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Employment Agency

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NEWS
July 20, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adeline Brown Fraley, 93, formerly of Philadelphia, a retired employment agency owner, died July 7 at Driftwood Health Care in Santa Cruz, Calif. Mrs. Fraley grew up in South Philadelphia, where she studied piano at the Settlement Music School. After graduating from Philadelphia High School for Girls in 1934, she was a secretary for the City of Philadelphia. Then for 10 years she commuted to New York City, where she was a secretary to producers of Broadway shows. When she and her husband of eight years, C. Bradford Fraley, divorced in 1955, she sought a job locally to be able to care for their daughter, Natasha.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1993 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
"Domestic employers are discriminated against," says Wendy Sachs, owner of the Philadelphia Nanny Network Inc. employment agency. The law requires all employers to pay federal Social Security taxes, as well as state unemployement compensation and workers compensation taxes for their employees. But, notes Sachs, the law doesn't permit domestic employers to deduct wages and benefits paid to employees from their income taxes as other employers - like corporations or law firms or retail establishments - can do. A corporation pays its employees with pre-tax income.
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | By John Way Jennings and Mike Franolich, FOR THE INQUIRER
The daughter of a Camden clergyman who had been missing since Dec. 12 turned up unharmed yesterday in Glendale, Calif., authorities said. Glendale police said Tanyitia Cole, 21, sought police assistance in finding shelter in the suburban Los Angeles community, apparently wanting to live and work there. "She said that she ran away, willingly," said Police Officer Susan Hodgman. Members of her family were trying last night to make arrangements to meet her in California, said Tanishya Williams, Cole's recently married twin sister.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Strikers at Kaolin Mushroom Farms in Kennett Square said they will expand their picketing today to a temporary employment agency in Wilmington that has been supplying the company with replacement workers. Ventura Gutierrez, a California labor organizer who is leading the work stoppage, also said strikers would visit other mushroom companies in the area today to tell people about the strike and discourage them from accepting jobs at Kaolin. As the strike entered its fourth day, Arthur Read, a lawyer with Friends of Farmworkers, a group providing legal aid to the strikers, yesterday sought a federal court order prohibiting Kaolin from using workers from the employment agency.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2011 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - You've decided to hire your first employee. But where do you go to find the best candidate? Online job sites. If you're comfortable working online, you'll probably find it easy to post your job opening on local or nationwide sites. You'll need to create an account and pay a fee. Fees can vary dramatically from one site to another - for example, $25 to $100. The hard part is going through potentially hundreds of resumés and trying to decide which candidates to pursue.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
Retirement for many people does not necessarily mean an end to their working days and a beginning to their days of sitting around the house watching soap operas and talk shows. Many retirees, according to a local retirement group, prefer to make use of their valuable time and continue to be productive in society by offering their services to volunteer organizations. By matching such retirees with local community organizations that need help, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marian Joyce Hayden Coulbourn, 71, a retired personnel and advertising executive who had sung with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra, died last Thursday at her Plymouth Meeting home after a long illness. Mrs. Coulbourn, who was born and educated in Birmingham, Ala., sang with the U.S. Army Band during World War II. "She was a torch singer and appeared as a soloist with the Paul Whiteman band later in the 1940s, mostly in the Florida area," said her daughter, Dale C. Fetterolf. Mrs. Coulbourn resided in Wilmington from 1951 to 1986, when she moved to Plymouth Meeting.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Ward Allebach, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery Township supervisors once jokingly referred to Thomas O. Witthauer's restoration of the Lower State Road farmhouse as "the waiver property. " The township Zoning Hearing Board Tuesday night ruled that Witthauer - who has been before the board at least nine times - deserved some more help. Voting 3-0, the board decided to amend a ruling from last spring. The change would allow Witthauer to sublet five rooms of the 22-room, three-story building as one-person offices for a three-year period.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
Charlotte Walton Tapley, 94, an energetic saleswoman, died of pneumonia Wednesday, July 21, at the Waverly Heights retirement community in Gladwyne. Mrs. Tapley graduated from Olney High School. While a student at Beaver College, now Arcadia University, she met Harry V. Tapley, a salesman. They eloped in 1937. He was Irish Catholic and she was Protestant, and their parents had disapproved of their relationship. In the late 1940s, Mrs. Tapley and her husband moved to Oak Lane and she went to work to help pay their children's private school tuitions.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Transportation officials are hoping a new minibus route will prove a major step forward for public transportation in Chester County. But some employment authorities say it is questionable whether limited service can have much of an impact on employment rolls. SEPTA began operating Route 314 between the Goshen Corporate Park in West Goshen and the Larkin's Corner shopping center in Chichester on Mar. 2. Running every 30 minutes, but only during rush hours, the route passes several large employers, including QVC, Mars Electronics, and the State Farm Insurance Co., using 20-passenger buses.
