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Emperor

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Animated puppetry has a long history in films, and although the California Raisins and the recent video release Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas have set new standards in sophistication, the basic technique has been around for years. Today's practitioners owe a debt to the Czech filmmaker Jiri Trnka, who distinguished himself in the post-WWII years as a pioneer in puppet animation. To see the extent of that debt, one need only turn to the 1948 production The Emperor's Nightingale (70 minutes, $24.98)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1990 | By Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
Initially amusing but too soon relentless, Richard Condon's "Emperor of America" (Simon & Schuster) is a satiric blast at the Reagan presidency. It comes, sadly, as too much, too late. Caesare (Chay) Appleton is a short guy who wears his homburg sideways and his military medals spread across his chest. These and all other parallels to Napoleon are intentionally drawn, for Chay becomes the first Emperor of America - elected yet. It's all the work of Wambly Keifetz IV, a proud-to-be-an-American businessman, "the publicly invisible leader of the American Yuppie Movement," who sets off a nuclear device that eradicates Washington.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Storybook Musical Theater opened its spring season yesterday with the classic fairy tale The Emperor's New Clothes, about the clothes-conscious monarch who falls prey to an incredible flim-flam. Two unscrupulous weavers persuade the emperor to buy clothes made of what they call a cloth so special that it can be seen only by the wisest and most intelligent of people, those worthy of viewing his royal highness. The cloth, of course, consists of nothing. So the emperor proceeds to embarrass himself in front of his subjects by parading down the town's main street in the nude.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Laura King and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
TOKYO - His voice was measured, his language formal, his demeanor somber. It was perhaps the clearest sign yet of just how grave Japan's nuclear crisis had become: The emperor spoke. Akihito, the nation's 77-year-old sovereign, delivered an unprecedented address to his people Wednesday in which he urged calm, perseverance, and solidarity in "the difficult days that lie ahead. " As the prerecorded speech was broadcast, workers redoubled their frantic efforts to stave off a catastrophic meltdown at a nuclear complex on Japan's northern coast, devastated five days earlier by an earthquake and tsunami.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Over the years, Hollywood has conditioned us to believe that an epic film with a huge cast, staged battles and exotic locations requires an equally epic hero to brave the wrath of men and gods. Nobody has ever dreamed of framing an epic around the life of a victim instead of a victor. Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor is a triumph in its own right that takes precisely that risk. The story of Pu Yi, the emperor of China forced into a progressive abdication of royal powers, marks the restoration of one of the world's most gifted directors to his rightful place after a barren seven- year period in which his career has faltered.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - Lederhosen-clad Tyrolean guardsmen hoisted Otto von Habsburg's coffin onto their shoulders Saturday, carrying the oldest son of Austria's last emperor to rest in a pomp-filled ceremony evocative of the country's past grandeur as a ruler of much of Europe. Austria shed its imperial past after it lost World War I. But for six hours, the pageantry, color, and ceremony accompanying the Habsburg burial turned downtown Vienna into the imperial city that was once the hub of the Austro-Hungarian empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2005 | By JACK MATHEWS New York Daily News
The second half of Antoine de Caunes' "Monsieur N.," about the post-exile life and death of Napoleon, plays less like a movie than a suggestion for one. This is a great disappointment because the first half is very cinematic and very compelling. At a leisurely pace, we are introduced to the proud and strong-willed emperor (Philippe Torreton), his entourage of French loyalists and the leaders of the 3,000-man British encampment guarding him. The movie sets up a battle of wit and will between Napoleon and the ambitious new British governor (Richard E. Grant)
NEWS
September 19, 2006
Editor's note: Here are excepts from the speech given by Pope Benedict XVI at the University of Regensburg in Germany on Sept. 12 titled "Faith, Reason and the University: Memories and Reflections. " For a text of the full speech: http://go.philly.com/popespeech. It is a moving experience for me to be back again in the university and to be able once again to give a lecture at this podium. I think back to those years . . . when I began teaching at the University of Bonn.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Orlov, 66, of Berwyn, a retired college professor so commanding in the classroom a student once dubbed him "the Emperor of English," died Tuesday, April 8, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Orlov was an associate professor emeritus of English and American studies at Pennsylvania State University's Brandywine campus in Media. He was known for his interpretations of the novels of Theodore Dreiser from philosophical and sociological perspectives. Dr. Orlov authored a book on Dreiser's An American Tragedy published by Bucknell University Press, along with numerous articles in journals and book chapters.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
IN "THE EMPEROR'S New Clothes," a preening monarch is hoodwinked into believing that he's just bought a magnificent outfit when all he's been sold is a bill of (dry) goods. Prancing around in what he thinks is cloth of gold, the emperor is complimented by his obsequious subjects. They all would have lived happily ever after had a young boy not pointed his finger and said "he's naked!" I love that story for what it tells us about the human capacity for self-delusion. We often believe what our hearts suggest despite the clear and urgent message relayed by facts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014
