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NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's paid-sick-leave law takes effect Wednesday, and city officials are encouraging workers to make sure their employers know about the new rules. Passed in February, the law requires employers with 10 or more workers to offer paid sick time. Employees who were not previously given sick leave can start accruing it at a rate of one hour of paid time per 40 hours worked. The law caps sick time at 40 hours a year, or five eight-hour days. Councilman William K. Greenlee, who pushed for the bill for more than three years, said the new law applies to 180,000 to 200,000 city residents.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Tens of thousands of times a week, according to one study, employers steal money from low-wage workers in Philadelphia. They fail to compensate them for overtime, pay them less than the minimum wage, undercount their hours, withhold their tips, or don't pay them at all. A Temple University study estimated that there are about 90,000 incidents of wage theft in the city every week, costing victims $51 to $87. That's less money for rent, food, and...
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Help-desk analyst was the job title, paying in the low-$40,000 annual range. The winning candidate for the position at Reed Technology & Information Services Inc. in Horsham did not have a college degree, or even years of experience. Instead, she had completed a 16-week training program, passing a test certifying her in CompTIA A+, a commonly recognized credential in the world of technology. That, plus a five-week internship, which was part of the program, was enough to take her from "disadvantaged youth" to middle-class and employed.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Tammy L. Gavitt
In an economy where many of us can at least tread water, Philadelphia's low-income workers are drowning. About two out of five workers in Philadelphia have no paid sick leave. In response, a City Council committee last week approved a sick-leave ordinance that would require Philadelphia businesses of six or more employees to provide a limited number of earned, paid sick days. A vote before the full Council could come as early as this week. Businesses can easily supply a nominal amount of paid sick days.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why so slow? Pennsylvania is one of the states where fewer people are working than in 2007. This isn't quite new. Job growth here has been half the national average for the last 75 years, writes senior economist Mark Vitner and his team at Wells Fargo Securities L.L.C. , the investment arm of the Philadelphia area's dominant bank, in its yearly report reviewing the state's economy. Last year, Pennsylvania suffered layoffs at military contractors, steelmakers, drugmakers. Home prices went flat, and Philadelphia developers are building so many apartments, they are risking a glut - unless the city attracts "considerably more jobs and residents," according to Wells Fargo.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ty Slovak walked from the van up to the front door of the Radnor Township house Wednesday, both hands clutching a small brown teddy bear to his chest. Two shiny green "Get Well Soon" balloons attached to the bear floated above his not-quite-5-foot-4 frame. He raised a hand and knocked a few too many times. A voice from the side of the house said to come around. A driver sat in the van, ready to give him instructions if he needed. Ty hesitated, but he followed the voice to the side.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
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