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Emmylou Harris

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NEWS
October 31, 2003 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
People will always call her country, but, over the last decade, Emmylou Harris has developed a hybrid sound that layers her crystalline voice over a rich sonic tapestry, weaving together elements of folk, atmospheric pop and exotic rhythm. On Wednesday, the striking, silver-haired singer brought her world-class band to the Keswick Theatre in Glenside in support of Stumble Into Grace, her latest collection of haunting songs, produced by Malcolm Burn. The 90-minute set showcased the 56-year-old roots-music elder stateswoman's late-breaking development as a powerful songwriter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1986 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emmylou Harris' 13 (Warner Bros. ) is the plaintive-voiced singer's 13th album, but only the second with new songwriting/production collaborator (and new husband) Paul Kennerly - a partnership that began last year with the release of the ambitious and engaging country "concept" album, The Ballad of Sally Rose. The 10 tracks on 13 aren't thematically linked - they range from a charged- up rockabilly cover of "Mystery Train" to a haunting dirge titled "Your Long Journey" (a synthesizer on "Journey" creates some eerie bagpipe-like sounds)
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
"This really is a special night," Ricky Skaggs said at one point at the Valley Forge Music Fair on Friday, and those weren't the words of just another smarmy country singer shoveling the sincerity knee-deep. Skaggs had it right. What made Friday's bill so exceptional were the acts he was sandwiched between. Ralph Stanley, 67, the bluegrass pioneer who gave Skaggs his first job as one of his Clinch Mountain Boys, opened with a vigorous set of old- timey tunes. And Emmylou Harris, who used Skaggs' picking in her Hot Band for three years in the late '70s, headlined with a beautiful set that showcased her new hot band, the Nash Ramblers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emmylou Harris reshaped her persona with last year's Wrecking Ball, a collaboration with producer Daniel Lanois that set the neotraditional country icon's soprano to a set of darkly atmospheric, rhythmically shaded arrangements. Looking out on a bright day from behind Jackie O sunglasses, Harris played a Saturday afternoon set at the Appel Farm Arts & Music Festival that took fresh risks. Her 80-minute performance was the centerpiece of a festival that drew 7,000 family types and folkies to a patch of Elmer, N.J., farmland with a bill that included Leo Kottke, Janis Ian, Catie Curtis and Moxy Fruvous.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
"This is the one that got me started on these durn love songs. And that's about all there is," a laughing Emmylou Harris said at the Keswick Theatre on Sunday, before revisiting Felice and Boudleaux Bryant's "Love Hurts. " And durn it, that is about all there was: nearly two hours of sad love songs drawn from a career that Harris began as Gram Parsons' musical consort in the early 1970s and that has lately taken her in the direction of the moody, atmospheric Red Dirt Girl (Nonesuch)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas - Before Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell took the Radio Day Stage at the Austin Convention Center at the South by Southwest music conference last week, WXPN-FM general manager Roger LaMay introduced the duo by talking about their "musical conversation of 40 years. " That conversation began when Harris was recording her first solo album, Pieces of the Sky , which came out in 1975. The album's producer (and her soon-to-be-husband), Brian Ahern, played a song for her by an unknown songwriter called "Bluebird Wine.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell are old friends and avatars of important movements underway in traditional country music and Americana, thanks largely to their work, since the mid-1970s. Crowell wrote early signature songs for Harris ("Bluebird Wine" on her 1975 album, Pieces of the Sky ) and played guitar in her famed Hot Band. They're set to perform Sunday at the Keswick Theatre. "We took to each other immediately, felt as if we knew each other forever from the start," Crowell says by phone from the road near Alexandria, Va. When they met in 1974, they shared a record label (Warner Bros.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1988 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
The first volume of The Drifter, a mid-1960s musical-dramatic series that starred Marty Robbins but never was broadcast on television, is being offered to fans on home video. The distributor of the video is Ronny Robbins, son of the late singer. The series' footage was shot in black-and-white in 1965-66, just before color television became common, Ronny Robbins said. "So naturally everyone in television marketing immediately shunned the idea of black-and-white, and the program was never sold for that reason," Robbins said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt toured the wide world of contemporary songwriting on Wednesday night. Performing for a sold-out audience at the Keswick Theater, they reimagined familiar pieces by John Hiatt and Sinead O'Connor, brought new insight to the works of Rosanne Cash, Leonard Cohen and Paul Anka, and celebrated lesser-known gems by Patti Scialfa, Gillian Welch and the Canadian poets Kate and Anna McGarrigle. The two recently issued a duo recording, Western Wall: The Tucson Sessions, and devoted most of the show to its understated pleasures.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Whether as producer or recording artist, Daniel Lanois is as open and welcoming a presence as his sound. His spacious sound and guidance have been magnetic north for Emmylou Harris ( Wrecking Ball ), Neil Young ( Le Noise ), U2 (several albums, in what's turning out to be that band's prime). He creates a wide berth for adventure. On his new album Flesh and Machine and his 2009 Omni Series boxed set, and in live shows like the one at World Cafe Live on Thursday with opener Lonnie Holley, Lanois creates a twilight sound denser than what he has provided for his collaborator-clients.
