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Embargo

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NEWS
January 23, 1996 | By Wayne S. Smith
On New Year's Day, Fidel Castro began his 37th year in power, even as conventional wisdom in the United States predicted his imminent downfall. Rep. Robert G. Torricelli (D., N.J.), for example, assured us in December 1992 that, as the result of his just-enacted Cuban Democracy Act further tightening the U.S. embargo, Castro would fall "within weeks. " In Miami, groups of Cuban exiles have now drawn up blueprints for the reconstruction of the Cuban economy "in the post-Castro period.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
Lucius Walker, 80, a pastor who led an annual pilgrimage of U.S. aid volunteers to Cuba in defiance of Washington's near half-century-old trade embargo, died Tuesday of a heart attack in New York. Mr. Walker headed the nonprofit Pastors for Peace, which since 1992 has sent tons of supplies donated in the United States to Cuba - goods ranging from walkers and wheelchairs to computer monitors and clothing.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Don Melvin and Geir Moulson, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - European Union foreign ministers announced Monday that they were keeping current sanctions against Syria in place for three months, rejecting attempts to alter an embargo on the country so that arms could be funneled to rebels fighting President Bashar al-Assad. However, in an apparent nod to Britain, which had argued that the rebels should be exempted from the embargo, the ministers adopted a nonspecific amendment "so as to provide greater nonlethal support and technical assistance for the protection of civilians.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Owen Ullmann, Mark Thompson and Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush is considering tougher measures to enforce the worldwide economic embargo against Iraq, including an expansion of sanctions against countries that violate the embargo and an increased show of force by U.S. warships, administration officials said yesterday. Talk of new steps to ensure compliance with the U.N. embargo was raised during a White House meeting with members of Congress even as the administration was saying that the boycott was working and Iraqi President Saddam Hussein charged that "the children of Iraq are dying" as a result.
NEWS
July 6, 2000 | By I. Felipe Alvarez
As a proud anti-communist Cuban-American, I was torn apart politically and morally by the power struggle for Elian Gonzalez. As a father, my heart tells me a boy belongs with his dad. As a "Peter Pan" kid who immigrated alone at age 12, sent by my parents to escape Fidel Castro's brainwashing, I am reminded that, in Cuba, the family is only a "breeding unit" of the regime and the way to get ahead is by being a mindless puppet of the power...
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | BY VICTORIA BROWNWORTH
Embargo. These days it's a keystone of the Clinton administration's foreign-policy efforts. This week, the State Department considers dropping the embargo on Haiti. And while the talks have resumed this week with Cuban officials, the U.S. embargo there remains in effect as well. As long as it does, Cubans by the thousands will continue their attempts to flee to U.S. shores. Not everyone is trying to leave Cuba, nor wants to. Most Cubans agree, however, that the embargo is creating terrible hardships for the island nation.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | By Lucinda Fleeson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When an international trade embargo was imposed against Haiti last year, medicine and food were supposed to be exempt from the sanctions. But now, almost a year later, Simphar Bontemps, a surgeon and hospital director, can't get critical medical supplies to keep patients alive. In the impoverished countryside, gasoline shortages have kept CARE food trucks from reaching starving villagers. Children often get enough food for only one meal a day, and there is none for their parents to share.
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | by Karen Love, New York Times
"Six is way too young," said the American businessman, laughing, on a flight this summer from Cuba to Mexico. "Twelve is the youngest I'd take . . . maybe 11, but 6 is too young. " The man was probably 35 to 40 years old. He had a good haircut, expensive casual clothes and a gold wedding band on his left ring finger. He was talking about prostitutes in Cuba. If I hadn't overheard their conversation so clearly, I would have guessed that they were six business associates returning from a golf vacation.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | By Jackie Koszczuk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Key members of the House reached an agreement in principle last night on legislation that would ease the 40-year-old economic embargo against Cuba. House Republican leaders met into the night with lawmakers on both sides of the highly emotional issue in an effort to work out differences on a bill that would relax restrictions on exports of food and medicine to Cuba. The legislation also would loosen sanctions against Iran, Libya, North Korea and Sudan. House Appropriations Committee Chairman C.W. Bill Young (R., Fla.)
