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Employer Mandate

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BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Mark V. Pauly, For The Inquirer
The Obama administration has given employers a reprieve from the mandate that they offer their workers insurance at low employee premiums or pay a penalty. The enforcement is postponed until 2016. But should the mandate ever come back? Even strong supporters of the Affordable Care Act are divided. David Blumenthal, of the Commonwealth Fund, says the mandate on employers is needed to compel them to honor their "shared responsibility" to pay their workers' premiums. Tim Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a leading backer and interpreter of the complex ACA rules, says the mandate has too many adverse side effects and should be "repealed and replaced" by something else.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The key financing provision of President Clinton's plan to guarantee health insurance for all is in jeopardy as congressional committees begin trying to craft a bill that can become law. Moderate Democrats on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee say the votes aren't there for Clinton's "employer mandate" - a requirement that employers pay most of workers' health premiums. That mandate is deemed especially onerous to small business, which has marshaled its formidable political clout in opposition to Clinton's plan.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
THE OBAMA administration's decision to postpone a significant part of the Affordable Care Act doesn't mean that the law is collapsing, as its opponents have proclaimed. Many important provisions are already in place, and more are on schedule to be phased in this year. But the announcement that enforcement of the employer mandate will be pushed back a year, until 2015, does indicate how complex a job it is to get the law into place, especially in the face of determined opposition from Republicans in Congress and state legislatures.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-led House voted on Wednesday to delay core provisions of President Obama's health-care law, emboldened by the administration's concession that requiring companies to provide coverage for their workers next year may be too complicated. After a day of heated rhetoric, the House voted largely along party lines, 264-161, to delay by one year the so-called employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act. It voted 251-174 to extend a similar grace period to virtually all Americans who will be required to obtain coverage beginning Jan. 1, the linchpin of the law. The dual political-show votes marked the 38th time the GOP majority has tried to eliminate, defund, or scale back the unpopular law since Republicans took control of the House in January 2011.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar and Brenda Rios, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Two powerful congressional panels handed President Clinton a split decision on health care yesterday, complicating his efforts to guarantee insurance coverage for all Americans. In a hard-fought victory for Clinton, the House Ways and Means Committee voted 20-18 to approve a bill that would meet the President's goal of coverage for all and require employers to help pay for workers' health insurance. The vote gives comprehensive health-care reform a fighting chance of passing the House, but does not guarantee it. "I don't know if it's a giant step or a baby step," said Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D., Ill.)
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Jay Hancock, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Like businesses across the country, Angelo's restaurant has been recovering from a miserable economy, a load of debt, and a bottom line that until recently was the color of its special marinara sauce. So owner Michael Passalacqua probably speaks for many when he expresses relief about the decision to delay enforcing until 2015 the Affordable Care Act's mandate for employer health insurance. That was one challenge he didn't need next year, he said. He's glad for the extra time to figure out whether his Washington, Pa., restaurant must conform to the law and, if so, how. "It's nothing but a noose hanging right over my head," Passalacqua said.
NEWS
December 4, 1993 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
Convincing employers they should pay for most of their employees' health insurance coverage will be President Clinton's toughest fight in garnering approval for his reform plan, Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala said yesterday. "It's really going to center around the employer mandate," she said in a phone interview. "Everyone wants coverage and everyone wants choice . . . Everyone has to pay something if we want universal coverage. If we don't, we're left with what we have now and that means the rest of us have to pick up the tab for people who don't pay at all. " Under Clinton's plan, every employer would pay at least 80 percent of workers' health-care coverage.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Pollsters and academic researchers say the daily language of the health- care debate - loaded with jargon like "universal coverage," "employer mandate," "health alliance" and "single payer" - is incomprehensible to a significant number of Americans. That means the most important social policy debate in decades is taking place in a cloud of misperception and misunderstanding. "All the surveys show that people are paying a great deal of attention to health care," said Robert Blendon, who heads the health policy department at the Harvard School of Public Health and who specializes in tracking public attitudes toward health-care reform.
