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NEWS
February 10, 1995 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Montgomery County Commissioners yesterday voted against conducting a formal investigation into political fund-raising among county employees by the local Republican Party. Voting 2-1 along party lines, the commission declined to support the motion for an investigation brought by the commission's sole Democrat, Joseph M. Hoeffel. "We have to hope that the publicity this issue has received will change things," Commissioner Richard Buckman said. "What are we going to do? Punish employees?"
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Think of Chief Clerk Nick Melair as the county's one-man ethics squad, the bureaucrat-cum-private-eye who will be checking out reports of shady behavior on the part of county employees. Speaking of the former Cheltenham Township manager's integrity in glowing terms, the county commissioners at Thursday's meeting empowered Melair to investigate any suspected violations of the county's employee ethics code. The commissioners did so by approving the addition of just two more sentences to the employee handbook - the rule book for the county's 2,800 workers.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | By Brian Wingfield, Bloomberg News
Workers who gripe about the boss or their colleagues on Facebook may again be at risk of getting fired unless a U.S. appeals court decision is reversed. The National Labor Relations Board ruled last year that employees can use social media to complain or comment on management, without retribution. The decision was among 220 issued in 2012 by the five-member board, three of whose appointments were ruled invalid last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington. "It puts all of the board's actions into question," said Jeffrey Hirsch, a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law. "If you're an employee who's been fired, and you want your job back, you're not going to get it until this is resolved.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Exposure might have been what nearly two dozen Montgomery County sheriff's deputies wanted when they orchestrated a "sick-out" Monday in protest of the county commissioners' attempts to block them from unionizing. But what they got yesterday went far beyond publicity. Because the protest left officials scrambling to cover courtroom security, the commissioners announced that they intend to change the rules governing when employees can take personal days. From now on, the commissioners said, anyone who wants to take a day off must get prior approval from his or her supervisor.
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hiring good help and keeping them happy are among several topics that will headline a Jan. 26 seminar for small businesses planning to expand their operations. Expansion poses several hurdles for small business owners who want to grow while keeping down costs: some do not know where to look for help, others find workers who are not qualified, and some do not offer retraining programs. For established businesses, the seminar also will discuss procedures for handling employee grievances, preparing an employee handbook and orienting and training employees.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | By Diane Mastrull, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Franklin Township's employees have met with representatives of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) as a first step toward collective bargaining. Their interest in unionizing comes as township officials begin developing job descriptions for the employees in Municipal Hall and the Streets and Sanitation Departments. The 23-member Police Department already is organized under the Police Benevolent Association. AFSCME officials reportedly met last Thursday with township employees at the Ramada Inn in Vineland to answer procedural questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have been with my boyfriend for a little over two years. He recently mentioned that when he was younger (19), he had a threesome (two guys, one girl). We are both over 35, so I realize this happened many years ago, but the fact that it was two guys is hard for me. I can't seem to get it out of my head. I keep seeing the images. I try to tell myself my boyfriend is a different man today than the teen he was. I don't understand why it's bothering me so much. How can I find a way to get past this?
NEWS
April 25, 1988 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
We are about to give away a trade secret: the Cookie-Monster-pretends-to- eat-a-cookie technique. It is brought to you courtesy of Lynne Alvino, impersonator extraordinaire of Cookie Monster, Bert, Ernie and the Honkers. Here's how it works for Alvino, 20, an elementary-education major at Rider College in Lawrenceville, N.J., who works summers at Sesame Place in Langhorne: As the child shoves the cookie at her mouth, Alvino puts her furry blue paw to her face and palms the cookie while pretending to munch furiously.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1995 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
Accustomed to traveling in packs, a energetic group of young maids crowds into Jackie Jones' blue convertible each morning, ready to cruise around the suburbs on an express house-cleaning mission. They arrive at the doors of mansions, as well as humbler abodes, with buckets, rags and sponges in hand. The women are Cleanbusters. Started 10 years ago as a one-woman maid service, Cleanbusters has expanded into an operation that services 400 homes a month in the Delaware County and Main Line area.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Donald J. Richardson is used to people taking shots at him. Not long ago, he was playing quarterback for Oberlin College in Ohio behind a mediocre offensive line, dodging beefy pass-rushers whose job it was to make him part of the turf. Sometimes, they succeeded. The behemoths from rival Denison, for example, knocked him out of the game with a concussion - not once, but three years in a row. So he hasn't let it shake him that many of the Montgomery County officials with whom he works each day think his job should be abolished.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 29, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
URBAN Outfitters, you're breaking my heart. I'd loved you since I discovered your lone West Philly shop when I was in college. You'd just changed your name from the Free People Store, and your countercultural merchandise spoke to my giddy dreams of a boho life. I was smitten the day I bought an Indian-print cotton bedspread from you to sew into curtains for my first-ever single-girl apartment. "Where'd you get them?" friends would ask, eyeing my handiwork. "Urban," I'd say, knowing the word had become code for "I may be broke, but at least I'm hip. " God, I was young.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I have been with my boyfriend for a little over two years. He recently mentioned that when he was younger (19), he had a threesome (two guys, one girl). We are both over 35, so I realize this happened many years ago, but the fact that it was two guys is hard for me. I can't seem to get it out of my head. I keep seeing the images. I try to tell myself my boyfriend is a different man today than the teen he was. I don't understand why it's bothering me so much. How can I find a way to get past this?
