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BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Towers Watson & Co. , a corporate-consulting firm based in New York, says it plans to hire 400 people over the next two years for a new call center it is creating in Mount Laurel, to handle calls for its OneExchange unit. OneExchange is one of the private online health-insurance markets set up in response to the Affordable Care Act . Most states have established their own exchanges or adopted the federal government's model. "It's a huge step for us," Frank Giampietro , Center City-based head of Towers Watson's Philadelphia region, told me. The company also employs 650 in Center City (at the former headquarters of predecessor Towers Perrin)
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
December 10, 2014
IN AN IDEAL world, all workers would get paid a living wage and get employer-provided health care, sick leave and a retirement plan. But, this is not France. We live in America, the land of the free - where employers are free to offer low-wage jobs without benefits. The old theory of a rising tide lifting all boats doesn't apply in this case. As the economy has climbed out of the recession, the data tell us that the rich are getting richer while the poor are still underwater.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Over the objections of business groups, a bill that would bar employers from checking a job seeker's criminal history during the application process was advanced Monday by an Assembly committee. Republican lawmakers opposed the bill, which cleared the Labor Committee by a 6-3 vote along party lines. An identical bill has yet to be taken up by Senate lawmakers. Under the bill, employers would not be able to conduct a criminal-background check on an applicant until they extended a conditional offer of employment.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Companies advertised the most job openings in nearly three years, a hopeful sign after the worst month for hiring in nearly a year. The Labor Department says employers posted 3.2 million jobs in July, up from 3.17 million in June. That is the largest number of openings since August 2008. Typically, it takes anywhere from one to three months to fill an opening. There's heavy competition for each job. Nearly 14 million people were out of work in July, so roughly 4.3 unemployed workers were competing for each opening.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 25 employers will be on hand for a job fair on Oct. 25 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the William H. Gray Youth Center, 12th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Employers include Temple University, Kensington Hospital, the Philadelphia Police Department, SEPTA, UPS, Einstein Healthcare Network, Wells Fargo and LIFT-Philadelphia. "The statistics on unemployed and underemployed residents in Philadelphia continue to be at a record high," said state Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, sponsor of the annual job fair.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Job-application forms are about to change in Philadelphia. City Council yesterday approved legislation that would block most employers from asking about an applicant's criminal history until after an initial job interview. Known as the "Ban the Box" bill, the measure was sponsored by Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller in hopes that it would help increase employment opportunities for ex-offenders. Similar legislation has been passed in a number of cities and states, including Chicago, Atlanta and Boston.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
It's a shame that some employers are making it harder for the jobless to find work. In a disturbing trend, a growing number of employers are telling the unemployed not to apply. Being either currently or recently employed has become an eligibility requirement. With 12.8 million Americans out of work and a national unemployment rate of 8.3 percent, employers should openly embrace those seeking to return to the workforce. Instead, they are punishing them for gaps in their resume due to no fault of their own. Eliminating applicants based on their employment status unfairly screens out millions of people, based not on their skill set but on their misfortunes.
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