CollectionsEmergency Room
IN THE NEWS

Emergency Room

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The subject of The Shadow Saver is an emergency-room physician, but don't go to the Independent Eye production expecting to see scene after dramatic scene of urgent activity as doctors and nurses work intently on wounded and injured patients. In other words, this is not the television show ER transferred to the stage. Oh, there will be a man, or rather a puppet, with a screwdriver stuck in his chest, but that will be the exception. According to Conrad Bishop, co- writer of The Shadow Saver, "there is not a lot of instantaneous high drama" in the piece.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Henry English, a young boy who had just stepped on a nail, got out of his aunt's station wagon and started to limp toward the emergency entrance at Giuffre Medical Center. "I hope you're not bringing him over here," a security guard called to Henry's aunt, Joyce English, who had rushed the boy from the family's home on Perth Street near Broad. "The emergency room's closed. " "But this is the closest emergency room," Joyce English protested. "Take him to St. Joe's," the security guard said.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With many doctors' offices closed in New Jersey this week to protest soaring liability-insurance bills, hundreds of sick people have flocked to hospital emergency rooms for routine care. Will patients, who were turned away by their own physicians, end up shelling out more money for medical insurance co-payments because they sought treatment in an emergency room and not a physician's office? Probably, yes. Patients may not get the co-payment bill due for their emergency room visit for a few weeks, but the co-pay for a hospital emergency room visit typically runs more than a doctor's office visit - $10 to $40 more, depending on the health insurer and the health plan.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Health yesterday permitted the James C. Giuffre Medical Center to reopen its emergency room, effectively ending a 15- day-old ban on patient admissions at the hospital. The state, however, continued to restrict the number of medical/surgical patients at the North Philadelphia hospital to 80. The facility, at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, has the capacity for 148 medical/surgical patients. Bruce Reimer, a Health Department spokesman, said the emergency room was allowed to reopen "because our staff is pleased with the continuing progress made at the facility over the past week.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Harrisburg-based health insurance company - HealthAmerica and HealthAssurance Pennsylvania Inc. - has reached an agreement with the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office over complaints that it improperly rejected emergency-room treatment claims from more than 600 subscribers across the state, the Attorney General's Office said yesterday. HealthAmerica agreed to reprocess and pay $445,981 in claims. Most of that money will go to hospitals and doctors whose bills were rejected, said Nils Frederiksen, deputy press secretary for Attorney General Tom Corbett.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
It wasn't quite a train wreck, but it was still a world of trouble. The emergency room at Episcopal Hospital in Kensington was about to get flooded with victims of bad heroin, and Becki Stuhlemmer knew it. And she knew she had to move fast. They needed more doctors. More nurses. More security, more hospital beds, more supplies. More everything. Stuhlemmer, Episcopal's admistrative director of emergency services, started calling other departments, mobilizing people throughout the hospital.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1992 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A financially troubled hospital group plans to consolidate some medical services and eliminate others in an effort to save millions in annual expenses. North Philadelphia Health System will shift all of its emergency-room and acute-care services to St. Joseph's Hospital at 16th and Girard. It will consolidate its growing substance-abuse and psychiatric programs at Girard Medical Center at Eighth and Girard, according to a plan released yesterday. The system employs about 1,300 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
College boy Michael Bressler makes an important call home. "Mom, I got hit by a bus. " Naturally, his mother freaks. She doesn't understand that Michael's a lucky one, freshman at Penn, hit by a bus near Penn, whisked to the emergency room at Penn's hospital. He could be going to some country college, without the miracle factory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Or, like many of his fellow patients, he could be so smashed up that he wouldn't be able to hold a phone or talk or even know who his mother was. The best show on television tonight is hiding at 10 on a cable outpost called the Learning Channel (look for TLC on your cable guide)
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Janice Heller, Special to The Inquirer
It's an oft-repeated scene. An ambulance arrives at a hospital emergency room carrying the victim of a traffic accident. The woman is unconscious and in need of immediate surgery for head injuries, and the staff quickly swings into action. But not much is said to the couple sitting anxiously in a corner of the waiting room. They are the parents of the victim, and they arrived 20 minutes after their child was brought in. In the bustle, they are overlooked by a medical staff busy with the task at hand.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any day now, a bleeding, severely injured patient will be whisked into Lehigh Valley Hospital and enter not only the emergency room, but medical-research history. Unconscious and close to death, the patient will receive an experimental blood substitute that doctors hope will save many lives. Scientists have been trying for decades to develop artificial blood, until recently with little success. Now, Lehigh Valley has been chosen as the first hospital in the nation to administer such a product to a trauma patient - without the patient's consent.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
