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NEWS
October 5, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Linda Loyd, and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hospital and public health officials are acutely aware of the public dismay at the poor handling of the first case of Ebola diagnosed - too late - in this country. Thomas E. Duncan, 42, arrived in Dallas from Liberia on Sept. 20. He became sick and went to a Dallas hospital on Sept. 25, but was misdiagnosed and sent home. He returned to the hospital by ambulance on Sunday and is now in isolation, in serious condition. About 50 people who came into contact with him after he developed symptoms - which is when the disease is contagious - are being monitored closely, including four family members who are under quarantine for 21 days at a Dallas apartment complex.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 15-year-girl was killed and a 19-year-old man critically wounded by gunfire Monday afternoon on the street in front of Einstein Medical Center in the city's Logan section, police said. What might have been a fight among teens and young adults that started around Broad Street and Olney Avenue turned deadly in the 5400 block of Old York Road, said Chief Inspector Scott Small. About 4:15 p.m., police received numerous calls of a shooting near where Old York connects with Albert Einstein Drive, Small said.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
SEVERAL STATES have enacted laws in recent years that require doctors who perform abortions at clinics to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. These laws, masquerading as measures to protect the health of women, are nothing more than underhanded attempts to obstruct access to abortion services. In every state where such a law has been passed, it would result in the closure of at least some abortion clinics, making it substantially more difficult for women to get the reproductive health care to which they are constitutionally entitled.
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia man has been arrested and jailed in connection with the death of his two-month-old son. On Friday afternoon, police were called by staff at Einstein Medical Center, who reported that the baby boy, Hassan Armstrong, was in critical condition in the emergency room with extensive injuries to his ribs and skull. On Saturday, the child's father, Brian Armstrong, 20, of the 6200 block of Old York Road, was charged with aggravated assault, endangering the welfare of children, recklessly endangering another person, and simple assault.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sometimes, a Good Samaritan turns out to be anything but. That's how Delores Cantz feels about an episode in March, when the 82-year-old slipped and fell while dancing at a party in Warminster. Cantz said that after the fall she got up and walked to a side room, where - to her surprise - a crew from the nonprofit Warminster Volunteer Ambulance Corps was waiting to evaluate her and take her to a local hospital. She refused what she thought was an unneeded emergency-room visit.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AN ELDERLY MAN who accompanied his ailing wife to Crozer-Chester Medical Center in Upland Wednesday night was stabbed multiple times after getting into a fight in the hospital's emergency room, according to police. At about 10:25 p.m., the man was with his wife in the emergency room when he got into an argument with John David Hood, police said. According to Crozer-Chester Medical Center spokesman Grant Gegwich, Hood is also a relative of the ailing woman, although his relationship to her was not detailed.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Dr. John Stern, For The Inquirer
What a headache! Coworkers at the nail salon were worried about Xi. She had been a remarkably reliable worker for the last 20 years. Always on time, she seemed to enjoy her work. Meticulous and skillful, she trimmed cuticles, filed nails and applied polish to her clients' fingers and toes, taking pride in perfection. Over the last month, however, Xi had started to show up late, sometimes with bedraggled hair and rumpled clothes. Her work was deteriorating, too. Regular customers were concerned, asking if she was ill or suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
When Karen Balentine suddenly lost her husband to a heart attack in 2010 after 47 years of marriage, she was devastated. About a year later, though, she decided it was time to move on - and went online to do it. About the same time, Calvin Hubbard, 64, was grieving the loss of his wife, who died in November 2011. He had met her on the Internet, "and for 13 years it was a terrific marriage," he said. So, feeling lonely and hoping to make new connections, he turned to the Web again, though he wasn't looking to get married just yet. Balentine, now 71, and Hubbard were matched in 2012 on ChristianMingle.com, both agreeing they would be friends at first and go on "doctor dates" - he would drive her to medical appointments.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
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