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Ellsworth Kelly

NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Watching hundreds of people gather around his wife at the Philadelphia Museum of Art the other night, 69-year-old Gene Gladstone thought about all the evenings he and Kaki had poured some wine and talked about their days. Gene, a lawyer, would take a minute or two to sum up his workday. "The rest of the night, she'd entertain me with hers," he said. And why wouldn't Kaki Gladstone have endless stories to tell, after 45 years working in volunteer services at the museum, the last 28 as head of a department that has 686 volunteers of one sort or another?
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Dancer and choreographer Joan Myers Brown, the founder of Philadanco and a commanding presence in the world of dance and arts education, and Laurie Olin, whose landscape-architecture firm is responsible for revitalizing the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and many other public spaces in the city, have been named recipients of the National Medal of the Arts, the White House announced Wednesday. In announcing the 12 winners of the nation's highest civic honor for excellence in the arts, President Obama cited Brown, 80, for carving out "an artistic haven for African American dancers and choreographers to innovate, create, and share their unique visions with the national and global dance communities.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
After a few brief words of praise, the city Art Commission gave its unanimous blessing Wednesday to a soaring Ellsworth Kelly sculpture proposed by the Barnes Foundation for its new site on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. "This was an easy one," said architect Emanuel Kelly, a commission member. The commission's chairman, painter Moe Brooker, lauded the Barnes for bringing such high-profile attention to contemporary art. "I find that very exciting," he said. The Kelly sculpture, a slender stainless steel blade rising 40 feet, was commissioned and donated to the Barnes by the Neubauer Family Foundation.
NEWS
January 23, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In moments of sorrow, some like to send flowers. The museum world sends art. Starting just weeks after the death in June of Philadelphia Museum of Art director Anne d'Harnoncourt, the museum began receiving paintings, drawings and other items given in her memory. Among the gems: a small Georges Seurat oil on wood donated by Jacqueline Matisse Monnier, granddaughter of Henri Matisse; a Frank Stella painting from Museum of Modern Art president emerita Agnes Gund; and a colored-pencil drawing by Claes Oldenburg given by friend of four decades Marion Boulton Stroud, founder of the Fabric Workshop and Museum.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The celebrated architect Frank Gehry, who at 85 is just one year younger than the Philadelphia Museum of Art, visited the city Thursday to kick off a special exhibition detailing his plans for expanding the iconic museum building. While he has worked on the project for a decade, the museum is only now unveiling the design, which involves carving out a block-size space under the east terrace to create a new wing of galleries. Most of the improvements will be out of public view, except for two controversial proposals.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
"THAT IS the last goddamn straw!" roared Dr. Albert C. Barnes.The long-dead Dr. Barnes was complaining about the stark, stainless-steel sculpture commissioned to "grace" the exterior of the new Barnes Foundation Museum that is racing toward a May 19 opening (in time for the tourist season). The sculpture, by Ellsworth Kelly, is a 40-foot Popsicle stick with a zigzag center. "It looks like a giant middle finger held up to torment me," growled the ghost of the cremated Dr. Barnes.
NEWS
September 8, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
In death as in life, she got them to look at art. And to Anne d'Harnoncourt last night, they said thank you and good-bye. About 2,000 friends, colleagues and admirers gathered at the Academy of Music for a warm and polished tribute to d'Harnoncourt, the longtime Philadelphia Museum of Art director whose death from a heart attack June 1 shook the local arts community and the tight-knit international art establishment. The event, held on what would have been her 65th birthday, may not mitigate the kind of grief and dismay that has gripped the Art Museum in the last few months, but it does draw down an unofficial curtain on a summer of mourning.
NEWS
November 10, 1998
Little did Philadelphians know, but the recent fight to save the Dream Garden mosaic was actually Round Two in the struggle to preserve privately owned artwork that's on public display. And Round One was a loss by knockout. More than a year before casino mogul Steve Wynn eyed Dream Garden, another work - the sprawling Ellsworth Kelly wall sculpture that, for decades, graced a downtown lobby - was purchased, carted off, resold and then donated to New York's Museum of Modern Art. The story of the Kelly sale, unearthed only now, is another wake-up call - as is the disturbing news, arrived last week, that there's still a "For Sale" sign on the Dream Garden.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
An abstract painting by Jasper Johns, expected to fetch no more than $2 million, sold for $3.63 million at Sotheby's galleries, setting what Sotheby's said was a record for a work by Johns, for any contemporary artwork at auction and for any living artist. The 1959 work, an encaustic-and-newspaper collage titled Out the Window, was purchased by an anonymous telephone bidder. "Collectors are willing to pay this kind of price because true masterpieces such as Out the Window are few and far between," said Lucy Mitchell-Innes, Sotheby's expert on contemporary art. The collage was one of nine paintings consigned by New York taxi-fleet heiress Ethel Scull, who battled her ex-husband, Robert, for 11 years in divorce court over possession of their extensive collection of contemporary art; she won title to Out the Window after a coin toss.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | By Greg McCullough and Ralph Vigoda, FOR THE INQUIRER
A specialist with the FBI met with Lower Merion police yesterday to discuss the investigation of what police say may be the largest art theft ever on the Main Line. Paintings worth approximately $900,000 were taken last week from a home at 1100 Ginkgo Lane in Gladwyne, police said. Works by Salvador Dali, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselman and Ellsworth Kelly are among the items reported stolen. The Kelly canvas, measuring 9 feet by 9 feet, is valued at $500,000, according to a Lower Merion police report.
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