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NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Industrial engineers might fantasize about building an ever more efficient assembly line. And advertising copywriters dream of coining a catchy slogan. People such as Pamela Shadzik, a corporate workforce development specialist, yearn to create the perfect training program - teaching the exact skills needed on the job while advancing the capabilities of employees. These days, when Shadzik has that kind of need, "I just call Cheryl," she said. Cheryl is Cheryl Feldman, executive director of the District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund, an educational program jointly funded by the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees and employers such as the Temple University Health System, where Shadzik works as director of leadership and organizational development.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After losing the right to use the familiar TransitChek name for its commuter-benefits program, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission on Wednesday unveiled a renamed program for Philadelphia-area commuters and employers. The program, which allows workers to deduct pretax dollars from their paychecks to purchase transit fares, will now be called RideECO. "The name is changing, but nothing administratively will change," said Stacy Bartels, manager of marketing and commuter services for DVRPC.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why so slow? Pennsylvania is one of the states where fewer people are working than in 2007. This isn't quite new. Job growth here has been half the national average for the last 75 years, writes senior economist Mark Vitner and his team at Wells Fargo Securities L.L.C. , the investment arm of the Philadelphia area's dominant bank, in its yearly report reviewing the state's economy. Last year, Pennsylvania suffered layoffs at military contractors, steelmakers, drugmakers. Home prices went flat, and Philadelphia developers are building so many apartments, they are risking a glut - unless the city attracts "considerably more jobs and residents," according to Wells Fargo.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the record, summer intern Neal Cook does make the coffee and empty the trash. But more significant, Cook, a Temple University sports-management major, and fellow intern David Twamley, a business major at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, have other responsibilities that might make them the envy of their copy-making, phone-answering compatriots. They are running their own business - at Front Rush L.L.C., a company that develops sports-team recruiting and compliance software in a cool old factory along the canal in Lambertville, N.J. "On our first day, we were building our own desks," Twamley said.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Even as U.S. productivity and working hours have increased, wages have stagnated or declined since 1979. A new overtime rule proposed by the Obama administration would at long last give many working- and middle-class employees a raise. Under the rule, workers making less than $50,440 a year would be eligible for overtime regardless of their job titles - that is, even if they're classified as managers or in other positions not eligible for overtime at higher salaries. The current threshold is a ridiculous $23,600, which is below the poverty line for a family of four.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Help-desk analyst was the job title, paying in the low-$40,000 annual range. The winning candidate for the position at Reed Technology & Information Services Inc. in Horsham did not have a college degree, or even years of experience. Instead, she had completed a 16-week training program, passing a test certifying her in CompTIA A+, a commonly recognized credential in the world of technology. That, plus a five-week internship, which was part of the program, was enough to take her from "disadvantaged youth" to middle-class and employed.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
MAYOR Nutter recently vetoed legislation that would have mandated that employers supply paid sick time, saying it would harm the job environment in Philadelphia. I'm happy to hear such a positive action towards protecting jobs, but sadly it's not a common occurrence in City Hall. For example, some of the most active proponents of sick leave also supported May's charter amendment to create a jobs commission to find ways "to create and preserve private sector jobs for Philadelphians. " So, in May, Council talks about how we need to "create and preserve" jobs in Philadelphia, but in June passes legislation that will have a negative effect on job growth.
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