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture that, for decades, graced a downtown lobby - was purchased, carted off, resold and then donated to New York's Museum of Modern Art. The story of the Kelly sale, unearthed only now, is another wake-up call - as is the disturbing news, arrived last week, that there's still a "For Sale" sign on the Dream Garden.
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