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Emergency Room

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1995 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The subject of The Shadow Saver is an emergency-room physician, but don't go to the Independent Eye production expecting to see scene after dramatic scene of urgent activity as doctors and nurses work intently on wounded and injured patients. In other words, this is not the television show ER transferred to the stage. Oh, there will be a man, or rather a puppet, with a screwdriver stuck in his chest, but that will be the exception. According to Conrad Bishop, co- writer of The Shadow Saver, "there is not a lot of instantaneous high drama" in the piece.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Henry English, a young boy who had just stepped on a nail, got out of his aunt's station wagon and started to limp toward the emergency entrance at Giuffre Medical Center. "I hope you're not bringing him over here," a security guard called to Henry's aunt, Joyce English, who had rushed the boy from the family's home on Perth Street near Broad. "The emergency room's closed. " "But this is the closest emergency room," Joyce English protested. "Take him to St. Joe's," the security guard said.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With many doctors' offices closed in New Jersey this week to protest soaring liability-insurance bills, hundreds of sick people have flocked to hospital emergency rooms for routine care. Will patients, who were turned away by their own physicians, end up shelling out more money for medical insurance co-payments because they sought treatment in an emergency room and not a physician's office? Probably, yes. Patients may not get the co-payment bill due for their emergency room visit for a few weeks, but the co-pay for a hospital emergency room visit typically runs more than a doctor's office visit - $10 to $40 more, depending on the health insurer and the health plan.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Department of Health yesterday permitted the James C. Giuffre Medical Center to reopen its emergency room, effectively ending a 15- day-old ban on patient admissions at the hospital. The state, however, continued to restrict the number of medical/surgical patients at the North Philadelphia hospital to 80. The facility, at Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, has the capacity for 148 medical/surgical patients. Bruce Reimer, a Health Department spokesman, said the emergency room was allowed to reopen "because our staff is pleased with the continuing progress made at the facility over the past week.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Harrisburg-based health insurance company - HealthAmerica and HealthAssurance Pennsylvania Inc. - has reached an agreement with the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office over complaints that it improperly rejected emergency-room treatment claims from more than 600 subscribers across the state, the Attorney General's Office said yesterday. HealthAmerica agreed to reprocess and pay $445,981 in claims. Most of that money will go to hospitals and doctors whose bills were rejected, said Nils Frederiksen, deputy press secretary for Attorney General Tom Corbett.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
It wasn't quite a train wreck, but it was still a world of trouble. The emergency room at Episcopal Hospital in Kensington was about to get flooded with victims of bad heroin, and Becki Stuhlemmer knew it. And she knew she had to move fast. They needed more doctors. More nurses. More security, more hospital beds, more supplies. More everything. Stuhlemmer, Episcopal's admistrative director of emergency services, started calling other departments, mobilizing people throughout the hospital.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1992 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A financially troubled hospital group plans to consolidate some medical services and eliminate others in an effort to save millions in annual expenses. North Philadelphia Health System will shift all of its emergency-room and acute-care services to St. Joseph's Hospital at 16th and Girard. It will consolidate its growing substance-abuse and psychiatric programs at Girard Medical Center at Eighth and Girard, according to a plan released yesterday. The system employs about 1,300 people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
College boy Michael Bressler makes an important call home. "Mom, I got hit by a bus. " Naturally, his mother freaks. She doesn't understand that Michael's a lucky one, freshman at Penn, hit by a bus near Penn, whisked to the emergency room at Penn's hospital. He could be going to some country college, without the miracle factory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Or, like many of his fellow patients, he could be so smashed up that he wouldn't be able to hold a phone or talk or even know who his mother was. The best show on television tonight is hiding at 10 on a cable outpost called the Learning Channel (look for TLC on your cable guide)
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | By Janice Heller, Special to The Inquirer
It's an oft-repeated scene. An ambulance arrives at a hospital emergency room carrying the victim of a traffic accident. The woman is unconscious and in need of immediate surgery for head injuries, and the staff quickly swings into action. But not much is said to the couple sitting anxiously in a corner of the waiting room. They are the parents of the victim, and they arrived 20 minutes after their child was brought in. In the bustle, they are overlooked by a medical staff busy with the task at hand.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1997 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any day now, a bleeding, severely injured patient will be whisked into Lehigh Valley Hospital and enter not only the emergency room, but medical-research history. Unconscious and close to death, the patient will receive an experimental blood substitute that doctors hope will save many lives. Scientists have been trying for decades to develop artificial blood, until recently with little success. Now, Lehigh Valley has been chosen as the first hospital in the nation to administer such a product to a trauma patient - without the patient's consent.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