SORRY, you've been lied to. Forty is not the new 30, and there is no surgery, cream, magic elixir, age-proofing diet or fountain of youth. Exercise, I'm afraid, is not a cure-all. In our youth-obsessed culture, we resist the inevitability of change. Even worse, we want guarantees that if we eat the "right diet" and do the "right exercises" we will not only bypass aging and avoid diseases, we will ultimately cheat death itself. A few weeks ago I overheard a conversation between two women who were grappling with the sudden death of a dear friend.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul A. Orlov, 66, of Berwyn, a retired college professor so commanding in the classroom a student once dubbed him "the Emperor of English," died Tuesday, April 8, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Orlov was an associate professor emeritus of English and American studies at Pennsylvania State University's Brandywine campus in Media. He was known for his interpretations of the novels of Theodore Dreiser from philosophical and sociological perspectives. Dr. Orlov authored a book on Dreiser's An American Tragedy published by Bucknell University Press, along with numerous articles in journals and book chapters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
No opera takes well to being caged. But in The Emperor of Atlantis , produced by Curtis Opera Theatre last weekend, the innate expansiveness of opera couldn't have been more appropriately contained than by a chain-link fence erected inside Curtis' studio theater - and not just because the piece was written in the Nazis' Terezin concentration camp. Inside the fence, singers were knee-deep in trash. Outside, authority figures came, went, and made proclamations without necessarily being physically present, through impersonal phone lines.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
IN "THE EMPEROR'S New Clothes," a preening monarch is hoodwinked into believing that he's just bought a magnificent outfit when all he's been sold is a bill of (dry) goods. Prancing around in what he thinks is cloth of gold, the emperor is complimented by his obsequious subjects. They all would have lived happily ever after had a young boy not pointed his finger and said "he's naked!" I love that story for what it tells us about the human capacity for self-delusion. We often believe what our hearts suggest despite the clear and urgent message relayed by facts.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
TOMMY LEE Jones, a recent Oscar nominee as fire-breathing abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens, in "Lincoln," returns to historical drama in "Emperor. " He breathes no fire, but he does smoke a pipe as legendary WWII general Douglas MacArthur, in charge of the occupying American army in post-war Japan. This sounds like it should be great fun, for Jones fans and for WWII junkies, but there is really none to be had in the tepid "Emperor. " In fact, I think it's fair to say that Jones gives a better performance in in his Ameriprise financial commercials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Postwar Japan. Tokyo in ruins. U.S. soldiers arriving to take charge. "Let's show them some good old-fashioned American swagger," barks Douglas MacArthur, the five-star general in command of rebuilding the nation he has just destroyed, as he and his officers make their way from the air base to their new HQ. Tommy Lee Jones, in baggy Army browns, puffing on an extra-long corncob pipe, does his best to approximate the storied military man. ...
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | Reviewed by Nick Cristiano
Ernie K-Doe The R&B Emperor of New Orleans By Ben Sandmel The Historical New Orleans Collection. 304 pp. $39.95   Ernie K-Doe, "the R&B Emperor of New Orleans"? That's a pretty grandiose title for someone who, to the outside world, was a one-hit wonder — even if that 1961 smash, "Mother-in-Law," became the first recording by a Crescent City artist to top both the rhythm-and-blues and pop charts. When it comes to New Orleans R&B royalty, people are more likely to think of names such as Allen Toussaint (who wrote and produced "Mother-in-Law")
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
VIENNA, Austria - Lederhosen-clad Tyrolean guardsmen hoisted Otto von Habsburg's coffin onto their shoulders Saturday, carrying the oldest son of Austria's last emperor to rest in a pomp-filled ceremony evocative of the country's past grandeur as a ruler of much of Europe. Austria shed its imperial past after it lost World War I. But for six hours, the pageantry, color, and ceremony accompanying the Habsburg burial turned downtown Vienna into the imperial city that was once the hub of the Austro-Hungarian empire.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By Mari Yamaguchi and Tomoko Hosaka, Associated Press
TOKYO - Japan's respected emperor visited the country's earthquake- and tsunami-ravaged disaster zone for the first time Thursday as frustration rose over the nation's inability to gain control over a crisis at a nuclear plant crippled by the twin disasters. Even as the month-old emergency dragged on, radiation levels dropped enough for police sealed in white protective suits, goggles, and blue gloves to begin searching for bodies amid the muddy debris inside a six-mile radius around the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant that had been off-limits.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Laura King and Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
TOKYO - His voice was measured, his language formal, his demeanor somber. It was perhaps the clearest sign yet of just how grave Japan's nuclear crisis had become: The emperor spoke. Akihito, the nation's 77-year-old sovereign, delivered an unprecedented address to his people Wednesday in which he urged calm, perseverance, and solidarity in "the difficult days that lie ahead. " As the prerecorded speech was broadcast, workers redoubled their frantic efforts to stave off a catastrophic meltdown at a nuclear complex on Japan's northern coast, devastated five days earlier by an earthquake and tsunami.
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