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NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Two large trade associations, the National Retail Federation and the National Association of Manufacturers, have come out against new regulations involving labor consultants announced Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Labor. "This unwarranted action by the Department of Labor will further restrict employers' ability to educate and inform employees on essential issues in the workplace," Jay Timmons, chief executive of the National Association of Manufacturers, said in a statement. The changes require employers to submit reports to the department when they hire consultants to help them stave off union organizing drives, even if the consultants are used only as advisers and do not directly address employees.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Business graduates will be most in demand among employers recruiting those with bachelor's degrees from the Class of 2016, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reported Thursday. "We're still hearing employers talk about the need for graduates to replace [baby boomers] who are retiring," said Andrea Koncz, research director at the Bethlehem-based association. That same concern was voiced by 60 area employers and others who gathered at Cabrini College on Tuesday for a Technology Jobs Summit sponsored by the Main Line Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
March 15, 2016 | By Brendan Lynch
When trying to get a job cleaning port-a-potties, Reuben Jones, the founder of the Philly nonprofit Frontline Dads, experienced something all too common: He was initially hired, then rejected because he had recently been incarcerated. Now, Philadelphia employers will clearly be on notice that it is improper to reject applicants for records that are old or irrelevant to the job. Today, new fair hiring rules that apply to nearly all employers take effect in Philadelphia, and they will vastly increase employment opportunities for people with criminal records.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why so slow? Pennsylvania is one of the states where fewer people are working than in 2007. This isn't quite new. Job growth here has been half the national average for the last 75 years, writes senior economist Mark Vitner and his team at Wells Fargo Securities L.L.C. , the investment arm of the Philadelphia area's dominant bank, in its yearly report reviewing the state's economy. Last year, Pennsylvania suffered layoffs at military contractors, steelmakers, drugmakers. Home prices went flat, and Philadelphia developers are building so many apartments, they are risking a glut - unless the city attracts "considerably more jobs and residents," according to Wells Fargo.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Companies advertised the most job openings in nearly three years, a hopeful sign after the worst month for hiring in nearly a year. The Labor Department says employers posted 3.2 million jobs in July, up from 3.17 million in June. That is the largest number of openings since August 2008. Typically, it takes anywhere from one to three months to fill an opening. There's heavy competition for each job. Nearly 14 million people were out of work in July, so roughly 4.3 unemployed workers were competing for each opening.
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