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Emergency Services

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NEWS
October 4, 1999 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years, emergency services in many South Jersey municipalities have been a patchwork of volunteers, backup plans and stretched budgets. In Westampton, the township just hired its first paid emergency medical technicians because volunteer squads could not handle the volume of emergency calls during the day. In Hainesport, two state police officers have handled the township's law enforcement since the Police Department was disbanded for...
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
Kids clambered in and around, over and through ambulances and rescue trucks. They tried on oversize boots and helmets and took turns stretching out in the litters that lined the walls in most of the vehicles. It was a bright Sunday afternoon, and at the Plymouth Meeting Mall, the county was wrapping up its celebration of Emergency Medical Services Week. Members of the Plymouth, Ambler, Whitemarsh and Pleasant Valley ambulance squads had set up shop and were showing off their wares.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Upper Merion supervisors are going to examine the volunteer fire and ambulance companies in the township to see how well they do their jobs and whether they can handle future needs. The Board of Supervisors voted Monday night to seek bids from consultants to conduct an expansive study of the township's emergency services. The bids will be accepted April 15 and the board will award a contract by May 18, said Township Manager Ronald G. Wagenmann. The company that is awarded the project will analyze the fire protection and emergency medical services now provided, future services needed and the most cost-effective way of providing the services and recommend sources of money.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chester County's Department of Emergency Services will lay off four employees tomorrow because of cuts in state funding. Emergency Services has seven full-time workers and three part-timers, in addition to its 46 dispatchers. Two of the full-timers and two part-timers will be laid off, but the dispatchers will not be affected, said Tim Campbell, director of the department. The department also will significantly scale back its campaign to attract recruits for area volunteer ambulance companies, limit county evaluation of emergency response by individual ambulance companies, and reduce emergency medical training for ambulance crews, police and firefighters, Campbell said.
NEWS
October 22, 2002
Pennsylvania's volunteer fire and emergency services are in trouble - and that's a big deal, considering an estimated 90 percent of all the state's firefighters are volunteers. A new state report by the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency paints a dire picture: In just two decades, the numbers of fire and emergency volunteers in the state have plummeted from an estimated 300,000 in 1976 to 70,000 in 1995, the year of the most recent survey. Almost certainly, fewer volunteers could be counted today.
NEWS
August 19, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plan all you want, but when disaster strikes, it's knowing the guy beside you at the scene that makes rescue work go smoothly, a Delaware County official said. "The time to make friends is not at the time of the incident," said Ed Truitt, the county's emergency services director. Unfamiliarity is not likely in the relatively small, 184-square-mile county, where rescue workers tend to know one another and routinely work together. Delaware County has a plan for disaster response.
NEWS
June 20, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A consulting firm specializing in management of organizations in crisis will be in charge of the Chester County Department of Emergency Services for at least the next three months. The county commissioners announced the appointment of Phoenix Management Services Inc. during a news conference yesterday morning held just a few hundred feet from the department's offices in the basement of the county's Government Services Center. Commissioners Chairwoman Karen Martynick said the Chadds Ford firm would provide full-time "interim management services" for the next 90 days, giving the county time to conduct a national search for a department head.
NEWS
March 22, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The wife of the director of Chester County's Department of Emergency Services was one of five women arrested during a prostitution sting at a Center City hotel this week, news reports said yesterday. Theresa Atkins, 49, of the 100 block of Woodgate Lane in Paoli, was arrested Wednesday and charged with prostitution, according to the West Chester Daily Local News and Fox29 News. Her husband is Edward J. Atkins, 59, a retired Air Force colonel who has headed the department for about 10 years.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal lawsuit filed against the Chester County commissioners by a former employee in emergency services has been dismissed by the judge shortly before it was scheduled for trial. U.S. District Court Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter granted the county's motion for summary judgment Tuesday in a case brought last year by Catherine Parvensky-Barwell, who claimed that in 1996, she was fired from her job as training manager for the Department of Emergency Services because she complained that male co-workers made more money than she did. In addition to the commissioners, she also named as a defendant another employee of the department, John Weer, and accused him of manufacturing sexual harassment complaints against her that had no basis in fact.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The metal gurney rolled briskly through the door of the overnight emergency room. Dr. Susan Westmoreland took the stethoscope from around the neck of her lab coat and began to examine Teak's chest. He was a 120-pound fila, a rare and beautiful Brazilian breed with gold and black stripes and long, fleshy jowls meant to protect the dog's throat from the jaguars that roam the South American pampas. He was also deathly sick. He was weak, cold and low on oxygen because of shock.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016