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NEWS
April 22, 2013
Now that immigration reform legislation has been introduced, its foes are trying to further jeopardize its already slim chances of passage by describing it as a gift to the estimated 11 million people who are in the country illegally. That's an insult to the so-called Gang of Eight senators, four Republicans and four Democrats, who spent weeks devising a compromise plan that wouldn't totally please either side. In fact, reform advocates have been given too little credit for how much they are giving up to move the ball forward.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2011 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - You've decided to hire your first employee. But where do you go to find the best candidate? Online job sites. If you're comfortable working online, you'll probably find it easy to post your job opening on local or nationwide sites. You'll need to create an account and pay a fee. Fees can vary dramatically from one site to another - for example, $25 to $100. The hard part is going through potentially hundreds of resumés and trying to decide which candidates to pursue.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
Charlotte Walton Tapley, 94, an energetic saleswoman, died of pneumonia Wednesday, July 21, at the Waverly Heights retirement community in Gladwyne. Mrs. Tapley graduated from Olney High School. While a student at Beaver College, now Arcadia University, she met Harry V. Tapley, a salesman. They eloped in 1937. He was Irish Catholic and she was Protestant, and their parents had disapproved of their relationship. In the late 1940s, Mrs. Tapley and her husband moved to Oak Lane and she went to work to help pay their children's private school tuitions.
NEWS
July 20, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adeline Brown Fraley, 93, formerly of Philadelphia, a retired employment agency owner, died July 7 at Driftwood Health Care in Santa Cruz, Calif. Mrs. Fraley grew up in South Philadelphia, where she studied piano at the Settlement Music School. After graduating from Philadelphia High School for Girls in 1934, she was a secretary for the City of Philadelphia. Then for 10 years she commuted to New York City, where she was a secretary to producers of Broadway shows. When she and her husband of eight years, C. Bradford Fraley, divorced in 1955, she sought a job locally to be able to care for their daughter, Natasha.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | By Ewart Rouse, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden deli owner Jee Soo Choi did not believe he was hearing right when he was told by the Camden Empowerment Zone Corp. that he was eligible to receive $1,000 in "free money" from the agency. He qualified to receive a windfall of sorts, the agency informed him last month, because his business was within the empowerment zone, had gross revenues of less than $3 million a year, and one of his two employees had been on the payroll for more than 20 weeks. "I didn't believe it," said the owner of Camden Seafood & Deli on Market Street.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dominick Calamia, 14, read some of the barbs. Caught others carping on TV. Basically, he was ready for high-tech dreck. "A work of almost unrelieved awfulness. " - Anthony Lane, the New Yorker. "A disappointment. A big one. " - David Ansen, Newsweek. The teenager's review after yesterday's 8 a.m. showing of Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace at Plymouth Meeting Mall? "Awesome. " Loved the costumes. Dug the digital creatures. Found the fighting to be a pleasant surprise.
NEWS
November 23, 1998 | By Tom Dorricott
'That '70s Show" is a television sitcom whose appeal stems from its portrayal of the fads, clothes and ideas, as well as the naivete and idealism, that dominated life two decades ago. It reminds us that we now live in a world of completely different realities and expectations. No major corporation or government entity could survive today using strategies that went out of style with bell bottoms and Nehru jackets. Businesses changed the way they operated, or they folded.
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Transportation officials are hoping a new minibus route will prove a major step forward for public transportation in Chester County. But some employment authorities say it is questionable whether limited service can have much of an impact on employment rolls. SEPTA began operating Route 314 between the Goshen Corporate Park in West Goshen and the Larkin's Corner shopping center in Chichester on Mar. 2. Running every 30 minutes, but only during rush hours, the route passes several large employers, including QVC, Mars Electronics, and the State Farm Insurance Co., using 20-passenger buses.
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert Lee "Sonny" Hamilton, a Parking Authority administrator from West Philadelphia, died March 14 of kidney failure. He was 60. Active and dedicated to community work, Hamilton spent many years working with drug and alcohol abuse programs. He was known for his engaging personality and his stylish Boyd's-only wardrobe. "We used to call him 'Mr. Top of the Line,' " said his daughter Robin Renee Hamilton. Born and raised in Chester, Hamilton graduated from Chester High School and what is now the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore campus.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Marian Joyce Hayden Coulbourn, 71, a retired personnel and advertising executive who had sung with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra, died last Thursday at her Plymouth Meeting home after a long illness. Mrs. Coulbourn, who was born and educated in Birmingham, Ala., sang with the U.S. Army Band during World War II. "She was a torch singer and appeared as a soloist with the Paul Whiteman band later in the 1940s, mostly in the Florida area," said her daughter, Dale C. Fetterolf. Mrs. Coulbourn resided in Wilmington from 1951 to 1986, when she moved to Plymouth Meeting.
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