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Emergency Room

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The subject of The Shadow Saver is an emergency-room physician, but don't go to the Independent Eye production expecting to see scene after dramatic scene of urgent activity as doctors and nurses work intently on wounded and injured patients. In other words, this is not the television show ER transferred to the stage. Oh, there will be a man, or rather a puppet, with a screwdriver stuck in his chest, but that will be the exception. According to Conrad Bishop, co- writer of The Shadow Saver, "there is not a lot of instantaneous high drama" in the piece.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Henry English, a young boy who had just stepped on a nail, got out of his aunt's station wagon and started to limp toward the emergency entrance at Giuffre Medical Center. "I hope you're not bringing him over here," a security guard called to Henry's aunt, Joyce English, who had rushed the boy from the family's home on Perth Street near Broad. "The emergency room's closed. " "But this is the closest emergency room," Joyce English protested. "Take him to St. Joe's," the security guard said.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With many doctors' offices closed in New Jersey this week to protest soaring liability-insurance bills, hundreds of sick people have flocked to hospital emergency rooms for routine care. Will patients, who were turned away by their own physicians, end up shelling out more money for medical insurance co-payments because they sought treatment in an emergency room and not a physician's office? Probably, yes. Patients may not get the co-payment bill due for their emergency room visit for a few weeks, but the co-pay for a hospital emergency room visit typically runs more than a doctor's office visit - $10 to $40 more, depending on the health insurer and the health plan.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Health yesterday permitted the James C. Giuffre Medical Center to reopen its emergency room, effectively ending a 15- day-old ban on patient admissions at the hospital. The state, however, continued to restrict the number of medical/surgical patients at the North Philadelphia hospital to 80. The facility, at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, has the capacity for 148 medical/surgical patients. Bruce Reimer, a Health Department spokesman, said the emergency room was allowed to reopen "because our staff is pleased with the continuing progress made at the facility over the past week.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Harrisburg-based health insurance company - HealthAmerica and HealthAssurance Pennsylvania Inc. - has reached an agreement with the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office over complaints that it improperly rejected emergency-room treatment claims from more than 600 subscribers across the state, the Attorney General's Office said yesterday. HealthAmerica agreed to reprocess and pay $445,981 in claims. Most of that money will go to hospitals and doctors whose bills were rejected, said Nils Frederiksen, deputy press secretary for Attorney General Tom Corbett.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
It wasn't quite a train wreck, but it was still a world of trouble. The emergency room at Episcopal Hospital in Kensington was about to get flooded with victims of bad heroin, and Becki Stuhlemmer knew it. And she knew she had to move fast. They needed more doctors. More nurses. More security, more hospital beds, more supplies. More everything. Stuhlemmer, Episcopal's admistrative director of emergency services, started calling other departments, mobilizing people throughout the hospital.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1992 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A financially troubled hospital group plans to consolidate some medical services and eliminate others in an effort to save millions in annual expenses. North Philadelphia Health System will shift all of its emergency-room and acute-care services to St. Joseph's Hospital at 16th and Girard. It will consolidate its growing substance-abuse and psychiatric programs at Girard Medical Center at Eighth and Girard, according to a plan released yesterday. The system employs about 1,300 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
College boy Michael Bressler makes an important call home. "Mom, I got hit by a bus. " Naturally, his mother freaks. She doesn't understand that Michael's a lucky one, freshman at Penn, hit by a bus near Penn, whisked to the emergency room at Penn's hospital. He could be going to some country college, without the miracle factory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Or, like many of his fellow patients, he could be so smashed up that he wouldn't be able to hold a phone or talk or even know who his mother was. The best show on television tonight is hiding at 10 on a cable outpost called the Learning Channel (look for TLC on your cable guide)
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Janice Heller, Special to The Inquirer
It's an oft-repeated scene. An ambulance arrives at a hospital emergency room carrying the victim of a traffic accident. The woman is unconscious and in need of immediate surgery for head injuries, and the staff quickly swings into action. But not much is said to the couple sitting anxiously in a corner of the waiting room. They are the parents of the victim, and they arrived 20 minutes after their child was brought in. In the bustle, they are overlooked by a medical staff busy with the task at hand.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any day now, a bleeding, severely injured patient will be whisked into Lehigh Valley Hospital and enter not only the emergency room, but medical-research history. Unconscious and close to death, the patient will receive an experimental blood substitute that doctors hope will save many lives. Scientists have been trying for decades to develop artificial blood, until recently with little success. Now, Lehigh Valley has been chosen as the first hospital in the nation to administer such a product to a trauma patient - without the patient's consent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A 13-year-old boy was charged Tuesday with aggravated assault, weapon offenses and related charges after he shot and wounded himself and an 11-year-old girl in a South Philadelphia home Monday night, police said. The boy's name was not released because he was charged as a juvenile. Police said that about 8:30 p.m. Monday, officers went to a home on the 2100 block of Etting Terrace for a report of a person with a gun. There, they found the girl suffering from a gunshot wound to her right knee.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
DEAR ABBY: On a recent trip out of state, my husband became ill. The hotel we stayed in referred us to a nearby urgent care walk-in clinic. The nurse took his blood pressure, which was very high. The "doctor" never took his temperature or mentioned the high blood pressure to us. He prescribed six drugs and we went on our way. My husband was happy; I was not. When we returned home, I looked up the doctor's name on the internet. Actually, he was a physician's assistant, not a medical doctor.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Princeton businesswoman Kim Pimley serves on nonprofit boards, ran for mayor a few years back, and keeps in shape by bashing a 150-pound punching bag. The type of person who runs up escalators, the 55-year-old was always overflowing with energy. Until, all of a sudden, she wasn't. She started to feel short of breath in early January, and wondered whether she had caught a bug. But she felt progressively worse, at one point unable to climb the stairs without sitting to rest halfway up. Within days she was sent to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where she received unthinkable news: A rare, aggressive disease, its cause unknown, was attacking her heart.
