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Emergency Medical Services

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NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Department of Homeland Security official said Thursday his agency was surveying the security vulnerabilities of all Philadelphia buildings and facilities near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where Pope Francis will appear twice in September. William Ryan, protective security adviser in Philadelphia, said his agency was examining building exits, screening employees, and searching for hazardous materials to get ready for the papal visit Sept. 26 and 27. He said the agency would make security recommendations for the hotels and other buildings it surveys.
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
When Pine Hill officials appear in Superior Court on Thursday to answer charges of interfering with the operation of the local rescue squad, it may be a moot issue. By then, officials say, there may be a new squad providing ambulance service or emergency medical services may be handled by the fire department. Last month, at the request of the Pine Hill First Aid Squad Inc., a restraining order was placed against borough officials, prohibiting them from interfering with the day-to-day operation of the squad.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Emergency Health Services Council has honored four emergency services workers from Chester County. The four were among 20 workers from across the state honored by the council, an agency of the Pennsylvania Health Department. They are volunteer James R. Goss, dispatcher Jerry V. Moore Jr., nurse Leo Scaccia, and administrator Stephen S. Webb. Goss, who won a Bronze Star as a Navy medic in Vietnam in the late 1960s, was cited as Chester County emergency medical services citizen of the year.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The budget introduced and advanced by New Jersey Democrats on Tuesday includes $2.5 million for Cooper University Hospital to take over emergency medical services in Camden. As reported last week, it also includes $2.5 million for Newark to help that city establish its own EMS operations. The Democrats' spending plan totals $35.3 billion and is expected to head to the floor of each house for a full vote Thursday. Paramedic services in Camden are currently provided by Virtua Health, which operates in every town in Camden and Burlington Counties.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sometimes, a Good Samaritan turns out to be anything but. That's how Delores Cantz feels about an episode in March, when the 82-year-old slipped and fell while dancing at a party in Warminster. Cantz said that after the fall she got up and walked to a side room, where - to her surprise - a crew from the nonprofit Warminster Volunteer Ambulance Corps was waiting to evaluate her and take her to a local hospital. She refused what she thought was an unneeded emergency-room visit.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After 14 years serving Ridley Township, Milmont Fire Company's ambulance needed almost as much work as the patients it served. "It had developed a little cancer here and there," said volunteer firefighter Frank Kennedy. "It was time to get a new one. " When the department went to replace it last year, it received $8,000 toward the purchase from the county's Intercommunity Health Coordination office, which oversees the county Division of Emergency Medical Services. Never again.
NEWS
February 13, 2008
MAYOR NUTTER'S announcement yesterday that he wants to add $3.8 million to the upcoming city budget to improve the response of emergency medical services personnel reminded us of something. Oh yeah - that's what city government's supposed to do: protect its residents. It's not protection when, according to a city-controller report, there's only a 60-percent chance that an ambulance will reach you within nine minutes of a 911 call. That's endangerment. Nutter's action to mend life-threatening gaps in the undermanned and overworked emergency medical services safety net looks promising: five more service units, money for 40 new medics and overtime pay, supplies and equipment.
NEWS
May 18, 2006 | By Sue Van Orden
More than a year ago, a report on the nation's emergency medical services found that woefully inadequate funding and training had left few responders equipped to respond safely and effectively to terrorist attacks or other catastrophes. Little has changed since New York University's Center for Catastrophe Preparedness and Response released "Emergency Medical Services: The Forgotten First Responders" in April 2005. Its highlights: Of the country's 900,000 emergency medical technicians (EMTs)
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Kathy Sheehan contributed to this report
The Police and Fire Medical Association, claiming the city "arbitrarily" slashed $95,000 from this month's benefits payment, planned today to file a lawsuit. The money had been owed to the city for past ambulance and paramedic services it provided to members of the association, an HMO-style medical plan that operates a full-service clinic for some 30,000 police and firefighters, their families, and retirees, said the mayor's chief of staff, David L. Cohen. The deduction, part of a get-tough policy by the cash-starved city that earlier this year saw the late Frank Rizzo's widow billed $305 for the failed efforts of paramedics to save his life, came after the association ignored repeated requests to pay up, Cohen said.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie signed legislation Monday allowing Cooper University Hospital to take control of emergency medical services in Camden, a bill that drew criticism from the city's longtime paramedic-services provider. The measure, which some critics complained was fast-tracked by lawmakers and bypassed regulations, was passed without debate last month in both houses despite opposition from Virtua Health System, which operates the services in every town in Burlington and Camden Counties. Supporters have said the law will allow better coordination between EMS services and the hospitals that receive those patients, including follow-up care for patients who live in Camden.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
