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Elvis Presley

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Sweet little Lucy de Barbin says she can't believe so many people are attacking her autobiography, "Are You Lonesome Tonight" ($15.95, Villard Books). The romantic melodrama recounts a secret, 24-year on-and-off relationship de Barbin claims to have had with the late, great King of Rock and Roll, Elvis Presley. Complicating matters, de Barbin says her affair of the heart produced "a daughter Elvis never knew," Lucy's offspring Desiree. This pretty, flat- faced woman of 28 does bear a marked resemblence to Presley - down to the deep tan and dyed-black hair affected by both.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1990 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
The deification of Elvis Presley gets a well-deserved puncturing in a quirky little cassette from Rhino Home Video called Elvis Stories (30 minutes, $14.95). True believers, who will be celebrating the King's birthday Monday, are cautioned to avoid this program at all costs. Styled after the supermarket tabloids that have made Presley's likeness a weekly fixture on the newsstands, the tape contains six Elvis-centered segments that mock our national obsession with the hillbilly rocker.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
George F. Di Domizio, 77, of Green Lane, a longtime Merck employee and friend of Elvis Presley, died Friday of esophageal cancer at Rockhill Mennonite Community. He was 77. Mr. Di Domizio was the first quarterback of the Lansdale Catholic High School football team and a member of the school's first graduating class, in 1953.He earned a bachelor's degree from Ursinus College. Mr. Di Domizio worked for Merck for 35 years, starting as a mail boy and eventually rising to become director of creative services before retiring in 1992.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By Laura Spinale, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Joe Esposito lifted Elvis Presley off the floor of the Graceland bathroom, he realized the King was dead. Presley's tongue protruded from his mouth, his jaw was stiff, his complexion blue. That was Aug. 16, 1977. Now, Esposito, Presley's road manager and best man, has decided to peddle part of his collection of Elvis memorabilia. The items, which he says "have been sitting in the back of my closet, not doing anyone any good," will be auctioned this fall at the Heritage Collectors' Society in Doylestown.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
COMPELLING documentaries about musical artists living, dead and questionable - U2, the Doors, Phil Ochs and Elvis Presley - have our eyes and ears this week. Also on deck: Tim McGraw's happiest heart tuggers, Seal's soul-stirred kiss-offs, Dion's trip to bluesville and a strong solo set from the Weakerthans' John Samson. Elvis sighting! The guy sitting in the dark sure sounds like Elvis. And in the singular moment where he allows his face to be lit on camera, looks as we'd imagine the King would, were "Elvis Found Alive" (Highway 61 Entertainment/MVD, B)
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Rhythm-guitar player John Wilkinson, 67, who performed with Elvis Presley more than a thousand times, died of cancer Friday at home in Springfield, Mo. Mr. Wilkinson met Elvis Presley at age 10 after sneaking into the singer's dressing room before a show in Springfield. He amused Presley when he told him, "You can't play guitar worth a damn. " After that meeting, Mr. Wilkinson developed a name for himself as a singer and guitarist, performing with such groups as the New Christy Minstrels.
NEWS
August 16, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PETER TOBIA
Sharon Hren waits to pay tribute to the "King. " She was waiting outside of Graceland, Elvis Presley's mansion in Memphis, yesterday for a candlelight vigil marking the 20th anniversary of Presley's death. She had been waiting for the evening program since 6:30 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
"Elvis Presley is very much alive and well in Memphis, Tenn. " - Marshall Murdaugh, President of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau August, 1987 Elvis lives! say his fans. Just a figure of speech, of course. But what if it were true? What if Elvis were alive and well today? Better make that just "alive. " He might not be so well. After all, he wasn't well at all 10 years ago, which is why he's no longer with us. Elvis Presley would be 52 now. When he was 42, he was suffering from a heart condition, high blood pressure, insomnia, obesity, and the multiple bad effects of stuffing himself with drugs.
