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NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Industrial engineers might fantasize about building an ever more efficient assembly line. And advertising copywriters dream of coining a catchy slogan. People such as Pamela Shadzik, a corporate workforce development specialist, yearn to create the perfect training program - teaching the exact skills needed on the job while advancing the capabilities of employees. These days, when Shadzik has that kind of need, "I just call Cheryl," she said. Cheryl is Cheryl Feldman, executive director of the District 1199C Training and Upgrading Fund, an educational program jointly funded by the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees and employers such as the Temple University Health System, where Shadzik works as director of leadership and organizational development.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Tammy L. Gavitt
In an economy where many of us can at least tread water, Philadelphia's low-income workers are drowning. About two out of five workers in Philadelphia have no paid sick leave. In response, a City Council committee last week approved a sick-leave ordinance that would require Philadelphia businesses of six or more employees to provide a limited number of earned, paid sick days. A vote before the full Council could come as early as this week. Businesses can easily supply a nominal amount of paid sick days.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com215-854-5994
Business owners, take note: "Ban the Box" goes into effect Friday. Pull up a chair if you just uttered a deeply confused, "Huh? Wha?" "Ban the Box" - also known by its less-catchy official name, the Philadelphia Fair Criminal Screening Standards Ordinance - was signed into law by Mayor Nutter in April. The ordinance prohibits any business in the city that employs more than 10 people from asking job-seekers either on their application or during their first interview if they have any criminal convictions.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
More than 25 employers will be on hand for a job fair on Oct. 25 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the William H. Gray Youth Center, 12th Street and Cecil B. Moore Avenue. Employers include Temple University, Kensington Hospital, the Philadelphia Police Department, SEPTA, UPS, Einstein Healthcare Network, Wells Fargo and LIFT-Philadelphia. "The statistics on unemployed and underemployed residents in Philadelphia continue to be at a record high," said state Rep. W. Curtis Thomas, sponsor of the annual job fair.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the recession's "official" end in June 2009, about 12 million people remain unemployed, with more than three jobless people for every opening, the U.S. Labor Department reports. So why do employers constantly whine about their inability to find the talent they need from an applicant pool that they say lacks skills, rudimentary educational abilities, and even a willingness to work? Sitting in his office at the University of Pennsylvania, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli asked himself the same question.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
AT A JOB FAIR for the disabled, Kenneth Zuber, 27, of Philadelphia, talks with Rose A. Lepera of Rohm & Haas. Zuber was among 75 people interviewed yesterday by 28 employers at the third annual fair, sponsored by the Delaware Valley Project with Industry, at the Hershey Philadelphia Hotel.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2011 | By Gail MarksJarvis, Chicago Tribune
They are the walking wounded - the people who still have jobs but are growing weary after all the cuts and pressures at work as companies continue trying to do more with less. On average, pay is not keeping up with inflation, and benefits are being cut, too. About 77 percent of human-resources professionals who responded to a survey in February said their companies had cut benefits because of continued economic weakness, according to the Society for Human Resource Management. Government figures showed that income increased just 0.3 percent in May, which is actually a pay cut when inflation is figured into the cost of living.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as Philadelphia's unemployment rate remains stubbornly above 10 percent, the city's prime system to help the jobless find work has underperformed comparable systems in the surrounding counties, other areas around the state, and similar cities across the nation. That's because the system has failed to convince area businesses to use its CareerLink and EARN center services as a way to find qualified employees, says a report released Wednesday by Pew Charitable Trusts' Philadelphia Research Initiative.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
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