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BUSINESS
March 27, 1992 | the Inquirer staff
DREXEL OFFICIALS CENSURED The New York Stock Exchange yesterday censured three former senior officials at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. for inadequate supervision during a period when crimes were committed at the firm. Former chairman and chief executive Robert E. Linton also was barred from associating with any NYSE-member securities firm for one year. Former senior executive vice president Edwin Kantor was barred from a supervisory job for one year, and Joseph A. Vitanza, a former Drexel president and chief administrative officer, was barred from the industry for 30 days.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | By Robert W. Fowler, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph C. Reedman Jr., whose used-car business in Langhorne mushroomed over five decades into one of the largest and most innovative new automobile dealerships in the country, died Thursday at St. Mary Hospital in Middletown, Bucks County. "He was a legend and innovator in this business," said Bob Ebert, who worked with Mr. Reedman for 39 years and now is the firm's operation manager. Mr. Reedman began operating the mall concept of selling cars - several showrooms in close proximity - decades before it was successfully imitated by others.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob McMurtrie was a smart, lanky kid with eyes for bigger places than Two Street, the hard-bitten pocket of South Philadelphia where he came from. At 22, McMurtrie set out on a journey of unfathomable distance in pursuit of glitter and riches. From Two Street, he traveled to Center City, where he got a job in 1964 as a clerk in a real estate office. He worked hard and kept his eye out for opportunities. By 1990, he'd stitched together a small empire. His assets were $29 million.
NEWS
September 28, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
A state grand jury is focusing on possible tax fraud in an investigation of the lavish lifestyles of Jessica Hahn and the Long Island preacher she served as secretary, the New York Post reported today. Two people who identified themselves as Hahn's former lovers say they were called to testify before the grand jury in Albany last week, the Post said. They told the newspaper they testified that Hahn was in love with the preacher, the Rev. Gene Profeta of the Full Gospel Tabernacle Church in Massapequa, and that her lifestyle seemed far above what she could afford on her $80-a-week salary.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By David Johnston, Michael E. Ruane and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings, correspondent Bill Sokolic and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Three top executives of developer Donald Trump's Atlantic City casino empire were killed yesterday when their helicopter lost its main rotor and crashed on the wooded median strip of the Garden State Parkway about two miles north of the Barnegat toll plaza. The helicopter's pilot and co-pilot also were killed in the crash, which occurred shortly before 2 p.m. about 30 miles north of Atlantic City. Witnesses said they heard a loud bang and saw the sleek, Italian-made helicopter's 36-foot main rotor stop spinning and then "pop" off. The craft, flying at 2,800 feet and probably traveling about 150 m.p.h.
LIVING
March 20, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
On the outside, it looks like a standard Cinnaminson Colonial, vintage 1960s. The only indication of anything unusual is a front door painted in purest lavender in a neighborhood of more standard beiges, browns and an occasional red. Step inside that door, however, and nothing is a bit ordinary. Anna and Joseph Tumas have created an enchanted European cottage within these all-American walls, a testament to Anna Tumas' German roots - and to her uncanny knack for filling interior spaces with extraordinary finds from yard sales and flea markets.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
I AM DISHEARTENED and saddened to see the state of our country. A man can become president in 2000 in a Machiavellian fashion, lead our country into a war that is not warranted, and it's then proven that any possible reason to fight has been fabricated. Manufacturing jobs are being shipped overseas faster than the richest people in our country get their tax cuts. Crime rates are rising as police are being taken off the streets. Schools are allegedly passing standardized testing, yet ask any younger person who their elected leaders are or what Congress does or even about their future credit report that will make or break their adult lives - and see their repsonse.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2010 | byline w
A Who's Who guide to the quasi-historical world of HBO's "Boardwalk Empire": ENOCH "NUCKY" THOMPSON Nucky (Steve Buscemi), a character based on longtime Atlantic City Republican boss Enoch "Nucky" Johnson, is a charming widower with a wandering eye, a jealous mistress and a vision of what the resort town he rules could become with the advent of Prohibition: a place where vacationers willing to pay almost anything for a drink will flock to do...
FOOD
August 4, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When developer Bart Blatstein locked chef Shola Olunloyo out of the Piazza at Schmidts in March, it was a shot heard round the Philadelphia food world. After countless delays, Speck Food + Wine - a stunning open kitchen more like a theater than a restaurant - would not open. It was not the first time Olunloyo's widely publicized plans had not come to fruition. Indeed, Olunloyo may be the most buzzed-about chef who has never opened a restaurant. In contrast, Tony Rim, 38, who recently opened Raw at the Piazza in that space, is quietly building a restaurant empire with very little buzz.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
By George Ball My fellow Americans: This weekend, we celebrate our country's independence and pay homage to the founders. As we glory in America, however, we tend to overlook the second part of the equation: Great Britain. In declaring independence, we broke from British rule while inventing a nation inspired by British ideas. It was Thomas Paine, an antimonarchical Englishman, who urged the Americans to sever ties with Britain in his 1776 pamphlet "Common Sense. " Just seven months before the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, Thomas Jefferson, its principal author, wrote to an English friend, "Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British Empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament propose; and, in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.
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