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BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the record, summer intern Neal Cook does make the coffee and empty the trash. But more significant, Cook, a Temple University sports-management major, and fellow intern David Twamley, a business major at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, have other responsibilities that might make them the envy of their copy-making, phone-answering compatriots. They are running their own business - at Front Rush L.L.C., a company that develops sports-team recruiting and compliance software in a cool old factory along the canal in Lambertville, N.J. "On our first day, we were building our own desks," Twamley said.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com215-854-5994
Business owners, take note: "Ban the Box" goes into effect Friday. Pull up a chair if you just uttered a deeply confused, "Huh? Wha?" "Ban the Box" - also known by its less-catchy official name, the Philadelphia Fair Criminal Screening Standards Ordinance - was signed into law by Mayor Nutter in April. The ordinance prohibits any business in the city that employs more than 10 people from asking job-seekers either on their application or during their first interview if they have any criminal convictions.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ty Slovak walked from the van up to the front door of the Radnor Township house Wednesday, both hands clutching a small brown teddy bear to his chest. Two shiny green "Get Well Soon" balloons attached to the bear floated above his not-quite-5-foot-4 frame. He raised a hand and knocked a few too many times. A voice from the side of the house said to come around. A driver sat in the van, ready to give him instructions if he needed. Ty hesitated, but he followed the voice to the side.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Protect us from cyclists It's hard to be against a law that formalizes a reasonable berth for motorists to give to cyclists, but it would be nice to see some legislative protection for motorists and pedestrians against this environmentally superior, ostentatiously insouciant, self-centeredly oblivious two-wheeled scourge ("New Pa. law requires drivers to give cyclists more room," Tuesday). Spend 10 minutes along any Center City bike lane and you will see cyclists ignoring traffic laws, reverting from the streets to the sidewalks when it suits them, and treating pedestrians like rubber cones on a serpentine course.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the recession's "official" end in June 2009, about 12 million people remain unemployed, with more than three jobless people for every opening, the U.S. Labor Department reports. So why do employers constantly whine about their inability to find the talent they need from an applicant pool that they say lacks skills, rudimentary educational abilities, and even a willingness to work? Sitting in his office at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli asked himself the same question.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Over the objections of business groups, a bill that would bar employers from checking a job seeker's criminal history during the application process was advanced Monday by an Assembly committee. Republican lawmakers opposed the bill, which cleared the Labor Committee by a 6-3 vote along party lines. An identical bill has yet to be taken up by Senate lawmakers. Under the bill, employers would not be able to conduct a criminal-background check on an applicant until they extended a conditional offer of employment.
NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freelancers, independent contractors, consultants, day laborers working off the books for cash, contingent workers, temps, virtual assistants, free agents. These are the names for the ever-growing part of America's labor force with an interesting distinction. They aren't employees. Or at least, they aren't on the payrolls of the companies where they spend their days (or work from home) answering phones, installing drywall, conducting research, delivering packages, engineering bridges, staffing help desks, researching logistics issues, writing Internet copy, implementing new software, cleaning toilets.
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