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Emergency Medicine

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NEWS
November 19, 2000 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A stray bullet fired in a drive-by shooting killed a young boy who just hours earlier was sitting in an elementary classroom. Paul E. Gourley, an emergency-room physician, remembers the sounds of the boy's mother crying as he entered the waiting room to deliver the news. Experiences like that one, he said, persuaded him to become medical director of the Youth Violence Prevention Program for Albert Einstein Medical Center. "Until you've had a parent fall into your arms, collapse on the floor after you tell them their child was killed, you don't understand the impact of violence," Gourley said.
NEWS
July 23, 1994 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dr. Robert B. Laucks, 70, whose career at Graduate Hospital spanned four decades, from his internship in 1951 to chairmanship of the department of emergency medicine from 1982 to 1988, died Wednesday at his home in Shamong Township, N.J. "He was a master surgeon - a blend of outstanding techniques, judgment and innovation," said Moreye Nusbaum, chief of surgery at Presbyterian Medical Center, who had been a colleague of Dr. Laucks' at Graduate for...
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The blood-pressure-lowering drugs known as ACE inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment for many diseases. But with growing use of these heart-helping medications, more and more patients are winding up in emergency rooms with a rare side effect that most have not been warned about: swelling around the face and neck. In the worst cases, the patient's tongue and throat become hugely bloated, closing the airway. No medications can slow or reverse this swelling, called angioedema.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rise in electronic medical records has given Brittany Fera, a premed student at Temple University, an "awesome" job that she had no idea existed before she saw an ad last year. It's not the geeky programming kind of job you might guess. The new record-keeping systems, which are touted as a way to improve efficiency and quality, slow down emergency medicine physicians so much that the doctors are hiring young people like Fera to input data for them. They call this growing group of employees "medical scribes.
NEWS
March 7, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Robert W. Driscoll, 69, of Plymouth Meeting, a former Plymouth Township councilman and a retired surgeon at Suburban General Hospital in Norristown who was instrumental in developing trauma medicine procedures there, died of complications from pneumonia Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Dr. Driscoll joined the staff at Suburban General Hospital, now Mercy Suburban Hospital, when the surrounding community was largely rural and trauma medicine primarily involved accidents with farm equipment.
NEWS
August 18, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
So far, three Delaware County hospitals have met the state's criteria for medical command facilities - a designation that ensures that paramedics at an emergency scene will be able to communicate by phone with a physician at that hospital trained in emergency medicine. At such a facility, a physician certified in emergency medicine will be available 24 hours a day for when an emergency call comes in. Such assurance has not always been the case. There once was no guarantee that the physician in a hospital emergency room would be trained in emergency medicine, or even be familiar with what procedures a paramedic or emergency medical technician could do in the field.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
From the soles of his black Reebok sneakers to the top of his fashionably cut hair, John Foster represents a new breed of doctor - the emergency medicine specialist. "Eight or nine years ago we would have had trouble staffing an emergency department with qualified people," said Franklin Kelton, chairman of the department of emergency medicine at Chester County Hospital. "Now I get several calls a week from qualified physicians. " Last Sunday, members of the community were invited to an open house to inspect Chester County Hospital's new emergency room, in the hospital's North Pavilion.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bomb threat has forced the American Board of Emergency Medicine to abruptly cancel examinations for certification and recertification only a few days before 2,000 physicians were scheduled to take them at nine sites around the country. Physicians learned of the board's decision Thursday morning when they received a cryptic Mailgram, which gave only this explanation for the cancellation: "This decision was based upon the possibility of direct harm to individuals related to the examination and concerns for security at all examination sites.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Billy Mills 3d lies on a table in a hospital trauma room, head pillowed on his arms, ankles crossed, attitude bravado. His brown eyes, however, are wide and frightened. The 5-year-old fell at his Barnsboro home and opened a jagged cut above his right elbow. His father has brought him to the emergency department at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals/Washington Township Division, the hurt arm swaddled in a blue bath towel. Dr. Robert A. Supplee explains what he is about to do and asks the boy if he understands.
