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Emancipation Proclamation

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The National Park Service, in partnership with the National Park Foundation's African American Experience Fund, has launched Expressions of Freedom, a nationwide artistic competition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed in 1863. The contest, open to students 13 to 18 years old, will be juried by professional artists in three categories — photography, poetry, and digital short films. The first-place winner in each category will receive a $2,500 academic scholarship; the second-place winner will receive a $1,000 academic scholarship.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
In this month marking the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, here's a look at slavery around the world. Match the nation with the year it abolished slavery. 1. Brazil. 2. China. 3. Haiti. 4. Iran. 5. Korea. 6. Mauritania. 7. Portugal. 8. Russia. 9. Saudi Arabia. 10. Zanzibar. a. 1723; serfs in 1861. b. 1761. c. 1804. d. 1888. e. 1894. f. 1897. g. 1906. h. 1928. i. 1962.
NEWS
July 18, 1986
I disagree with the July 4 editorial saying that Marion G. "Pat" Robertson has disqualified himself from becoming president because he doesn't accept the dictates of the U.S. Supreme Court as the final word on what policies are prohibited or mandated by the Constitution. Recalling the circumstances in which President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation demonstrates the flaw in your editorial. The Emancipation Proclamation flatly contradicted the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision.
NEWS
June 19, 2006 | Guy Ciarrocchi
Guy Ciarrocchi lives in Paoli Today, June 19, all Americans should pause, reflect and celebrate. On June 19, 1865, 30 months after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston. He claimed U.S. sovereignty over the Texas territory and formally read the Emancipation Proclamation. Texas was the last place in America to learn of the president's order, and "Juneteenth" is the name of the celebration that followed.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
By A'Lelia Bundles On April 25, 1864 - 15 months after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863 - Annie Davis sent this letter to the White House: Mr. President It is my Desire to be free. To go to see my people on the eastern shore. My mistress wont let me. You will please let me know if we are free. And what I can do. I write to you for advice. Please send me word this week. Or as soon as possible, and oblidge.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Grant Calder
Mitt Romney's travails in the Republican primaries and President Obama's constant sparring with Congress have helped my students appreciate how hard it is to stick to your guns if you're trying to lead either of the two main political parties. Succeeding at "big tent" politics requires a sense of timing and flexibility. Some may call the latter "flip-flopping," but only when their opponents do it. Considering historical examples, the class decided no president or presidential candidate ever played this game for higher stakes, or better, than Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
When documents and manuscripts signed by President Abraham Lincoln come up for auction, the bidding is fierce and the prices are high. Last month at Sotheby's in New York, collectors and dealers bid aggressively, both in the salesroom and by telephone, and set records in specific categories for three choice Lincoln items. A draft of a Lincoln address sold for $236,500, a document signed by Lincoln went for $182,500 and a Lincoln letter for $82,500. However, the $236,500 for the draft of Lincoln's address to the Army of the Potomac - the sale's highest-priced item - fell below the record for any piece signed by Lincoln, the $297,000 paid for a souvenir copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
February 9, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The National Constitution Center has obtained a rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln, that will go on display next week and be part of the center's collection for the next 10 years. The printing is one of the so-called Leland-Boker editions of the proclamation, produced in 1864 for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair to raise money for sick and wounded Union soldiers. Forty-eight copies were made; 22 are known to be still in existence, with four held by other institutions in the city.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Civil Rights were 100 years apart, but both changed the nation and expanded freedoms. The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is presenting a walk back in time through two eras. A new exhibition, "Changing America," parallels the 1863 emancipation of slaves with the 1963 march. An inkwell Lincoln used to draft what would become the Emancipation Proclamation is on display on one side of the timeline, while the pen President Lyndon Johnson used to sign the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is on the other.
NEWS
July 23, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They say it's about freedom. And about pride. And about time. Since the 1970s, activists in historic LaMott have been trying to erect a memorial to honor the Emancipation Proclamation's original author, Edward M. Davis, an abolitionist whose mother-in-law was Lucretia Mott, the village's namesake. The idea never got off the ground. Until now. Having recently won the approval of one township committee, the Citizens for Restoration of Historical LaMott are poised to build the long-anticipated Emancipation Memorial Park on a vacant lot at Cheltenham Avenue and Keenan Street.
