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Emily Dickinson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For the last 20 years or so of her life, before her death in 1886 at the age of 55, Emily Dickinson didn't leave her family's house in Amherst, Mass. One of America's greatest poets, she is also one of its most famous recluses. In The Belle of Amherst at Hedgerow Theatre, playwright William Luce and actress Penelope Reed artfully combine these two aspects of Emily Dickinson into a comprehensible whole. The Dickinson that Luce creates and Reed presents comes vividly to life. There is no way of knowing, of course, whether Emily Dickinson, about whom not very much is known, was really like the Luce-Reed version, but the woman on the Hedgerow stage is a credible, engaging character, and the audience certainly gets to know and understand her better than the townspeople of Amherst did the real Emily.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010
Emily Dickinson and Her Family's Feuds By Lyndall Gordon Viking. 512 pp. $32.95 Reviewed by Polly Longsworth Among a spate of biographical and fictional works about Emily Dickinson pouring forth this year is Lives Like Loaded Guns , Lyndall Gordon's volcanic replay of the Dickinson family feud, the famous "war between the houses," which resulted in the most bizarre debut of any major figure in American literature....
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To help her start an online poetry and writing journal, Sylvia Baer turned to an old friend, one she regularly brings to life in her one-woman poetry show: Emily Dickinson. For the last eight years, the Gloucester County College professor has put on a replica of a dress worn by the New England poet and performed Passion for Life at schools, nursing homes and other settings. "One reason why I love her poems is that they are not rooted to a specific time and place," Baer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1986 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
They carried her in a white shroud out the back door of her father's house, across fields of buttercups and daisies, to a cemetery on the edge of town. At the age of 55, the author of only 10 published poems, Emily Dickinson had died utterly unknown. One hundred springs later, it is finals week at Amherst College, and young women in cotton skirts and bare feet come to sit with their backs to the cold granite in West Cemetery, reading from the thick volume of 1,775 poems that Emily Dickinson had placed in a drawer in her room before her death on May 15, 1886.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
All men say "what?" to me. Such was the predicament of 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson, who penned that comment in a letter to a cousin. Given to unconventional expressions of thought, Dickinson had grown accustomed to the befuddled interrogative. That her genius was embodied in a woman's anatomy only fortified the barrier to understanding. Dickinson's struggles to make herself understood and to find her place in the world will come to life at 8 p.m. Wednesday at Immaculata College in the Tony Award-winning The Belle of Amherst.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, Special to The Inquirer
The woman stood before her fifth-grade audience and rolled her eyes as though tracing her lopsided smile. "Emily Dickinson, the cracked daughter of Squire Dickinson, they call me," she said. "I don't think I'm cracked. I think I'm different. " Yes, Emily Dickinson, the reclusive 19th-century American poet, was in Woodbury at Walnut Street Elementary last month - sort of. It was actually Sylvia Baer, a professor of English at Gloucester County College and herself a poet.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
1. h. Henry David Thoreau. 2. c. Mark Twain. 3. j. Rainer Maria Rilke. 4. i. Pablo Neruda. 5. a. Langston Hughes. 6. b. Emily Dickinson. 7. f. Margaret Atwood. 8. g. Nadine Stair. 9. d. Pam Brown. 10. e. Bern Williams.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Success is counted sweetest By those who ne'er succeed. To comprehend a nectar Requires sorest need. - Emily Dickinson It was a different kind of English course. The college catalogue gave the first clue. It grouped the course on 19th- century poet Emily Dickinson not with other English courses but with courses on dreams, careers and dysfunctional families. The second clue came from the instructor and students. They sat in a semicircle. Eight women - now friends - listening, laughing, learning about a lady poet whose messages were sometimes clear, sometimes cloudy.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Garth Garrett, Special to The Inquirer
When Penelope Reed takes the stage tomorrow night at Neumann College in Aston, her performance as Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst will be more than just a benefit for Hedgerow Theater's rebuilding effort. It will be a return to her roots. "Jasper Deeter was my first teacher," Reed recalled in a warm, clear voice that resonated with awe as she talked about Hedgerow's legendary founder. Deeter started the company in 1923 and was one of its driving forces until he retired in 1956.