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NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two weeks before New Jersey legislators, without debate, voted overwhelmingly to have Cooper University Hospital take over paramedic services in Camden, a state panel of emergency medicine professionals recommended against the move. Two panel members say they and others objected to the plan because it never went through the normal state Department of Health process to vet such a major change. The Virtua health-care system, a competitor of Cooper, has had the job for 38 years. A dozen other members of the New Jersey EMS Council declined to comment, did not return reporters' calls or e-mails, or said they were not present for the vote at the group's quarterly meeting June 10. The advisory group, which includes physicians, emergency officials, and other experts, reports to the Department of Health.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds of Thursday flights were canceled and towns declared emergencies in advance of snowfall likely to be the signature event of a tenacious late-winter spell that has iced the region with record cold and nuisance storms. "It's been horrendous," Steve Lorenz, the Philadelphia Streets Department chief engineer, said Wednesday as he was preparing his crews to do battle yet again, this time with up to eight inches of snow possible by day's end. "In the last month, it feels like it's every other day," he said, adding that winter was making him a stranger in his household.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2014
The Mann Center for the Performing Arts , Philadelphia, named Chris Bruner chairman of the board. He is managing partner of EY Philadelphia (formerly Ernst & Young Philadelphia) and succeeds Justin P. Klein, partner and practice leader of the securities group at Ballard Spahr L.L.P. Joanne Murray has been named vice president and president-elect of the Bucks Country Bar Association . She is an attorney at Antheil Maslow & Macminn L.L.P., Doylestown. CeaseFirePA , a Philadelphia gun-violence prevention organization, elected the following board members:     Nick Certo , senior vice president, university and workplace banking, at PNC; Shawn Kraemer, a community volunteer; Phil Goldsmith , former city managing director, Philadelphia school board member and former CeaseFirePA board president; Jim Sayne , a retired senior systems architect at Unisys Corp.; Greg Davis , vice president at NFP Lincoln Benefits Group; Harriet Weiss, CEO of CRW Graphics, and Rick Bowes , a Philadelphia police officer.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA - The mountainous, blackening snow piles, record power outages, winter-strafed roadbeds, and legions of defeated trees. All argue for the singular ferocity of the winter of 2013-14. Dr. Theodore A. Christopher has witnessed something else, and if the weather community isn't ready to rank this season on the severity scale, he is. "This is the worst," said Christopher, the director of emergency medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he has worked for 30 years.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shot on the streets of Philadelphia? You might be better off if help arrives in a patrol car than in an ambulance. From 2003 through 2007, gunshot victims taken to city trauma centers by police survived two-thirds of the time - the same rate as those taken by emergency medical squads, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. But that was only what the raw numbers showed. Generally, shooting victims transported by police during that five-year period were more gravely wounded.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
The bombs that made Boston look like a combat zone have also brought battlefield medicine to their civilian victims. A decade of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan has sharpened skills and scalpels, leading to dramatic advances that are now being used to treat the 13 amputees and nearly a dozen other patients still fighting to keep damaged limbs. "The only field or occupation that benefits from war is medicine," said David Cifu, rehabilitation-medicine chief at the Veterans Health Administration.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
DR. BON KU, a laid-back father of two, works the Jefferson emergency room. It's a rare night that he doesn't see a patient he saw only a few days or weeks before. That's because many of his patients live on the streets. He knows many of the city's homeless by name, many more by face and ailment. The guy on the corner, he treated for a bad cough. The guy down the street, pneumonia. Not that long ago, he noticed that another man he had treated for pneumonia had been admitted to the hospital.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the patients get to Jeanmarie Perrone in the emergency room at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, they are sometimes already blue. Sometimes alive, but sometimes blue. Lack of oxygen will do that to a body. Overdoses of prescription opioid painkillers can cause depressed breathing, a lack of oxygen moving through the body, and then death. America has a continuing epidemic of such overdoses, with more than 15,000 deaths per year, government agencies say, more than from cocaine and heroin combined.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Male pedestrians at risk More than twice as many men as women die in pedestrian-vehicle accidents. Now researchers have partly determined why. Writing online last month in the journal Injury Prevention, investigators considered the contribution of three factors: distance walked, number of accidents, and fatalities per accident. Researchers using data from a variety of sources found that men and women walk similar distances and that men are involved in slightly more accidents per mile.
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