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Elmore Leonard

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In more than one way, good things have come a little late for Elmore Leonard, who, deservedly, is the reigning king of American crime novelists. For one thing, Leonard, who is now in his 60s, had to wait for the world to catch up with him. For most of the 1970s, he had a devout cult following for the unforgettable villains and sleazes he served up in such novels as City Primeval. Then Leonard caught on in a big way with a larger public when he published Glitz. Many of his early loyalists found it ironic that as Leonard found a wider audience, his fiction lost some of its zest and originality.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
By Elmore Leonard William Morrow. 263 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by David Hiltbrand It probably qualifies as ironic: Elmore Leonard, who has never made a secret of his disdain for screen adaptations of his work, writing a novel based on a TV show, Justified , that is built around one of his fictional characters. Of course, the revered crime author has a vested interest here. He's an executive producer of the series on FX. But while this may be an unusually structured tale for Leonard, it's hardly a disappointment.
NEWS
November 10, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
After watching Universal and Burt Reynolds turn his hilarious novel Stick into so much cinematic kindling, through a botched editing job that is already a legend in the industry, Elmore Leonard might understandably have elected to forget Hollywood rather than forgive it. Although his name remained as one of the credited screenwriters for Stick, Leonard disowned it. But since Stick had no trace of those special qualities of dialogue and character that...
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
'If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it. " That, says Elmore Leonard, is the rule that sums up his famous "Ten Rules of Writing," a sort of manifesto in miniature on behalf of the plain style (sample: "Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip"). Leonard has written 45 novels, starting with The Bounty Hunters in 1953. About half of them have made it to the New York Times' best-seller list, including his latest, Raylan . Seventeen have been made into films, sometimes more than once, most notably 3:10 to Yuma (two versions)
NEWS
January 20, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Avern Cohn is a distinguished federal judge in Michigan. Except in Elmore Leonard's new novel, Mr. Paradise, where he's a sleazy ambulance chaser who serves as the agent for a pair of bargain-basement hit men. Chances are the jurist won't be suing the author for defamation. After all, Cohn paid to have his name used in a Leonard novel at an annual fund-raiser in Detroit. That arrangement tells you a great deal about Leonard, the dean of American crime writers. First of all, he's prolific and disciplined enough to build a yearly event around.
LIVING
June 20, 1999 | By Michael Harrington, FOR THE INQUIRER
Summertime, getaway time. A time to relax, head for the beach or the backyard, get some sun, take it easy. You'll need the right equipment, of course: a good paperback book, and maybe sunscreen. We can't think of anything else. Allow us to suggest some choice paperbacks to slip into that tote. (We'll leave the choice of sunscreen up to you.) The great Elmore Leonard takes a break from the petty criminals of Miami's South Beach and returns to his roots as a western writer with Cuba Libre (Dell, $7.50)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* JUSTIFIED. 10 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   ONE WAY or another, TV's waving goodbye to Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant) tomorrow, and all I'm hoping at this point is that he'll be waving back. My limited appetite for violence notwithstanding, I've loved (almost) every minute of the six seasons of "Justified," FX's Elmore Leonard-inspired drama about a trigger-happy deputy U.S. marshal who can't escape his upbringing in hardscrabble Harlan County, Ky. Here are 10 reasons: 10. Patton Oswalt's Constable Bob Sweeney.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
* JUSTIFIED. 10 tonight, FX.   PASADENA, Calif. - You don't replace Mags Bennett with just anyone. As FX's "Justified" returns tonight for its third season, the backwoods Machiavelli who won Margo Martindale an Emmy is, sadly, gone for good - but far from forgotten - and U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant) is facing a whole new set of challenges. Including two bad guys played by actors from executive producer Graham Yost's former critical darling, "Boomtown," Neal McDonough - who suits up to play a dapper Detroit gangster - and Mykelti Williamson, a local operative with his own not entirely clear agenda.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Long before he became what's been called "the high priest of hardboiled crime fiction," Elmore Leonard wrote westerns. Some would say he has never stopped writing westerns, but more on that later. In the early 1950s, when the easiest way for an aspiring novelist to break in was to write for pulp magazines that paid 2 cents a word, Leonard took advantage of the then-burgeoning market for horse operas and pounded out lean, mean tales of bounty hunters, calvary riders and cattle barons.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Elmore Leonard's book-to-movie ratio is remarkably high - the staggeringly productive scribe has seen 17 of his novels and short stories adapted for TV and cinema screens. Here's a list of the eight best Leonard-based movies, in chronological order. (My favorite: Out of Sight , with George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez.) 3:10 to Yuma (1957) Taut western with Glenn Ford as the outlaw, Van Heflin as a deputized rancher trying to get him on a train to prison - alive. Hombre (1967)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raylan Givens has the best lawman swagger since John Wayne. You can sense his Sig Sauer-strapped stride - tall, mythic - enter the room almost before he walks into a building. Created on the page by iconic crime novelist and raconteur Elmore Leonard, but only truly brought to life by Timothy Olyphant, the deputy United States marshal   will take his last steps and draw his last semi-auto pistol 10 p.m. Tuesday on the series finale of FX's Justified after six seasons. Justified came out at just the right time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* JUSTIFIED. 10 p.m. tomorrow, FX.   ONE WAY or another, TV's waving goodbye to Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant) tomorrow, and all I'm hoping at this point is that he'll be waving back. My limited appetite for violence notwithstanding, I've loved (almost) every minute of the six seasons of "Justified," FX's Elmore Leonard-inspired drama about a trigger-happy deputy U.S. marshal who can't escape his upbringing in hardscrabble Harlan County, Ky. Here are 10 reasons: 10. Patton Oswalt's Constable Bob Sweeney.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
OCCASIONAL Philadelphian Terrence Howard is in hot water again after being slapped with a restraining order sought by his ex-wife, Michelle Ghent . TMZ.com reported that Michelle claims that Terrence beat her up in Costa Rica last week, and she showed up in court with a black eye to "prove" it. Terrence is now forbidden from coming within 100 yards of Michelle until the couple is back in court for another hearing later this month....
