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Emergency Room

BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sometimes, a Good Samaritan turns out to be anything but. That's how Delores Cantz feels about an episode in March, when the 82-year-old slipped and fell while dancing at a party in Warminster. Cantz said that after the fall she got up and walked to a side room, where - to her surprise - a crew from the nonprofit Warminster Volunteer Ambulance Corps was waiting to evaluate her and take her to a local hospital. She refused what she thought was an unneeded emergency-room visit.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AN ELDERLY MAN who accompanied his ailing wife to Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland Wednesday night was stabbed multiple times after getting into a fight in the hospital's emergency room, according to police. At about 10:25 p.m., the man was with his wife in the emergency room when he got into an argument with John David Hood, police said. According to Crozer-Chester Medical Center spokesman Grant Gegwich, Hood is also a relative of the ailing woman, although his relationship to her was not detailed.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
What a headache! Coworkers at the nail salon were worried about Xi. She had been a remarkably reliable worker for the last 20 years. Always on time, she seemed to enjoy her work. Meticulous and skillful, she trimmed cuticles, filed nails and applied polish to her clients' fingers and toes, taking pride in perfection. Over the last month, however, Xi had started to show up late, sometimes with bedraggled hair and rumpled clothes. Her work was deteriorating, too. Regular customers were concerned, asking if she was ill or suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Karen Balentine suddenly lost her husband to a heart attack in 2010 after 47 years of marriage, she was devastated. About a year later, though, she decided it was time to move on - and went online to do it. About the same time, Calvin Hubbard, 64, was grieving the loss of his wife, who died in November 2011. He had met her on the Internet, "and for 13 years it was a terrific marriage," he said. So, feeling lonely and hoping to make new connections, he turned to the Web again, though he wasn't looking to get married just yet. Balentine, now 71, and Hubbard were matched in 2012 on ChristianMingle.com, both agreeing they would be friends at first and go on "doctor dates" - he would drive her to medical appointments.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
January 12, 2014 | By Michael Vitez and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Ouch. Pat Miller, 59, of Clementon, walked down her front walk at 7:15 a.m. Friday going to work, slipped on the ice, and broke the first bone of her life - her right wrist. The timing couldn't be worse. Her daughter is getting married in the first week of February. "So I'll probably have a cast," she lamented. "Maybe they can glitter it up. " Few in the Philadelphia area expected the ground to be a sheet of ice Friday morning, certainly not Miller, a secretary with Moorestown Township schools.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The twice-extended deadline to enroll in subsidized health insurance and be covered from the start of the new year has finally passed. Well, sort of. Administration officials said last week they would try to arrange Jan. 1 coverage for people who have had trouble getting through the cranky website. Meanwhile, insurers are switching their focus to confirming that the people who have successfully signed up appear in company records. The problem is that the transfer of customer data from healthcare.gov to insurance companies and the quality of the information has been - you guessed it - glitchy.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Dr. Valerianna Amorosa, For The Inquirer
"My son will be 4 weeks old on Saturday," the young woman thought glumly as she sat burning with fever and with the same dull ache in her lower belly she'd had for weeks. She'd always been healthy and optimistic. The pregnancy had been a breeze. Now, in a hospital hours from her newborn at home, she was feeling discouraged. Her first pregnancy four years earlier had been complicated by prolonged labor, and she'd had a cesarean section. With her narrow pelvis, her doctors recommended another C-section for her new son. The surgery had gone well, and she'd gone home with the healthy baby a few days later.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Dr. Charitha Gowda, For The Inquirer
She closed her calculus textbook and put it aside. The text and equations on the page had started to blur together, and all she could focus on was how her throat was on fire. She took a few small sips from the bottle of orange juice that had been her constant companion for the last week. "It can't be the flu," she thought, since she didn't have a headache, runny nose, cough, or muscle aches. Having had strep throat many times as a child, she had initially thought this episode was no different.
NEWS
November 13, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IN EVERY emergency room in every hospital in Philadelphia, doctors treat ailing homeless men and women, and then send them back into the streets a few hours later because they aren't sick enough to keep in the hospital. But because the streets are no place to recover, it doesn't take long before they come right back to the ER, sometimes even sicker. These doctors and nurses know it's inhumane and costly, but they've had few options. Until now. Come January, Philadelphia will finally have a clean and safe place for homeless patients to recuperate, with a six-bed medical respite center in the former chapel at Depaul House in East Germantown.
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