The Introduction to Entrepreneurship workshop conducted in January by the Corzo Center in partnership with the Free Library of Philadelphia awarded $500 micro-grants to: Blue Velo Films: A full-service video-production company. Emergency Information Systems: A company that designs and distributes products to reduce emergency services' response times. Fine Art Portraits: A studio that produces oil paintings of pets. IndagaHome: An online African-inspired magazine. KakeMi Cakes: A company developing single-serve cake mixes.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Inspira Medical Center Woodbury Inc. last year had its first operating profit since 2010, the hospital reported Monday. The Woodbury facility, which is part of Inspira Health Network, had an operating gain of $2.69 million last year, up from a loss of $4.57 million in 2014, on strong outpatient revenue, Inspira said. Inspira said that Woodbury did better than budgeted in outpatient surgeries, physical therapy visits, diagnostic radiology procedures, cardiac catheter laboratory cases, and emergency room visits.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, Staff Writer
The threat of a "paralyzing" blizzard that could affect 20 percent of the nation's population launched a frenzy of preparations across many states Thursday, from capitols to city halls, airports, emergency centers, and hardware stores. The National Weather Service issued a blizzard warning for the Philadelphia area, most of New Jersey, and the New York City area. Blizzard warnings were also in effect for Baltimore and Washington. As they have for days, forecasters predicted from one to two feet of snow from Virginia to southern New England, intensified by high winds and even lightning.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
The New Jersey Supreme Court agreed Monday to consider Virtua Health's motion to block implementation of a law that would force the hospital to cede partial control of emergency medical services in Camden to Cooper University Hospital, pending the state's appeal. The high court said in an order that it would hear Virtua's full motion next Tuesday. The court's action comes after the Appellate Division reversed a lower court judge's stay of the law, signed by Republican Gov. Christie in July.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I'M OBSESSED these days with Philly stories about how one person's lone decision, made in a moment of compassion, can change lives. Take Anne Mahlum. In her teens, she started running to deal with the stress of living in a household beset by addiction. Running gave her clarity and strength. One day in 2007, she was on a jog through Center City, wondering what her life's purpose was. When she ran past a group of homeless men outside a shelter, she realized it was time to stop running past the men and start running with them.
NEWS
July 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two weeks before New Jersey legislators, without debate, voted overwhelmingly to have Cooper University Hospital take over paramedic services in Camden, a state panel of emergency medicine professionals recommended against the move. Two panel members say they and others objected to the plan because it never went through the normal state Department of Health process to vet such a major change. The Virtua health-care system, a competitor of Cooper, has had the job for 38 years. A dozen other members of the New Jersey EMS Council declined to comment, did not return reporters' calls or e-mails, or said they were not present for the vote at the group's quarterly meeting June 10. The advisory group, which includes physicians, emergency officials, and other experts, reports to the Department of Health.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In a Statehouse that has elevated dithering to an art form, it's worth examining any bill that hurtles through the Legislature like a speeding ambulance. As with most supposed emergencies in Trenton, this one turns out to be political and pecuniary in nature. The legislation in question is designed primarily to grant Camden's ambulance and paramedic services by fiat to the city's own Cooper University Hospital, which, probably not coincidentally, is chaired by South Jersey Democratic boss George Norcross.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - South Jersey Democrats are fast-tracking a bill that would give Cooper University Hospital control over paramedic services in Camden, currently run by a rival hospital, in a move that critics say circumvents state regulations. Committees in the Assembly and Senate on Monday each advanced the legislation, sponsored by two Camden County Democrats, Assemblyman Gilbert "Whip" Wilson and Sen. Nilsa Cruz-Perez. The legislation, introduced last week, is expected to reach the floor of each house for a vote before lawmakers break for summer at the end of the fiscal year, June 30, by which time they must pass a balanced budget.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County has filed a lawsuit against 19 Pennsylvania telecommunication providers, alleging that the county has been shorted $41.4 million in 911 fees over the last six years. Filed Monday in Delaware County Court, the suit accuses the providers of withholding fees collected from customers and earmarked for county emergency services. Among those named are Verizon Communications Inc., AT&T Inc., Windstream Communications Inc., and Comcast Phone of Pennsylvania. The suit, filed more than a month after the county began making its concerns public, largely targets carriers that serve large businesses with multiple land and wireless lines.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
IN THE CLOSING scenes of 1972's "The Candidate," Bill McKay (Robert Redford), victorious Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, pulls his campaign guru out of a victory party and into a quiet hotel room, with the press banging at the door. Leaning back against a desk, with a deeply somber expression, McKay asks, "Marvin, what do we do now?" It's unlikely that scene was repeated last night at Vie after former City Councilman Jim Kenney crushed beat five rivals to ascend to Democratic candidate for mayor with a small percentage of the total of registered Democrats, most of whom didn't vote.
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