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Elmore Leonard's book-to-movie ratio is remarkably high - the staggeringly productive scribe has seen 17 of his novels and short stories adapted for TV and cinema screens. Here's a list of the eight best Leonard-based movies, in chronological order. (My favorite: Out of Sight , with George Clooney and Jennifer Lopez.) 3:10 to Yuma (1957) Taut western with Glenn Ford as the outlaw, Van Heflin as a deputized rancher trying to get him on a train to prison - alive. Hombre (1967)
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
'If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it. " That, says Elmore Leonard, is the rule that sums up his famous "Ten Rules of Writing," a sort of manifesto in miniature on behalf of the plain style (sample: "Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip"). Leonard has written 45 novels, starting with The Bounty Hunters in 1953. About half of them have made it to the New York Times' best-seller list, including his latest, Raylan . Seventeen have been made into films, sometimes more than once, most notably 3:10 to Yuma (two versions)
NEWS
February 19, 2012
By Elmore Leonard William Morrow. 263 pp. $26.99 Reviewed by David Hiltbrand It probably qualifies as ironic: Elmore Leonard, who has never made a secret of his disdain for screen adaptations of his work, writing a novel based on a TV show, Justified , that is built around one of his fictional characters. Of course, the revered crime author has a vested interest here. He's an executive producer of the series on FX. But while this may be an unusually structured tale for Leonard, it's hardly a disappointment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2012
* JUSTIFIED. 10 tonight, FX.   PASADENA, Calif. - You don't replace Mags Bennett with just anyone. As FX's "Justified" returns tonight for its third season, the backwoods Machiavelli who won Margo Martindale an Emmy is, sadly, gone for good - but far from forgotten - and U.S. Marshal Raylan Givens (Timothy Olyphant) is facing a whole new set of challenges. Including two bad guys played by actors from executive producer Graham Yost's former critical darling, "Boomtown," Neal McDonough - who suits up to play a dapper Detroit gangster - and Mykelti Williamson, a local operative with his own not entirely clear agenda.
NEWS
February 13, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
FILLMORE, Calif. - East of the I-5, Henry Mayo Drive swings past Valencia Travel Village, clotted with hundreds of trailers and RVs, where the snowbirds stay in winter. Then it skirts the Chiquita Canyon Landfill and its huge earth movers and compactors, organizing garbage into mountains. Migrants work the lettuce fields as the road changes counties, crossing from Los Angeles to Ventura, and changes its name to Telegraph Road. You're traveling to a wondrous land whose boundaries are those of imagination.
NEWS
January 20, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Avern Cohn is a distinguished federal judge in Michigan. Except in Elmore Leonard's new novel, Mr. Paradise, where he's a sleazy ambulance chaser who serves as the agent for a pair of bargain-basement hit men. Chances are the jurist won't be suing the author for defamation. After all, Cohn paid to have his name used in a Leonard novel at an annual fund-raiser in Detroit. That arrangement tells you a great deal about Leonard, the dean of American crime writers. First of all, he's prolific and disciplined enough to build a yearly event around.
NEWS
January 20, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elmore Leonard's unique rogues' gallery and his unrivaled ear for dialogue make his work a natural for the movies. But before his lowlifes began getting the screen treatment they deserved, fans put up with some films more worthy of criminal prosecution than Leonard's villains. If you want to sample the better Leonard-inspired movies, stay away from Charles Bronson toiling as a watermelon farmer in 1974's Mr. Majestyk (PG, . ) and Burt Reynolds trashing Leonard's Stick (R, 1/2)
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