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BUSINESS
March 22, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Wayne Jacobs, 66, might describe himself as a career criminal gone good, or maybe gone lucky. Once people are convicted, the individual and their families are "committed to poverty," said Jacobs, whose past includes many convictions, including one for involuntary manslaughter, and decades of in-and-out incarceration. His present? Lobbying for big changes to the Philadelphia law governing when and how employers can use criminal records in hiring. The changes went into effect March 14. They make it easier for people with criminal records to get jobs.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
As chairman of the Pennsylvania Governor's Advisory Commission on Asian-American Affairs, Korean-born Michael Choi of Huntingdon Valley was a well-connected lawyer. His Cheltenham practice grabbed headlines for class-action lawsuits about Agent Orange, the "No Gun Ri" massacre of the Korean War, and slave labor in Japan. He was a frequent guest on TV newsmagazines. But to federal prosecutors in Philadelphia, Choi, 58, was the disgraced mastermind of a conspiracy that fraudulently obtained green cards for immigrant clients.
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER, with less than four weeks left in office, returned to City Council yesterday - where he once served - to give a heartfelt farewell speech that lacked any curse words. He lauded Council for some of its accomplishments since he took office in January 2008. Nutter noted the legislative body's approval of $400 million in re-occurring funding for schools, raising the minimum wage for subcontractors, passing a sick-leave bill and helping to reduce crime by approving various measures in support of the Police Department and ex-convicts.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Tens of thousands of times a week, according to one study, employers steal money from low-wage workers in Philadelphia. They fail to compensate them for overtime, pay them less than the minimum wage, undercount their hours, withhold their tips, or don't pay them at all. A Temple University study estimated that there are about 90,000 incidents of wage theft in the city every week, costing victims $51 to $87. That's less money for rent, food, and...
BUSINESS
November 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Business graduates will be most in demand among employers recruiting those with bachelor's degrees from the Class of 2016, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reported Thursday. "We're still hearing employers talk about the need for graduates to replace [baby boomers] who are retiring," said Andrea Koncz, research director at the Bethlehem-based association. That same concern was voiced by 60 area employers and others who gathered at Cabrini College on Tuesday for a Technology Jobs Summit sponsored by the Main Line Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
A Health section story Sunday erred in describing how employers can share health insurance rebate checks with employees. If an insurer fails to spend at least 80 percent on medical costs, the Affordable Care Act requires employers to pass along a rebate to employees, either as checks or as lower premiums.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as Philadelphia's unemployment rate remains stubbornly above 10 percent, the city's prime system to help the jobless find work has underperformed comparable systems in the surrounding counties, other areas around the state, and similar cities across the nation. That's because the system has failed to convince area businesses to use its CareerLink and EARN center services as a way to find qualified employees, says a report released Wednesday by Pew Charitable Trusts' Philadelphia Research Initiative.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the record, summer intern Neal Cook does make the coffee and empty the trash. But more significant, Cook, a Temple University sports-management major, and fellow intern David Twamley, a business major at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, have other responsibilities that might make them the envy of their copy-making, phone-answering compatriots. They are running their own business - at Front Rush L.L.C., a company that develops sports-team recruiting and compliance software in a cool old factory along the canal in Lambertville, N.J. "On our first day, we were building our own desks," Twamley said.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
N EED A JOB? City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson will be holding a job fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday with more than 50 employers at the Myers Recreation Center on Kingsessing Avenue near 58th Street, Southwest Philadelphia. Participating employers include the Philadelphia Fire Department, the state Department of Transportation, the Philadelphia Gas Works, Wal-Mart and more. The fair is sponsored by the African American Chamber of Commerce and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Doctors' role is key Dr. Peter Ubel's commentary about the complexity of health-insurance plans made the important point that caregivers are unprepared to help patients make cost-conscious decisions about their care ("Choices, plans overwhelming for patients," Friday). Yet many employers that adopt consumer-driven coverage pay little attention to the evidence that employees with high-deductible plans tend to cut back on beneficial as well as wasteful care. That jeopardizes patients' health and could undermine employers' savings when poorly managed health results in high-cost care or disability leaves.
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