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NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell are old friends and avatars of important movements underway in traditional country music and Americana, thanks largely to their work, since the mid-1970s. Crowell wrote early signature songs for Harris ("Bluebird Wine" on her 1975 album, Pieces of the Sky ) and played guitar in her famed Hot Band. They're set to perform Sunday at the Keswick Theatre. "We took to each other immediately, felt as if we knew each other forever from the start," Crowell says by phone from the road near Alexandria, Va. When they met in 1974, they shared a record label (Warner Bros.)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first Saturday of the new year, and Doug Seegers was eating breakfast at a McDonald's in West Nashville before heading out to his steadiest gig - playing in front of the local Goodwill store. "Whether I'm playing a big show somewhere or whether I'm playing out on the street for little kids walking by, I get the same kind of joy," Seegers says over the phone. "I'm just looking to play my guitar and spread my music to whoever is around at the time. " Seegers, who plays Sunday at the Ardmore Music Hall, may still enjoy busking, but life certainly has changed over the last year for the 63-year-old country artist.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Whether as producer or recording artist, Daniel Lanois is as open and welcoming a presence as his sound. His spacious sound and guidance have been magnetic north for Emmylou Harris ( Wrecking Ball ), Neil Young ( Le Noise ), U2 (several albums, in what's turning out to be that band's prime). He creates a wide berth for adventure. On his new album Flesh and Machine and his 2009 Omni Series boxed set, and in live shows like the one at World Cafe Live on Thursday with opener Lonnie Holley, Lanois creates a twilight sound denser than what he has provided for his collaborator-clients.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Gram Parsons has been dead since 1973, so we're all 40 years late to the party of seeing Emmylou Harris sing with her ideal duet partner. In 2013, Rodney Crowell will have to do. And Crowell, who sang with her at the Academy of Music on Tuesday night, did just fine. He has a new album with Harris called Old Yellow Moon - their first with equal billing, although they've frequently worked together since the mid-'70s. Not that Harris doesn't still carry the hard-to-compete-with ghost of Parsons around.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas - Before Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell took the Radio Day Stage at the Austin Convention Center at the South by Southwest music conference last week, WXPN-FM general manager Roger LaMay introduced the duo by talking about their "musical conversation of 40 years. " That conversation began when Harris was recording her first solo album, Pieces of the Sky , which came out in 1975. The album's producer (and her soon-to-be-husband), Brian Ahern, played a song for her by an unknown songwriter called "Bluebird Wine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale have been friends since 1980, and the Americana songwriters and guitarists have regularly guested on each other's recordings and live shows through the years. But it wasn't until 2012 that the duo - who will perform a Free at Noon concert at World Cafe Live on Friday, and headline the venue that evening - undertook a fully collaborative project. And instead of one, they started with two. In August, The Buddy & Jim Radio Show launched on Sirius XM satellite radio's Outlaw Country channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
Most mega-concerts that carry a radio station's imprint - say those seasonal Q102 "Jingle Ball" shows - are really put together by a national production company like Live Nation or AEG, without much input from the station. You can tell, 'cause the same talent bills pop up in other cities, with another station's name attached. The XPoNential Music Festival is something else again. Now in its 18th year and returning tonight through Sunday to Wiggins Park on the Camden waterfront, this huge undertaking is very much a local enterprise and labor of love for the folks at Philadelphia's "Triple A" (Adult Alternative Album)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Bootsy, Emmylou, the Duke of Earle and the Duke of Ellington are marching down the aisle with royal CD and DVD music releases this week. MOVE OVER ROVER: Funk a doodle doo, earthlings. The intergalactic party animal Bootsy Collins lands today at "The Funk Capital of the World" (Mascot, A) , and trust me, it's the place to be. Think head-spinning mashups of buzz-bombing electro funk, psychedelic rock, sexy soul and snappy spoken word, often referencing and even sampling past music and cultural icons.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
Jesse Harris - one of four musicians playing together at the Tin Angel on Wednesday - is used to having his name linked with other artists. After all, this is the guy who wrote Norah Jones' biggest hit, the dreamy "Don't Know Why" (plus four other songs on her multimillion-selling debut Come Away With Me), and walked away with a Grammy for his work. Since then, the 37-year-old singer-songwriter has continued to expand his resume, writing songs for Madeleine Peyroux and Lizz Wright, producing up-and-comer Sasha Dobson's debut disc and now scoring a movie, The Hottest State, set for release in August.
NEWS
August 26, 2004 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
Not every dream team disappoints. Emmylou Harris, Patty Griffin, Buddy Miller, Gillian Welch and David Rawlings - touring this summer as the Sweet Harmony Traveling Revue - filled the Keswick Theatre Tuesday night for nearly three hours of American gold: from the Carter Family ("Hello Stranger") to the Louvin Brothers ("There's a Higher Power"); from the Byrds ("Turn! Turn! Turn!") to Bo Diddley ("You Can't Judge a Book by Its Cover"). Aided on and off by Griffin's four-piece touring band, the five played 34 songs in seven seamless but distinct "micro-sets" (Welch's term)
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