He wanted to practice Spanish. She wanted to hone her English. So, using a Skype profile feature that allowed them to text and talk, they got acquainted in two languages. Matt was a senior at Albright College in Reading, a Spanish major with a yen for public service; he'd spent part of junior year tutoring first graders in Nicaragua. Marlene was finishing college in Bolivia and hoped English fluency would boost her chances of landing a job as an environmental engineer. "Neither of us was looking for anything romantic," Marlene recalls.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 25-year-old man was killed by a gunman who chased him down a Point Breeze street Monday morning, Philadelphia police said. Another four people were wounded in separate shooting and stabbing incidents across the city. Police responded to a report of gunshots on the 1700 block of Tasker Street in Point Breeze at 11:48 a.m., and found the 25-year-old victim shot several times, in the left leg, arm, and chest. A medic took the man to Jefferson University Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jane Miloradovich, For The Inquirer
Three state health departments recently issued warnings about a rise in emergency room visits when people fell seriously ill after using a synthetic drug known as K2 or Spice. The substances are sold as "synthetic marijuana. " A typical urine drug screening cannot detect them. Chemically, they're called THC homologs. Poison centers across the country have been receiving more calls related to these substances. From Jan. 1 through April 29, poison centers received 2,365 calls from people seeking help for adverse reactions to these drugs.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Midafternoon on a recent Friday, the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics e-mailed its membership that it would hold a webinar on measles. By the time registration closed at 6 p.m. that Sunday, 219 doctors had signed up for the next morning's presentation - more watched in groups - and another session had to be scheduled for later in the week. Fifteen years after measles was officially eliminated from the United States, most young doctors have never seen an actual case.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The cell reception at her West Chester home had been spotty. So after watching her three oldest children get onto the school bus at the end of her driveway, Jackie Collas dialed Verizon and asked about boosting the signal. It had been a harsh winter, and she worried about being able to reach 911 in an emergency. After hanging up on that morning last February, she went to check on Curren, her 2-year-old. She found him trapped and motionless beneath his overturned, five-drawer dresser.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richie Hartzel's friend meant no harm during the sleepover last January when he started rat-tailing a towel at the 13-year-old's back. But in that critical fraction of a second when what-ifs become what-nows, Richie turned to look over his shoulder. The tip of the towel snapped into his left eye, detonating in the cornea, the eye's outer layer, and ripping the iris that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. Richie's parents rushed over to drive him to the hospital and found that their son's entire eye had gone horrifyingly black.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melvin McIlwaine had one of those weeks last week. His criminal fraud trial was to have started last Monday in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, but he wound up in the emergency room, complaining of "cardiac arrest" followed by a day of nausea. So the only way to ensure McIlwaine stayed healthy - and available - reasoned Judge Angelo J. Foglietta, was jail. "I'll be here, even if I have a nosebleed," McIlwaine, 61, of South Philadelphia, protested when he appeared a day later before Foglietta.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHO HAS EVER seen a baby pigeon? All the pigeons we see on city sidewalks are full-grown, but logic tells us there must be babies somewhere. It was kind of typical of Pete Nolan that he found two when he was living in Mayfair - out of their nests and seemingly abandoned. Pete took them in, got on the phone and found a sanctuary in Newark, N.J., that agreed to take the pigeons. Not only pigeons, but wild cats, rejected dogs, ferrets, guinea pigs and basically any creature that crawls or waddles and needs a home came into Pete Nolan's loving care.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Daniel Taylor, M.D., For The Inquirer
When life gives you lemons . . . . "He was a beautiful, healthy, happy, newborn boy with a full set of curly black hair," Mom said, recalling his birth four years ago. "But then," she hesitated, painful memories obviously causing her to pause, "something wasn't right. " I listened intently as she recalled the multiple trips to the emergency room for crying fits and constipation at one month old. "They quickly diagnosed him with constipation and reassured us that he would be fine," she said, her frustration over the emergency room staff's ignoring her maternal instincts quite evident.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Linda Loyd, and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospital and public health officials are acutely aware of the public dismay at the poor handling of the first case of Ebola diagnosed - too late - in this country. Thomas E. Duncan, 42, arrived in Dallas from Liberia on Sept. 20. He became sick and went to a Dallas hospital on Sept. 25, but was misdiagnosed and sent home. He returned to the hospital by ambulance on Sunday and is now in isolation, in serious condition. About 50 people who came into contact with him after he developed symptoms - which is when the disease is contagious - are being monitored closely, including four family members who are under quarantine for 21 days at a Dallas apartment complex.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|