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BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freelancers, independent contractors, consultants, day laborers working off the books for cash, contingent workers, temps, virtual assistants, free agents. These are the names for the ever-growing part of America's labor force with an interesting distinction. They aren't employees. Or at least, they aren't on the payrolls of the companies where they spend their days (or work from home) answering phones, installing drywall, conducting research, delivering packages, engineering bridges, staffing help desks, researching logistics issues, writing Internet copy, implementing new software, cleaning toilets.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
NEWS
January 12, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com215-854-2656
A prominent Huntingdon Valley lawyer was sentenced Thursday to 30 months in a federal lockup in connection with a scheme to fraudulently obtain "green cards" for immigration clients. Michael Choi, 56, was convicted by a federal jury in August of conspiracy to violate immigration laws, making false statements to the government and filing false tax returns for the years 2005 and 2006. U.S. District Judge Petrese B. Tucker also ordered Choi to make restitution to the IRS of $161,539.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2012 | By Robb Mandelbaum and New York Times News Service
In April, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) signaled a crackdown on employers that use criminal histories to discriminate against job applicants illegally. But to judge from conversations with business owners, labor lawyers, and human-resources consultants, many small businesses had no idea there was anything wrong with practices like a blanket ban on hiring anybody with a criminal record. "Many companies that size don't have an HR person and get minimal education about compliance issues," said Laurence E. Stuart, a labor lawyer in Houston.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes the facts are easy: A 39-year-old mother of four raising her family on welfare and food stamps finds a check next to a Dumpster. Her monthly welfare payment is days away, and there is no food in the house. She signs it, committing fraud. "I went home and told my kids, 'God sent me a piece of paper that says we're going to eat tonight.' " That happened to Evelyn Houser, now 70, of North Philadelphia in 1981. In 2010, that conviction - her only brush with the law - meant she wasn't considered for a temporary U.S. Census job. "It's like a slap in the face," she said.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Over the objections of business groups, a bill that would bar employers from checking a job seeker's criminal history during the application process was advanced Monday by an Assembly committee. Republican lawmakers opposed the bill, which cleared the Labor Committee by a 6-3 vote along party lines. An identical bill has yet to be taken up by Senate lawmakers. Under the bill, employers would not be able to conduct a criminal-background check on an applicant until they extended a conditional offer of employment.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Companies advertised the most job openings in nearly three years, a hopeful sign after the worst month for hiring in nearly a year. The Labor Department says employers posted 3.2 million jobs in July, up from 3.17 million in June. That is the largest number of openings since August 2008. Typically, it takes anywhere from one to three months to fill an opening. There's heavy competition for each job. Nearly 14 million people were out of work in July, so roughly 4.3 unemployed workers were competing for each opening.
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