NEWS
October 24, 2009
Call it what it is - rape In Wednesday's "Side Show" column, you described Roman Polanski's offense as "having sex with" a 13-year-old girl. "Having sex" is not a crime, and the term implies consent. What Polanski did was rape. I am disappointed in your newspaper for running this story with a watered-down description that minimizes the seriousness of his crime. Meg L. Walker Bordentown Good things from constitution session Contrary to the negative headline, some extremely positive developments emerged from the Pennsylvania Bar Association's special meeting Monday on constitutional reform ("No push for constitutional commission," Tuesday)
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
After months of attacking virtually every major initiative of the Clinton administration, Senate Republican leader Bob Dole adopted a conciliatory tone yesterday and said he wanted to cooperate with the President on health-care reform. Dole's stance, signaled in an address to the nation's governors, is significant because President Clinton has little chance of overhauling the nation's health-care system without support from moderate Republicans. One reason that Clinton's presidency has gotten off to a rocky start is that Republicans - led by Dole - have been unified in opposing Clinton's programs, particularly his tax and spending policies.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Mark V. Pauly, For The Inquirer
The Obama administration has given employers a reprieve from the mandate that they offer their workers insurance at low employee premiums or pay a penalty. The enforcement is postponed until 2016. But should the mandate ever come back? Even strong supporters of the Affordable Care Act are divided. David Blumenthal, of the Commonwealth Fund, says the mandate on employers is needed to compel them to honor their "shared responsibility" to pay their workers' premiums. Tim Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a leading backer and interpreter of the complex ACA rules, says the mandate has too many adverse side effects and should be "repealed and replaced" by something else.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Jay Hancock, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Like businesses across the country, Angelo's restaurant has been recovering from a miserable economy, a load of debt, and a bottom line that until recently was the color of its special marinara sauce. So owner Michael Passalacqua probably speaks for many when he expresses relief about the decision to delay enforcing until 2015 the Affordable Care Act's mandate for employer health insurance. That was one challenge he didn't need next year, he said. He's glad for the extra time to figure out whether his Washington, Pa., restaurant must conform to the law and, if so, how. "It's nothing but a noose hanging right over my head," Passalacqua said.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Republican-led House voted on Wednesday to delay core provisions of President Obama's health-care law, emboldened by the administration's concession that requiring companies to provide coverage for their workers next year may be too complicated. After a day of heated rhetoric, the House voted largely along party lines, 264-161, to delay by one year the so-called employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act. It voted 251-174 to extend a similar grace period to virtually all Americans who will be required to obtain coverage beginning Jan. 1, the linchpin of the law. The dual political-show votes marked the 38th time the GOP majority has tried to eliminate, defund, or scale back the unpopular law since Republicans took control of the House in January 2011.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
THE OBAMA administration's decision to postpone a significant part of the Affordable Care Act doesn't mean that the law is collapsing, as its opponents have proclaimed. Many important provisions are already in place, and more are on schedule to be phased in this year. But the announcement that enforcement of the employer mandate will be pushed back a year, until 2015, does indicate how complex a job it is to get the law into place, especially in the face of determined opposition from Republicans in Congress and state legislatures.
NEWS
October 24, 2009
Call it what it is - rape In Wednesday's "Side Show" column, you described Roman Polanski's offense as "having sex with" a 13-year-old girl. "Having sex" is not a crime, and the term implies consent. What Polanski did was rape. I am disappointed in your newspaper for running this story with a watered-down description that minimizes the seriousness of his crime. Meg L. Walker Bordentown Good things from constitution session Contrary to the negative headline, some extremely positive developments emerged from the Pennsylvania Bar Association's special meeting Monday on constitutional reform ("No push for constitutional commission," Tuesday)
NEWS
September 2, 1994
The health-reform obituaries stack up like cordwood. There is almost a gleefulness - and, for sure, a sameness - about them: The President's health planner, Ira Magaziner, was a mad genius - and politically tone-deaf to boot. The Clinton plan itself was a monster, bred in Manhattan Project-like secrecy, devoid of passion. Every provider group got stuff in - but the Congressional Budget Office, unfortunately, tallied up the cost. NAFTA, Haiti and Bosnia took the presidential eye off the ball.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Nearly 50 years after President Harry S. Truman first proposed national health insurance, Congress is about to begin floor debates on whether all Americans have the right to cradle-to-grave medical coverage. Health insurance is part of the social safety net in every other major democracy. In the United States - a country founded on the idea of limited government - generations of health reformers have been thwarted by the opposition of powerful interests and a deep suspicion of "socialized medicine.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Senate Democratic leader George J. Mitchell said yesterday that he would boost taxes on cigarettes and tobacco products to pay for the compromise health-care reform plan he is to announce today. Meanwhile President Clinton addressed a rally in New Jersey and announced a rare prime-time news conference in a bid to salvage his top legislative priority. In an interview with CNN last night, Mitchell declined to spell out exactly how much he would hike such taxes, but said it would be in the range of a House proposal that would phase in a 45-cents-a-pack increase.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | By DAVID S. BRODER
The puzzlement created by President Clinton's seeming retreat last week from key parts of his national health plan is less mysterious if you remember one fact: Bill Clinton was a governor for 12 years; he has been President for only 18 months. When he rejoins the governors, as he did last Tuesday, flying into Boston for the final session of the summer meeting of the National Governors' Association (NGA), Clinton reverts to form. And it gets him into trouble in Washington - which says more about Washington than it does about Bill Clinton.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said yesterday that he might back off his demand that employers shoulder most of the health-care costs for all employees if it eventually resulted in universal health care. Clinton's apparent concession came on a day that he and his archrival on health care, Senate Republican leader Bob Dole, struck conciliatory notes in separate speeches here before the National Governors' Association. Dole said that Republicans were willing to stay in session through the summer on the issue and that he might drop his insistence on caps on federal Medicaid reimbursement - caps that some states fear would increase their financial burden.
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