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | By BRUCE BRITT, Los Angeles Daily News
Thanks to "digitalizing" - a process in which electronics are used to make old, noisy tapes cleaner-sounding, and moldy recordings are given the sparkle of new ones - audiophiles are lapping up digital versions of their favorite golden music. And, as one might guess, digitalization has revived interest in a lot of vintage recordings. RCA Records currently is digitalizing some of Elvis Presley's greatest live concert performances for a 1988 "Essential Elvis" series. Among the scheduled releases: "Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii," "Elvis at Madison Square Garden" and "G.I.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
On 2012's Lonesome Dreams and 2015's Strange Trails , traveling storyteller Ben Schneider - the Lord of the indie band Lord Huron - makes victory laps around Lake Wobegon with detours through the surf of Laguna Beach, the silt of the Colorado River, and the dust of the Oklahoma panhandle. There is an ambience of location - real and psychedelically imagined - and the nuanced detail of mystical experience to all that Huron does, with just a hint of hip-shimmying Elvis Presley in Schneider's vocal delivery.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN SALVATORE Giusti arrived in the Caribbean islands of Turks and Caicos to visit his daughter in September 2006, he discovered that a World Series of Poker tournament was scheduled. Salvatore considered himself a fair poker player, having sharpened his skills at the Tropicana in Atlantic City, and when he was asked to join the tournament as an amateur, he couldn't say no. The tournament ran for three days, and Salvatore came out No. 30, out of 100 amateurs. "He was very proud of that," said his daughter Antoinette Sottak, who lived in Turks and Caicos for 13 years.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
"I THINK WHAT Kanye West is going to mean is something similar to what Steve Jobs means. I am undoubtedly, you know, Steve of Internet, downtown, fashion, culture. Period. By a long jump. I honestly feel that because Steve has passed, you know, it's like when Biggie passed, and Jay-Z was allowed to become Jay-Z. I've been connected to the most culturally important albums of the past four years, the most influential artists of the past 10 years . . . I got the answers. I understand culture.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
When the artist formerly known as Dolores Hart attended the Academy Awards in 2012, it was her third time on the red carpet and the first time she didn't fret about what to wear. She wore black - her nun's habit, a crisp white wimple framing her radiant face. On a recent sultry July afternoon in Philadelphia, she demonstrates the garment's versatility. It has built-in ventilation, says Mother Dolores, 74, gentling her hem to circulate cool air. Over her headpiece she sports a jaunty black beret.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Terry Spencer, Associated Press
MIAMI - Country singer Slim Whitman, 90, the high-pitched yodeler who sold millions of records through ever-present TV ads in the 1980s and 1990s and whose song saved the world in the film comedy Mars Attacks! , died Wednesday at a Florida hospital. Mr. Whitman died of heart failure at Orange Park Medical Center, his son-in-law, Roy Beagle, said. Mr. Whitman's tenor falsetto and ebony mustache and sideburns became global trademarks - and an inspiration for countless jokes - thanks to the TV commercials that pitched his records and that he called "one of the smartest things I ever did. " But he was a serious musical influence on early rock, and in the British Isles, he was known as a pioneer of country music for popularizing the style there.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, TENN. - Gordon Stoker, a member of the Jordanaires vocal group that backed Elvis Presley, died Wednesday. He was 88. His son Alan told the Associated Press that Stoker died at his home in Brentwood, Tenn., after a lengthy illness. Stoker, who was born in Gleason, Tenn., got his start playing the piano on WSM radio and its signature show, the Grand Ole Opry. Alan Stoker said his father was just 15 when he started playing professionally. He joined the Jordanaires as a piano player, but then became tenor vocalist.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
Gordon Stoker, 88, a member of the Jordanaires vocal group that backed up Elvis Presley, died Wednesday at his home in Brentwood, Tenn., after a lengthy illness, his son, Alan, told the Associated Press. Mr. Stoker, who was born in Gleason, Tenn., got his start playing the piano on WSM radio and its signature show, The Grand Ole Opry . He joined the Jordanaires as a piano player, but then became a tenor vocalist. The quartet originated in Missouri and went to Nashville, where it backed Red Foley on a segment of the Opry called "the Prince Albert Show.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
Rhythm-guitar player John Wilkinson, 67, who performed with Elvis Presley more than a thousand times, died of cancer Friday at home in Springfield, Mo. Mr. Wilkinson met Elvis Presley at age 10 after sneaking into the singer's dressing room before a show in Springfield. He amused Presley when he told him, "You can't play guitar worth a damn. " After that meeting, Mr. Wilkinson developed a name for himself as a singer and guitarist, performing with such groups as the New Christy Minstrels.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Recording sessions have the mystique of making music history behind closed doors. No matter that the single most famous one in pop culture - the December day in 1956 when Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Carl Perkins, now known as the Million Dollar Quartet, were all in the same Memphis studio - yielded nothing of great musical consequence. It was lions at play, singing gospel and blues that the public didn't want to hear from them. But who wouldn't have wanted to be a fly on that wall?
NEWS
August 23, 2012 | By Angela Greiling Keane, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - As Homer Simpson would say, "D'oh!" The Postal Service guessed that the TV cartoon character and his family were twice as popular as Elvis Presley when it came to sales of commemorative stamps. In a move that wasted $1.2 million in printing costs, the service produced one billion of The Simpsons stamps and sold 318 million. The Postal Service inspector general in a report singled out the overproduction of stamps marking the 20th anniversary of the cartoon's run as an example of failing to align stamp production with demand.
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