NEWS
June 6, 1992
In the early days of the Haitian coup that ousted democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, economic isolation seemed a reasonable alternative to an armed invasion by the Organization of American States. Yet, after eight months, it is becoming painfully clear that a well-intended embargo meant to force the army out of power has only driven the Haitian poor to desperation. Too many of these people, unable to find work or the basics of life, are fleeing the island on patched and overcrowded boats to avoid unbearable poverty and political violence.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - A majority of Cuban Americans, whose opposition to the Communist regime in Cuba helped cement a 50-year U.S. trade embargo, now support normalizing trade relations between the two countries, according to a poll taken since President Obama's call for closer ties in December. The survey of 400 Cuban Americans by pollsters Bendixen & Amandi International, Miami, done in mid-March after the community had had three months to debate the new policy, showed 51 percent approved of Obama's call to end the embargo and improve trade relations, and 40 percent against.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jumping on the interest generated by President Obama's new policy on Cuba, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania said Tuesday that it would conduct a conference April 1 in New York City for companies and executives interested in doing business in the Caribbean nation. "This is going to be a really big change for the entire region, and a historic change for relations between the United States and Cuba," said Mukul Pandya, editor-in-chief of Knowledge@Wharton , who will host the Cuba Opportunity Summit.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiffany Manuel, a hostess at Cuba Libre, an Old City restaurant, was working Wednesday when President Obama announced historic steps to normalize relations with Cuba after a half-century of acrimony and isolation. Manuel welcomed the news. "Everything needs to change. If it ain't broke, don't fix it? They need to fix it," said Manuel, 32, whose father was born in Cuba and whose mother is African American. The policy changes, which include reopening a U.S. embassy in Havana, reconsideration of Cuba's designation as a state sponsor of terrorism, prisoner releases, and restructuring of rules on travel, remittances, and business exchanges, set off strong reaction on all sides.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
LONDON - A day after securing an end to the European Union's weapons embargo on Syria, Britain and France are facing criticism from Russia, and pressure at home and abroad, to show restraint before acting to arm the rebels seeking to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Britain, along with France, scored a diplomatic victory in Paris on Monday, effectively blocking an attempt by other European nations to extend the regional embargo that has prevented them from sending weapons to help the Syrian opposition.
TRAVEL
April 29, 2013 | By Val Proudkii, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Clarinets, reedy and thin, played something I'd never heard before. The low whine hung like humidity up and down narrow Consulado Avenue in Old Havana. I cocked my ear and detected the music coming from somewhere upstairs, through windows of a decaying, Spanish colonial-looking apartment building within sight of the national opera house. Brightening with each step as I drew closer, the sound wove an unforgettable sonic tapestry somewhere between laughing klezmer and the noble shriek of bagpipes.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Cynthia Tucker
" Wanna give me jail time and a fine "Fine, let me commit a real crime. " - Jay-Z, "Open Letter" If pictures tell the tale, Beyonce and Jay-Z had a marvelous time on their recent trip to Cuba, where they were trailed by starry-eyed fans. According to press accounts, they were forced to cut short a tour of Havana's old city because they were surrounded by a swarm of thousands, and their security guards got nervous. That just goes to show you that Fidel Castro's efforts to wall off the island nation from his powerful enemy to the north have failed.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Don Melvin and Geir Moulson, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - European Union foreign ministers announced Monday that they were keeping current sanctions against Syria in place for three months, rejecting attempts to alter an embargo on the country so that arms could be funneled to rebels fighting President Bashar al-Assad. However, in an apparent nod to Britain, which had argued that the rebels should be exempted from the embargo, the ministers adopted a nonspecific amendment "so as to provide greater nonlethal support and technical assistance for the protection of civilians.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Peter Orsi, Associated Press
HAVANA - When it started, American teenagers were doing "The Twist. " The United States had yet to put a man into orbit around the Earth. And a first-class U.S. postage stamp cost 4 cents. The world is much changed since the early days of 1962, but one thing has remained constant: The U.S. economic embargo on communist-run Cuba, a near-total trade ban that turned 50 on Tuesday. Supporters say it is a justified measure against a repressive government that has never stopped being a thorn in Washington's side.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Henry Chu and Paul Richter, Tribune Washington Bureau
LONDON - Europe slapped a boycott on Iranian oil Monday, signaling that the Islamic Republic's second-largest market is likely to dry up as part of a U.S.-led campaign of sanctions that has already inflicted serious damage on Iran's economy and sharply increased tensions. The value of Iran's currency is falling dramatically, prices are rising and Iranians are stocking up on supplies in fear of worse to come. Iran, which earns an estimated 70 percent of its revenue from oil sales, has threatened to retaliate by choking off the flow of oil through the Strait of Hormuz at the southern end of the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Don Melvin and Raf Casert, Associated Press
BRUSSELS, Belgium - European Union foreign ministers failed Thursday to reach an agreement on an oil embargo against Iran - a measure that some argued would have choked off funding for Iran's alleged program to develop nuclear weapons. But the ministers, incensed by a mob's attack Tuesday on the British Embassy in Tehran, did impose a new round of sanctions targeting dozens of people, groups, and businesses in the country. The ministers also imposed new sanctions on Syrian individuals and businesses to pressure the regime there to halt its deadly crackdown on antigovernment demonstrations.
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