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NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a time when economic and civil rights issues are at the forefront in the news, the National Urban League will hold its annual conference in Philadelphia, marking key anniversaries in African American history. The theme of the group's conference, which runs from Wednesday through Saturday at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, is "Redeem the Dream: Jobs Rebuild America. " The event marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, at which the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech, and the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.
TRAVEL
February 3, 2013 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Civil Rights were 100 years apart, but both changed the nation and expanded freedoms. The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture is presenting a walk back in time through two eras. A new exhibition, "Changing America," parallels the 1863 emancipation of slaves with the 1963 march. An inkwell Lincoln used to draft what would become the Emancipation Proclamation is on display on one side of the timeline, while the pen President Lyndon Johnson used to sign the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is on the other.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
By A'Lelia Bundles On April 25, 1864 - 15 months after Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1, 1863 - Annie Davis sent this letter to the White House: Mr. President It is my Desire to be free. To go to see my people on the eastern shore. My mistress wont let me. You will please let me know if we are free. And what I can do. I write to you for advice. Please send me word this week. Or as soon as possible, and oblidge.
NEWS
January 13, 2013
In this month marking the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, here's a look at slavery around the world. Match the nation with the year it abolished slavery. 1. Brazil. 2. China. 3. Haiti. 4. Iran. 5. Korea. 6. Mauritania. 7. Portugal. 8. Russia. 9. Saudi Arabia. 10. Zanzibar. a. 1723; serfs in 1861. b. 1761. c. 1804. d. 1888. e. 1894. f. 1897. g. 1906. h. 1928. i. 1962.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
I WENT to Gettysburg over the weekend, embarrassingly for the first time. I say "embarrassingly" because, given the fact that I've spent a half-century in this state, you would think I'd have taken the time to visit the most sacred and famous battleground in the nation. I'd urge anyone who has yet to stand on that hallowed ground to make the trip, especially this year as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of both the Emancipation Proclamation and the battle. There is the sense, looking out over the now-quiet fields, that while America was born at Valley Forge and Bunker Hill, the crucible of Gettysburg forged its conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The National Park Service, in partnership with the National Park Foundation's African American Experience Fund, has launched Expressions of Freedom, a nationwide artistic competition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed in 1863. The contest, open to students 13 to 18 years old, will be juried by professional artists in three categories — photography, poetry, and digital short films. The first-place winner in each category will receive a $2,500 academic scholarship; the second-place winner will receive a $1,000 academic scholarship.
NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Grant Calder
Mitt Romney's travails in the Republican primaries and President Obama's constant sparring with Congress have helped my students appreciate how hard it is to stick to your guns if you're trying to lead either of the two main political parties. Succeeding at "big tent" politics requires a sense of timing and flexibility. Some may call the latter "flip-flopping," but only when their opponents do it. Considering historical examples, the class decided no president or presidential candidate ever played this game for higher stakes, or better, than Abraham Lincoln.
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
With so much already on his mind, the repetitious signing of 48 identical printed documents must have seemed tedious. But the souvenir copies of the Emancipation Proclamation awaiting Abraham Lincoln's signature at the White House were going for a good cause. The president dutifully scribbled his name across the bottom of each one in 1864, then traveled to Philadelphia's Great Central Fair, where the iconic documents were sold for the benefit of wounded Union soldiers during the Civil War. They went for $10 apiece.
NEWS
June 23, 2009 | By Mary L. Hagy and Dianne L. Semingson
Philadelphia is sitting on a gold mine of history, and it's not just the Revolutionary kind. Our region's Civil War assets are so rich that they present a major opportunity for the city's tourism coffers. A 2006 report funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts revealed more than 600 Civil War-related locations here. Together, they tell the story of our city as the industrial, medical, military, educational, and charitable engine that drove the Union victory at Gettysburg and nationally.
NEWS
February 9, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
The National Constitution Center has obtained a rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by Abraham Lincoln, that will go on display next week and be part of the center's collection for the next 10 years. The printing is one of the so-called Leland-Boker editions of the proclamation, produced in 1864 for sale at the Philadelphia Great Central Sanitary Fair to raise money for sick and wounded Union soldiers. Forty-eight copies were made; 22 are known to be still in existence, with four held by other institutions in the city.
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