On a Thursday afternoon in early May, AlDora Sample was gasping for breath. She called 911 a few minutes past 5 p.m. from her home in Camden. But the paramedic squad stationed in the city was tending to a drug overdose, so the dispatcher summoned a team from three miles away, in Pennsauken. At rush hour, it took the medics more than 12 minutes to get to Sample's tan-sided house on Ware Street. Was that fast enough? Emergency medicine experts say evaluating a paramedic service based on its response times is a tricky proposition at best, depending on the type of emergency, geography, and other factors.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
If all goes as ordained by New Jersey lawmakers, six months from now Camden will be served by a fleet of brand-new ambulances and emergency vehicles staffed by paramedics and medical technicians working for Cooper University Hospital. Cooper, a teaching hospital and a designated Level 1 trauma center, was authorized to take over these services in legislation signed by Gov. Christie last week. Will Camden residents needing emergency care be better off? They will be, Cooper officials promise and some EMTs cautiously hope.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie signed legislation Monday allowing Cooper University Hospital to take control of emergency medical services in Camden, a bill that drew criticism from the city's longtime paramedic-services provider. The measure, which some critics complained was fast-tracked by lawmakers and bypassed regulations, was passed without debate last month in both houses despite opposition from Virtua Health System, which operates the services in every town in Burlington and Camden Counties. Supporters have said the law will allow better coordination between EMS services and the hospitals that receive those patients, including follow-up care for patients who live in Camden.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The budget introduced and advanced by New Jersey Democrats on Tuesday includes $2.5 million for Cooper University Hospital to take over emergency medical services in Camden. As reported last week, it also includes $2.5 million for Newark to help that city establish its own EMS operations. The Democrats' spending plan totals $35.3 billion and is expected to head to the floor of each house for a full vote Thursday. Paramedic services in Camden are currently provided by Virtua Health, which operates in every town in Camden and Burlington Counties.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Amid a power struggle between two of South Jersey's biggest hospital systems, state lawmakers are crafting a budget that could include $2.5 million for Cooper University Hospital to provide emergency medical services in Camden, people familiar with the matter said Thursday. The City of Newark also would receive $2.5 million to provide EMS services there as part of the resolution. The Assembly and Senate would have to vote to include the funding in the next fiscal year's budget, which lawmakers must pass by June 30. Separate legislation is advancing in both houses of the Democratic-controlled Legislature that would enable Cooper to take over paramedic services in Camden, now provided by Marlton-based Virtua Health System at no cost to taxpayers.
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Department of Homeland Security official said Thursday his agency was surveying the security vulnerabilities of all Philadelphia buildings and facilities near the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where Pope Francis will appear twice in September. William Ryan, protective security adviser in Philadelphia, said his agency was examining building exits, screening employees, and searching for hazardous materials to get ready for the papal visit Sept. 26 and 27. He said the agency would make security recommendations for the hotels and other buildings it surveys.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haverford Township soon will house its ambulances on the Haverford College campus and at the Bon Air Fire Company, officials have announced. The township recently contracted with University of Pennsylvania Health Systems for emergency medical services - ending 60-year-old arrangements with two local fire companies. Officials say the move will save the township about $440,000 annually. "Haverford Township is really upping the level of service in this area," James McCans, paramedic director for the township, said of the agreement.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sometimes, a Good Samaritan turns out to be anything but. That's how Delores Cantz feels about an episode in March, when the 82-year-old slipped and fell while dancing at a party in Warminster. Cantz said that after the fall she got up and walked to a side room, where - to her surprise - a crew from the nonprofit Warminster Volunteer Ambulance Corps was waiting to evaluate her and take her to a local hospital. She refused what she thought was an unneeded emergency-room visit.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
THE CONTENTION that the Fire Department is following the model from the 1950s could not be further from the truth. ("A Red-Hot Issue: Phila. Fire Department must get its priorities straight," Daily Views, Jan. 11). In the 1950s there were at least 69 engine companies and 34 ladder companies. Currently, there are 56 engine companies and 28 ladder companies, not including the three daily brownout companies. Over the years, staffing has been reduced significantly. Engine companies were staffed with an officer and five firefighters, ladder companies with an officer and six firefighters.
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