What a headache! Coworkers at the nail salon were worried about Xi. She had been a remarkably reliable worker for the last 20 years. Always on time, she seemed to enjoy her work. Meticulous and skillful, she trimmed cuticles, filed nails and applied polish to her clients' fingers and toes, taking pride in perfection. Over the last month, however, Xi had started to show up late, sometimes with bedraggled hair and rumpled clothes. Her work was deteriorating, too. Regular customers were concerned, asking if she was ill or suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Karen Balentine suddenly lost her husband to a heart attack in 2010 after 47 years of marriage, she was devastated. About a year later, though, she decided it was time to move on - and went online to do it. About the same time, Calvin Hubbard, 64, was grieving the loss of his wife, who died in November 2011. He had met her on the Internet, "and for 13 years it was a terrific marriage," he said. So, feeling lonely and hoping to make new connections, he turned to the Web again, though he wasn't looking to get married just yet. Balentine, now 71, and Hubbard were matched in 2012 on ChristianMingle.com, both agreeing they would be friends at first and go on "doctor dates" - he would drive her to medical appointments.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Michael Vitez and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ouch. Pat Miller, 59, of Clementon, walked down her front walk at 7:15 a.m. Friday going to work, slipped on the ice, and broke the first bone of her life - her right wrist. The timing couldn't be worse. Her daughter is getting married in the first week of February. "So I'll probably have a cast," she lamented. "Maybe they can glitter it up. " Few in the Philadelphia area expected the ground to be a sheet of ice Friday morning, certainly not Miller, a secretary with Moorestown Township schools.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The twice-extended deadline to enroll in subsidized health insurance and be covered from the start of the new year has finally passed. Well, sort of. Administration officials said last week they would try to arrange Jan. 1 coverage for people who have had trouble getting through the cranky website. Meanwhile, insurers are switching their focus to confirming that the people who have successfully signed up appear in company records. The problem is that the transfer of customer data from healthcare.gov to insurance companies and the quality of the information has been - you guessed it - glitchy.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
"My son will be 4 weeks old on Saturday," the young woman thought glumly as she sat burning with fever and with the same dull ache in her lower belly she'd had for weeks. She'd always been healthy and optimistic. The pregnancy had been a breeze. Now, in a hospital hours from her newborn at home, she was feeling discouraged. Her first pregnancy four years earlier had been complicated by prolonged labor, and she'd had a cesarean section. With her narrow pelvis, her doctors recommended another C-section for her new son. The surgery had gone well, and she'd gone home with the healthy baby a few days later.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Dr. Charitha Gowda, For The Inquirer
She closed her calculus textbook and put it aside. The text and equations on the page had started to blur together, and all she could focus on was how her throat was on fire. She took a few small sips from the bottle of orange juice that had been her constant companion for the last week. "It can't be the flu," she thought, since she didn't have a headache, runny nose, cough, or muscle aches. Having had strep throat many times as a child, she had initially thought this episode was no different.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IN EVERY emergency room in every hospital in Philadelphia, doctors treat ailing homeless men and women, and then send them back into the streets a few hours later because they aren't sick enough to keep in the hospital. But because the streets are no place to recover, it doesn't take long before they come right back to the ER, sometimes even sicker. These doctors and nurses know it's inhumane and costly, but they've had few options. Until now. Come January, Philadelphia will finally have a clean and safe place for homeless patients to recuperate, with a six-bed medical respite center in the former chapel at Depaul House in East Germantown.
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
He woke up abruptly one morning with horrible pain in his left knee. Within an hour he had unbearable right hip pain that doubled him over and prompted him to go to the emergency room. The patient, now in his mid-50s, was no stranger to pain, but it was belly pain he was used to, not pain in the joints. He had been dealing with Crohn's disease for most of his life. The Crohn's had started in college with belly pain and diarrhea that had gone on for weeks. While the disease was hard to control the first few years, causing him to have part of his bowels removed, he managed quite well overall and lived a full life.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
VENTNOR, N.J. Nearly a decade ago, Bill Ferrier saw a yellow laundry bag tumbling around in the Atlantic Ocean. He carried it to the Ventnor boardwalk and opened it. Inside, he found the body of a newborn, umbilical cord and placenta still attached. He called the police, then his wife, Susan. "You're not going to believe what I found," he told her. "Is it a body?" Susan Ferrier recalled asking her husband. He replied: "It's a little bit worse than that; it's a newborn. " The six-pound girl had been in the water for one to two days, but it was not clear when or where she had been strangled, an autopsy showed.
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