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Emergency Department

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NEWS
February 16, 2001 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mercy Health System plans to start construction next week on a $4 million project to approximately double the size of the Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital emergency department to ease overcrowding. The hospital needs the enhanced facility to handle an increasing number of patients arriving for emergency care, said Mark T. O'Neil Jr., the system's president and chief executive officer. With the additional eight beds called for in the expansion plan, for example, the department would not have had to go on "divert status" yesterday morning, said Beverly Gribben, emergency-department nurse manager.
NEWS
May 21, 2007 | By Scott Pruden
If you need evidence of how much the western Main Line is growing that doesn't involve housing statistics, just look at its hospitals. Paoli Memorial, Bryn Mawr, Phoenixville and Chester County Hospitals are all on the cusp of major expansions and renovations to improve services, modernize facilities, and, most of all, make room for exponential increases in emergency-department visits and patient admissions. Paoli, for example, is on track to add 126 private patient rooms, expand its emergency department, and add 14 operating rooms.
NEWS
September 28, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Joseph Morelli's medical history popped up on her computer screen early one Sunday this month, Meg Greene, a nurse case manager in Bryn Mawr Hospital's emergency department, immediately recognized that he might benefit from her specialty: palliative care. Greene is part of a small but growing group of medical providers who say many patients in emergency departments are not appropriate for the all-out rescue medicine these units are designed to deliver. Instead, they are suffering from the pain and inexorable decline of cancer and chronic illness or old age, and may be better served by care aimed at comfort, not cure.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Mary Blakinger INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An $87 million project to dramatically upgrade clinical and lobby facilities at Lankenau Hospital here is poised to begin moving from drawing board toward reality this year. An estimated $75 million for this construction, initially announced last summer when officials outlined their strategic plan, will come from the nonprofit Lankenau Foundation, which supports hospital programs. The rest is to come from fund-raising and revenues. Officials also want to add a fifth and sixth floor to Lankenau's four-story Pew wing, to house an additional 94 in-patient beds.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will run Lancaster General Hospital's 19-bed pediatric unit and provide pediatric support in the emergency department starting July 1, Lancaster General and CHOP said Tuesday. CHOP's deal to provide inpatient serivces will replace a deal with the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital that expires July 1. CHOP cardiologists will also provide services to inpatients and outpatients at Lancaster General.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Einstein Healthcare Network's new hospital in Montgomery County has all the bells and whistles one would expect in a new medical center: Wall-to-wall windows, separate WiFi networks for staff and visitors, and all private rooms. But among the most carefully thought-out areas of the facility, opening Saturday and called Einstein Medical Center Montgomery, is a set of eight rooms next to the emergency department. That's where Einstein will treat patients who do not qualify for inpatient admission according to insurers, including Medicare, but who need to be observed for up to 48 hours.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
The Philadelphia VA Medical Center is about to undergo a huge face-lift - and quite a few nips and tucks, too. About 40 renovation and construction projects totaling $40 million are scheduled to unfold at the West Philadelphia center, on University Avenue near Baltimore Avenue, during the next 18 months, said Dale Warman, a spokesman for the Philadelphia VA. Chief among the projects is a $6 million remodel of the center's emergency department, which...
NEWS
July 26, 2012
Aria Health is planning a $37 million expansion of the emergency department at its Torresdale campus with the help of a $3 million grant from Pennsylvania's Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program, the health system's chief executive said Wednesday. The project, which will increase the size of the Torresdale emergency department to 42 beds from 30 beds, is slated for completion in March 2014, Aria's CEO Kathleen Kinslow said at a news conference. A year ago, Aria-Torresdale completed a $9 million, 25 percent expansion of its parking garage, also with the help of state money.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2008 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Catholic Health East New Jersey has agreed to build an emergency department at Deborah Heart and Lung Center that the two hospital organizations expect will serve 10,000 to 20,000 patients a year over the next three years. The department, expected to open Jan. 1, 2010, will be operated by Lourdes Medical Center of Burlington County, a Catholic Health East affiliate in Willingboro. Lourdes and Deborah, in Browns Mills, are 21 miles apart. John Ernst, Deborah's president and chief executive officer, said his hospital saw a need for more emergency care in the region, especially as nearby Fort Dix and McGuire Air Force Base have grown.
