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NEWS
May 3, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Dave Clarke wants to fill a position at AuthenticMatters in Old City, he sifts through the stack of resumes and looks up candidates on Google. He expects a presence online, he says, especially considering the company's work — digital strategy and communications consultancy. "That's your online resume," AuthenticMatters' founder says of tweets, blogs, and status updates. "It's not what you attach to an e-mail. "We're not digging for dirt or hunting for drunken photos or anything," he continues.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes the facts are easy: A 39-year-old mother of four raising her family on welfare and food stamps finds a check next to a Dumpster. Her monthly welfare payment is days away, and there is no food in the house. She signs it, committing fraud. "I went home and told my kids, 'God sent me a piece of paper that says we're going to eat tonight.' " That happened to Evelyn Houser, now 70, of North Philadelphia in 1981. In 2010, that conviction - her only brush with the law - meant she wasn't considered for a temporary U.S. Census job. "It's like a slap in the face," she said.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Over the objections of business groups, a bill that would bar employers from checking a job seeker's criminal history during the application process was advanced Monday by an Assembly committee. Republican lawmakers opposed the bill, which cleared the Labor Committee by a 6-3 vote along party lines. An identical bill has yet to be taken up by Senate lawmakers. Under the bill, employers would not be able to conduct a criminal-background check on an applicant until they extended a conditional offer of employment.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Help-desk analyst was the job title, paying in the low-$40,000 annual range. The winning candidate for the position at Reed Technology & Information Services Inc. in Horsham did not have a college degree, or even years of experience. Instead, she had completed a 16-week training program, passing a test certifying her in CompTIA A+, a commonly recognized credential in the world of technology. That, plus a five-week internship, which was part of the program, was enough to take her from "disadvantaged youth" to middle-class and employed.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Companies advertised the most job openings in nearly three years, a hopeful sign after the worst month for hiring in nearly a year. The Labor Department says employers posted 3.2 million jobs in July, up from 3.17 million in June. That is the largest number of openings since August 2008. Typically, it takes anywhere from one to three months to fill an opening. There's heavy competition for each job. Nearly 14 million people were out of work in July, so roughly 4.3 unemployed workers were competing for each opening.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 25 employers will be on hand for a job fair on Oct. 25 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the William H. Gray Youth Center, 12th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Employers include Temple University, Kensington Hospital, the Philadelphia Police Department, SEPTA, UPS, Einstein Healthcare Network, Wells Fargo and LIFT-Philadelphia. "The statistics on unemployed and underemployed residents in Philadelphia continue to be at a record high," said state Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, sponsor of the annual job fair.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
Job-application forms are about to change in Philadelphia. City Council yesterday approved legislation that would block most employers from asking about an applicant's criminal history until after an initial job interview. Known as the "Ban the Box" bill, the measure was sponsored by Councilwoman Donna Reed Miller in hopes that it would help increase employment opportunities for ex-offenders. Similar legislation has been passed in a number of cities and states, including Chicago, Atlanta and Boston.
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