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NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON An Assembly panel advanced legislation Monday that would increase the minimum wage for New Jersey workers who make most of their money in tips, despite objections from restaurant and beverage industry officials who feared a blow to businesses. The bill would allow employers to claim credits for tips paid to employees, and, in effect, raise hourly wages from $2.13 to $5.93 by late 2015. Supporters note that the wage has not increased in two decades, even as the cost of living has risen.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
NEWS
July 3, 2011
Amity Shlaes is a Bloomberg News columnist and a senior fellow in economic history at the Council on Foreign Relations Margins matter. That's what New Hampshire lawmakers were really saying to Gov. John Lynch when they overrode his veto of legislation that limits minimum-wage increases. The law ties the New Hampshire minimum wage to the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. The effect is to guarantee New Hampshire employers an advantage of between 15 cents and $1 an hour over other employers in New England, where minimum wages range from $7.40 an hour in Rhode Island to $8.25 in Connecticut.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Industrial engineers might fantasize about building an ever more efficient assembly line. And advertising copywriters dream of coining a catchy slogan. People such as Pamela Shadzik, a corporate workforce development specialist, yearn to create the perfect training program - teaching the exact skills needed on the job while advancing the capabilities of employees. These days, when Shadzik has that kind of need, "I just call Cheryl," she said. Cheryl is Cheryl Feldman, executive director of the District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund, an educational program jointly funded by the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees and employers such as the Temple University Health System, where Shadzik works as director of leadership and organizational development.
NEWS
January 1, 2014
A person with a criminal record shouldn't automatically be disqualified from being considered for a job. Neither should a low credit score be an impediment to employment. After all, holding a job and being able to make purchases could be crucial to keeping a person out of trouble with the law. Yet many are denied those privileges. Fortunately, that is beginning to change in many places, including New Jersey, where an Assembly committee has released a bill that would ban employers from conducting criminal background checks on job seekers until after they have given the candidate a conditional job offer.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the recession's "official" end in June 2009, about 12 million people remain unemployed, with more than three jobless people for every opening, the U.S. Labor Department reports. So why do employers constantly whine about their inability to find the talent they need from an applicant pool that they say lacks skills, rudimentary educational abilities, and even a willingness to work? Sitting in his office at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli asked himself the same question.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No one would dispute the importance of basic math, science, and technology literacy in today's world. But is the United States experiencing a dangerous shortage of scientific, technological, engineering, and mathematical talent? The answer is complicated. "Despite the clear demand for STEM talent by domestic employers, the U.S. is failing to produce an ample supply of workers to meet the growing needs of both STEM and non-STEM employers," posits a report being released Friday by the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In the heat of the 2010 gubernatorial campaign, Republican candidate Tom Corbett stirred controversy, and fodder for Democrats, by saying many jobless people "are just going to sit there" and not seek work until their unemployment benefits ran out. Now, midway through his first term and positioning himself to run for a second, Gov. Corbett is taking renewed heat for quoting employers as saying they "can't find anybody that ... has...
BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The few U.S. companies that have been hiring lots of people in this part of the world in recent years - like Amazon.com and Wal-Mart , with their busy shipping warehouses - have picked Pennsylvania and its green fields along free interstates, over New Jersey's aging turnpike industrial parks. Is traffic now going the other way? In September, fast-growing Destination Maternity Corp. said it is leaving its Philadelphia office and warehouse for larger quarters in Burlington County.
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