BUSINESS
January 31, 2013 | By Brian Wingfield, Bloomberg News
Workers who gripe about the boss or their colleagues on Facebook may again be at risk of getting fired unless a U.S. appeals court decision is reversed. The National Labor Relations Board ruled last year that employees can use social media to complain or comment on management, without retribution. The decision was among 220 issued in 2012 by the five-member board, three of whose appointments were ruled invalid last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington. "It puts all of the board's actions into question," said Jeffrey Hirsch, a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law. "If you're an employee who's been fired, and you want your job back, you're not going to get it until this is resolved.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | By Meredith Fischer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Exposure might have been what nearly two dozen Montgomery County sheriff's deputies wanted when they orchestrated a "sick-out" Monday in protest of the county commissioners' attempts to block them from unionizing. But what they got yesterday went far beyond publicity. Because the protest left officials scrambling to cover courtroom security, the commissioners announced that they intend to change the rules governing when employees can take personal days. From now on, the commissioners said, anyone who wants to take a day off must get prior approval from his or her supervisor.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although his memories have been breached by time, it's easy for Donald Gapp to recall those summers nearly 70 years ago. He was then a young member of John Wanamaker's private army of cadets on this wide bluff where the Barnegat Bay and the Toms River marry in a swirl of deep blue. That first summer in 1927, the handsome, brown-eyed Gapp, just 18, was transformed from a city-dwelling dress-shirt salesman in the men's department at Wanamaker's Philadelphia store to a tall-walking sousaphone player in the John Wanamaker Cadet Infantry encamped along the bayfront.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1995 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
Accustomed to traveling in packs, a energetic group of young maids crowds into Jackie Jones' blue convertible each morning, ready to cruise around the suburbs on an express house-cleaning mission. They arrive at the doors of mansions, as well as humbler abodes, with buckets, rags and sponges in hand. The women are Cleanbusters. Started 10 years ago as a one-woman maid service, Cleanbusters has expanded into an operation that services 400 homes a month in the Delaware County and Main Line area.
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Think of Chief Clerk Nick Melair as the county's one-man ethics squad, the bureaucrat-cum-private-eye who will be checking out reports of shady behavior on the part of county employees. Speaking of the former Cheltenham Township manager's integrity in glowing terms, the county commissioners at Thursday's meeting empowered Melair to investigate any suspected violations of the county's employee ethics code. The commissioners did so by approving the addition of just two more sentences to the employee handbook - the rule book for the county's 2,800 workers.
NEWS
February 10, 1995 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Montgomery County Commissioners yesterday voted against conducting a formal investigation into political fund-raising among county employees by the local Republican Party. Voting 2-1 along party lines, the commission declined to support the motion for an investigation brought by the commission's sole Democrat, Joseph M. Hoeffel. "We have to hope that the publicity this issue has received will change things," Commissioner Richard Buckman said. "What are we going to do? Punish employees?"
NEWS
January 10, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hiring good help and keeping them happy are among several topics that will headline a Jan. 26 seminar for small businesses planning to expand their operations. Expansion poses several hurdles for small business owners who want to grow while keeping down costs: some do not know where to look for help, others find workers who are not qualified, and some do not offer retraining programs. For established businesses, the seminar also will discuss procedures for handling employee grievances, preparing an employee handbook and orienting and training employees.
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Donald J. Richardson is used to people taking shots at him. Not long ago, he was playing quarterback for Oberlin College in Ohio behind a mediocre offensive line, dodging beefy pass-rushers whose job it was to make him part of the turf. Sometimes, they succeeded. The behemoths from rival Denison, for example, knocked him out of the game with a concussion - not once, but three years in a row. So he hasn't let it shake him that many of the Montgomery County officials with whom he works each day think his job should be abolished.
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