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NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freelancers, independent contractors, consultants, day laborers working off the books for cash, contingent workers, temps, virtual assistants, free agents. These are the names for the ever-growing part of America's labor force with an interesting distinction. They aren't employees. Or at least, they aren't on the payrolls of the companies where they spend their days (or work from home) answering phones, installing drywall, conducting research, delivering packages, engineering bridges, staffing help desks, researching logistics issues, writing Internet copy, implementing new software, cleaning toilets.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Industrial engineers might fantasize about building an ever more efficient assembly line. And advertising copywriters dream of coining a catchy slogan. People such as Pamela Shadzik, a corporate workforce development specialist, yearn to create the perfect training program - teaching the exact skills needed on the job while advancing the capabilities of employees. These days, when Shadzik has that kind of need, "I just call Cheryl," she said. Cheryl is Cheryl Feldman, executive director of the District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund, an educational program jointly funded by the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees and employers such as the Temple University Health System, where Shadzik works as director of leadership and organizational development.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON An Assembly panel advanced legislation Monday that would increase the minimum wage for New Jersey workers who make most of their money in tips, despite objections from restaurant and beverage industry officials who feared a blow to businesses. The bill would allow employers to claim credits for tips paid to employees, and, in effect, raise hourly wages from $2.13 to $5.93 by late 2015. Supporters note that the wage has not increased in two decades, even as the cost of living has risen.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com215-854-5994
Business owners, take note: "Ban the Box" goes into effect Friday. Pull up a chair if you just uttered a deeply confused, "Huh? Wha?" "Ban the Box" - also known by its less-catchy official name, the Philadelphia Fair Criminal Screening Standards Ordinance - was signed into law by Mayor Nutter in April. The ordinance prohibits any business in the city that employs more than 10 people from asking job-seekers either on their application or during their first interview if they have any criminal convictions.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Companies advertised the most job openings in nearly three years, a hopeful sign after the worst month for hiring in nearly a year. The Labor Department says employers posted 3.2 million jobs in July, up from 3.17 million in June. That is the largest number of openings since August 2008. Typically, it takes anywhere from one to three months to fill an opening. There's heavy competition for each job. Nearly 14 million people were out of work in July, so roughly 4.3 unemployed workers were competing for each opening.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 25 employers will be on hand for a job fair on Oct. 25 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the William H. Gray Youth Center, 12th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Employers include Temple University, Kensington Hospital, the Philadelphia Police Department, SEPTA, UPS, Einstein Healthcare Network, Wells Fargo and LIFT-Philadelphia. "The statistics on unemployed and underemployed residents in Philadelphia continue to be at a record high," said state Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, sponsor of the annual job fair.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifteen years ago, Capreece Lackey, 42, had steady work that she never put on her resumé. In fact, it landed her in jail, when she was arrested for prostitution next to a rusty railroad bridge in North Philadelphia. "I had no soul," said Lackey, who was convicted on the prostitution charge, as well as a lesser charge of obstruction of traffic. "I didn't care what I did. I was addicted to crack cocaine. " Lackey has been sober since 1999, but because of her criminal record, she's still paying the price in unemployment and poverty.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Job-application forms are about to change in Philadelphia. City Council yesterday approved legislation that would block most employers from asking about an applicant's criminal history until after an initial job interview. Known as the "Ban the Box" bill, the measure was sponsored by Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller in hopes that it would help increase employment opportunities for ex-offenders. Similar legislation has been passed in a number of cities and states, including Chicago, Atlanta and Boston.
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