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BUSINESS
August 20, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Maybe, in principle, employers might believe in giving someone fresh out of prison a second chance by offering that person a job. But . . . How do they figure out who is actually dangerous? How do they make sense of the tangled government document that is a criminal record? How do they thread through two competing legal risks: the risk of being sued if they don't properly consider ex-offenders, versus the risk of a suit for negligent hiring if a person out of prison causes a serious problem on the job?
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Wayne Jacobs, 66, might describe himself as a career criminal gone good, or maybe gone lucky. Once people are convicted, the individual and their families are "committed to poverty," said Jacobs, whose past includes many convictions, including one for involuntary manslaughter, and decades of in-and-out incarceration. His present? Lobbying for big changes to the Philadelphia law governing when and how employers can use criminal records in hiring. The changes went into effect March 14. They make it easier for people with criminal records to get jobs.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's paid-sick-leave law takes effect Wednesday, and city officials are encouraging workers to make sure their employers know about the new rules. Passed in February, the law requires employers with 10 or more workers to offer paid sick time. Employees who were not previously given sick leave can start accruing it at a rate of one hour of paid time per 40 hours worked. The law caps sick time at 40 hours a year, or five eight-hour days. Councilman William K. Greenlee, who pushed for the bill for more than three years, said the new law applies to 180,000 to 200,000 city residents.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Towers Watson & Co. , a corporate-consulting firm based in New York, says it plans to hire 400 people over the next two years for a new call center it is creating in Mount Laurel, to handle calls for its OneExchange unit. OneExchange is one of the private online health-insurance markets set up in response to the Affordable Care Act . Most states have established their own exchanges or adopted the federal government's model. "It's a huge step for us," Frank Giampietro , Center City-based head of Towers Watson's Philadelphia region, told me. The company also employs 650 in Center City (at the former headquarters of predecessor Towers Perrin)
BUSINESS
July 12, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the record, summer intern Neal Cook does make the coffee and empty the trash. But more significant, Cook, a Temple University sports-management major, and fellow intern David Twamley, a business major at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, have other responsibilities that might make them the envy of their copy-making, phone-answering compatriots. They are running their own business - at Front Rush L.L.C., a company that develops sports-team recruiting and compliance software in a cool old factory along the canal in Lambertville, N.J. "On our first day, we were building our own desks," Twamley said.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AFTER SEVERAL months of sending out resumes and applying for jobs, all Joyce Bacon wanted was an interview - a chance to meet with an employer face-to-face to talk about her skills. Little did Bacon know that chance would come at a world-renowned medical institution, and one not far from her home - Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. In April, she was hired as a patient sitter, and recently promoted to in-patient clerk. Bacon, 36, is among dozens of West Philadelphia residents who have gotten opportunities through the West Philadelphia Skills Initiative, a job-training program created by the University City District (UCD)
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
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