NEWS
January 3, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the weather turned warmer and then colder again late last month, the emergency department at Chester County Hospital was getting busier. "We are beginning to see a lot of respiratory infections ... the children are brought in over the weekends, the adults come in during the week," said Anne-Marie Guthrie, an emergency department educator at the hospital. The increase in patient volume, said Teresa Rougeaux, hospital spokeswoman, is due to two factors: the growth of Chester County and the increase in the elderly population.
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BUSINESS
May 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will run Lancaster General Hospital's 19-bed pediatric unit and provide pediatric support in the emergency department starting July 1, Lancaster General and CHOP said Tuesday. CHOP's deal to provide inpatient serivces will replace a deal with the Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital that expires July 1. CHOP cardiologists will also provide services to inpatients and outpatients at Lancaster General.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By James Roberts, M.D., For The Inquirer
As the morning paper stated, the Grateful Dead were about to perform an eagerly awaited concert that night. For some Grateful Dead aficionados, a little LSD is often taken before the concert. So the local physicians were all prepared for an onslaught of concertgoers high on LSD. The local poison control center reported the facts to the local media that LSD is a common drug, readily obtained, and it produces agitation, confusion, bizarre movements, hallucinations, and sometimes violence.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Stacey Burling and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last week's shooting at an outpatient office on the campus of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital was a reminder that the healing professions can be surprisingly dangerous. Organized nurses and emergency doctors have complained for years about violence at work that is common and frightening but that won't grab headlines like the case in which a patient opened fire, killing a caseworker before he was stopped by a psychiatrist who had his own gun and returned fire. "People get frustrated because everybody pays attention to this particular incident, but don't realize that . . . nurses and other health-care providers are victims of violence every day," said Deena Brecher, president of the Emergency Nurses Association.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Patty DiRenzo read about the heroin overdose cases in Camden that made headlines over the weekend, she thought, "Oh, no. " Summer is here, and overdose cases in hospital emergency rooms tend to increase, according to statistics kept by the state Department of Health. DiRenzo, whose son, Sal Marchese, died of a heroin overdose in a parked car in North Camden in 2010, has since been on a quest to save those in similar situations. DiRenzo, of Blackwood, was a big advocate of the Good Samaritan Emergency Response legislation, which Gov. Christie signed into law on May 2. The law, which went into effect immediately, gives immunity to drug users who call 911 for help when someone has overdosed or needs immediate medical attention.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2013
St. Mary Medical Center, in Langhorne, said it will build a $20.5 million, 50-bed acute rehabilitation hospital in partnership with Centerre Healthcare Corp., of Nashville, Tenn.   The new rehabilitation facility will go up on the site of the former Neshaminy Middle School across the street from St. Mary's main campus.   When the new facility is completed next spring, St. Mary will convert its existing 31 bed rehabilitation unit into one with private rooms for patients in the main hospital, St. Mary said.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - From the Rocky Mountains to New England, hospitals are swamped with people with flu symptoms. Some medical centers are turning away visitors or making them wear face masks, and one Allentown, Pa., hospital set up a tent outside its emergency room to deal with the feverish patients. Flu season in the United States has struck early and, in many places, hard. While flu normally doesn't blanket the country until late January or February, it is already widespread in 40 states, with about 30 reporting some major hot spots.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Male pedestrians at risk More than twice as many men as women die in pedestrian-vehicle accidents. Now researchers have partly determined why. Writing online last month in the journal Injury Prevention, investigators considered the contribution of three factors: distance walked, number of accidents, and fatalities per accident. Researchers using data from a variety of sources found that men and women walk similar distances and that men are involved in slightly more accidents per mile.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The decision by federal and state regulators to oppose Reading Health System's proposed $43 million purchase of the physician-owned Surgical Institute of Reading suggests that a provision of the Affordable Care Act could keep health expenditures higher than they need to be. The Federal Trade Commission and the Pennsylvania attorney general announced Friday that they would sue to block the deal. Reading Health System said Monday that the deal had been terminated to avoid an expensive court fight.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Einstein Healthcare Network's new hospital in Montgomery County has all the bells and whistles one would expect in a new medical center: Wall-to-wall windows, separate WiFi networks for staff and visitors, and all private rooms. But among the most carefully thought-out areas of the facility, opening Saturday and called Einstein Medical Center Montgomery, is a set of eight rooms next to the emergency department. That's where Einstein will treat patients who do not qualify for inpatient admission according to insurers, including Medicare, but who need to be observed for up to 48 hours.
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