NEWS
April 7, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Consult kin of elderly We are grateful for Stacey Burling's article discussing care of elderly patients with diminished mental function ("Care of memory-loss patients reviewed," March 28). We have assisted in the care of our charming but often slightly befuddled mother countless times in the past 10 years. Too many times when she has gone to emergency rooms at Philadelphia hospitals, our requests to be contacted so we can provide an accurate history and critical information have been ignored.
NEWS
February 23, 2016
ISSUE | MARIJUANA A medical necessity My son, Marksen, 7, was diagnosed with autism at age 2. He has always had difficulty with behavioral issues, but his condition has worsened greatly in the past year: He has become violent toward himself and others, especially his family. Marksen has been to the hospital at least 50 times in the last year- to the emergency room, gastrointestinal doctors, and an autism specialist. We've tried various medications, with numerous side effects and little relief.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aetna Inc. has signed a contract with the Delaware Valley Accountable Care Organization expected to cover 70,000 commercially-insured Aetna members under the care of primary-care physicians in the Philadelphia-area ACO, the Connecticut insurer said Tuesday. The Aetna deal is the first commercial contract for the Delaware Valley ACO, which is owned by Main Line Health, Jefferson Health, Holy Redeemer Health System, Doylestown Health, and Magee Rehabilitiation Hospital. Since 2014, the Delware Valley ACO has been participating in a Medicare shared-savings program.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since suffering a near-fatal asthma attack in the summer of 2014, 51-year-old Peter Bowser has been hospitalized 20 times. Doctors believe Bowser's asthma was exacerbated by his living conditions: a resident of a Camden homeless shelter, he left the facility each morning and walked several miles to a library, where he could stay indoors to get relief from hot or cold weather. Last month, Bowser became one of the first people to be placed in an apartment through Camden County's new "Housing First" program, aimed at reducing chronic homelessness and expensive emergency room visits.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury has awarded $10.1 million to a mother and her son, whose physicians at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia failed to timely diagnose his bacterial meningitis following several trips to the emergency room. Shamir Tillery, now 6, suffers from hearing loss, language disorder, developmental and learning delays, and a loss of balance. He was 11 months old when he came down with meningitis. "You just have to ask yourself how this kid can go, this baby can go, to CHOP three days in a row with this problem and it takes them that long to say, 'You know, he really is having a problem,' " the family's lawyer, Andrew Stern, said Wednesday.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Tamela Oglesby was gasping for air. "It felt like my last breath," the 35-year-old nursing assistant said, reaching for her throat as she recounted that night one year ago. "I thought I was going to die. My heart was just beating, really, really fast. " Figuring it would be the fastest way there, she took a bus to Pennsylvania Hospital's emergency room, a few blocks from her Northern Liberties apartment. A chest X-ray revealed the diagnosis that changed her life in ways Oglesby could not have expected.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
When Ethan Silver injured his knee during a high school wrestling match, his parents took him to the hospital to have it checked. It wasn't a life-and-death situation, so the Silvers went to a hospital they knew accepted the Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance they had through work. Ethan's sprained knee was taped, and he was given crutches and told to follow up with an orthopedist. The Silvers paid their $100 co-pay and headed home to Blue Bell. A few weeks later, they received a $200 bill from a doctor who examined Ethan in the emergency room.
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