NEWS
October 14, 1991
THE DELUSION OF SEXUAL LIBERATION Modern liberalism suffers unresolved contradictions. It exalts individualism and freedom and, on its radical wing, condemns social orders as oppressive. On the other hand it expects government to provide for all, a feat manageable only by an expansion of authority and a swollen bureaucracy. In other words, liberalism defines government as tyrant father but demands it behave as nurturant mother. Feminism has inherited these contradictions. It sees every hierarchy as repressive, a social fiction; every negative about woman is a male lie designed to keep her in her place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
Ten White Geese By Gerbrand Bakker Translated by David Colmer Penguin. 240 pp. $15. Reviewed by John Timpane       Introducing Gerbrand Bakker: He is Dutch, by trade a gardener. In 2010, his piercing, unexpected, original novel The Twin literally amazed the literary world by, out of next to nowhere, winning the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the world's biggest prize for an individual writer. Even with the deserving competition that year, The Twin deserved to win. Ten White Geese is not a twin to The Twin , but it shares the laconic restraint that made The Twin something new. In Bakker's novels, we must watch and be patient, learn how to understand; no one is coming to tell us. There will be clues, surprises, apparently random disjunctions.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
On Canaan's Side by Sebastian Barry (Viking, $24.95) The lyrical, award-winning novelist depicts Depression-era America through the eyes of Lilly Bere, a political refugee from Ireland. (Sept. 6) Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women by Melissa V. Harris-Perry (Yale, $28) The author, a professor of political science at Tulane University, explores how black women negotiate the many images society throws at them. The personal really is the political - and vice versa.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
A friend, upon hearing that The Belle of Amherst was in production at Rose Valley's Hedgerow Theatre, commented, "That thing is going to play until there's nothing left on Earth but Cher doing it for an audience of cockroaches. " That's a fairly accurate portrait of our species - Cher representing our pathological need for attention and poet Emily Dickinson the quiet delights of privacy. And even if Penelope Reed, Hedgerow's artistic director and poet channeler, doesn't have half Cher's half-life, her longevity in the title role gives her a serious claim on that postapocalyptic lead.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
1. h. Henry David Thoreau. 2. c. Mark Twain. 3. j. Rainer Maria Rilke. 4. i. Pablo Neruda. 5. a. Langston Hughes. 6. b. Emily Dickinson. 7. f. Margaret Atwood. 8. g. Nadine Stair. 9. d. Pam Brown. 10. e. Bern Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010
Emily Dickinson and Her Family's Feuds By Lyndall Gordon Viking. 512 pp. $32.95 Reviewed by Polly Longsworth Among a spate of biographical and fictional works about Emily Dickinson pouring forth this year is Lives Like Loaded Guns , Lyndall Gordon's volcanic replay of the Dickinson family feud, the famous "war between the houses," which resulted in the most bizarre debut of any major figure in American literature....
NEWS
April 13, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Zayd Dohrn's Sick is recognizably a Luna Theater production: a play with big ideas that will fit on a small stage, stylistically pushing the parameters of realism, commenting on some aspect of life in contemporary society. Director Gregory Campbell excavates the big idea here contained in the various understandings of the title. First, there's the fact that the mother, Maxine (Sally Mercer), believes the only way to protect her children's health is to keep them sheltered from the noxious world outside the door.
NEWS
August 28, 2006 | By Mark Franek
When the yellow school buses start coming around again this fall, it's time for parents and children to start thinking earnestly of school. For many young people, especially teens, the first few days of school are exciting, a time to compare summer adventures, scope out the new fashions, and mingle with new peers. I wonder how many of them will share summer experiences that had something - anything - to do with reading a great book. Not many, I bet. I was no different at their age; I don't think I read a book from cover to cover until I was nearly old enough to drive.
NEWS
December 27, 2002 | By J.T. Barbarese
Recently one of the talk-radio mules on a local conservative talk station resurrected the Amiri Baraka controversy. The new charge: Baraka's poem "Somebody Blew Up America" was in violation of "the facts. " Keats (who confused Balboa with Cortez and had the wrong one discovering the Pacific Ocean) once said a fact is not a truth until you have fallen in love with it, a fairly good test of what a poet means by truth. Truth in poetry is the truth of the imagination, not of "evidence" or reportorial accuracy.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To help her start an online poetry and writing journal, Sylvia Baer turned to an old friend, one she regularly brings to life in her one-woman poetry show: Emily Dickinson. For the last eight years, the Gloucester County College professor has put on a replica of a dress worn by the New England poet and performed Passion for Life at schools, nursing homes and other settings. "One reason why I love her poems is that they are not rooted to a specific time and place," Baer said.
NEWS
April 1, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You're walking down Walnut Street and decide to pop into Borders. You quickly choose a paperback and head home. About to lose yourself in the tale, you prop up your feet on the coffee table. But what's this piece of paper in the back - another antitheft device? You unfold it, and the whimsy of it all piques your attention. "Free Poem," it states in large type. Free, and pretty good, too. In this indecisive autumn I stalk my city streets a pacifist in army boots nothing to offer but an inarticulate no . . .. At the bottom of the page, more bold lettering: "(For you, from the Philadelphia Poetry Provider)
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