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Empty Nest

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NEWS
September 2, 2002
Moving your youngest child to a college dorm this fall? Tell us your expectations, concerns and feelings about becoming an "empty nester. " How do you expect to spend your time differently? What do you expect from this new phase in your family's life? Send essays of 200 to 300 words to Voices/Empty Nest, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 or e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com. Look for the responses on the Community Voices page when it moves to Sunday Neighbors starting in October.
REAL_ESTATE
February 4, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Most parents don't think of being a twosome again until the house is devoid of offspring. Not Suzanne and Chuck Cruit of Media. Maybe it was because the Cruit nest had no one zip code for long. During the couple's 28 years of marriage, they have lived in Washington, D.C.; Huntington Beach, Calif.; Newtown Square, Delaware County; and East Goshen, Chester County. With life's changes so clearly and chronologically documented, the Cruits didn't need a crystal ball to get an accurate picture of the future.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR THE PAST three months, I'd tell anyone who would listen that I was in "glief. " I made up the word to describe the simultaneous state of glee and grief I was experiencing as I prepared for my kid to leave home for college. Glee that I'd get back the time that had become Addie's when she wailed into the world 18 years ago. And grief that this fulfilling phase of motherhood would soon be over. "I am glief-stricken!" I'd say, insufferably pleased with myself for being in touch with my emotions.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Ellen Goodman
It is a late summer day when we migrate south. The two of us, mother and daughter, join that long caravan of families in borrowed station wagons and rented vans, moving the contents of a million bedrooms to a million dorm rooms. The cars in our 60-mile-an-hour lane are packed to the hilt with student "basics. " Stereos and stuffed animals pop up into my rear-view mirror in Connecticut. Guitars and quilts are strapped onto rooftop boxes in New York. When we take a fast-food break on the New Jersey Turnpike, the wagon trains going south mix with those traveling north.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I've been nesting like crazy lately, which is funny, considering that I have no eggs left. I can't explain this, but I'm betting that I'm not the only Mama Bird who looked around her empty nest and realized that it needed curtains. At first, I dismissed the idea. I thought it made no sense, timing-wise. I've had no curtains, on any of the windows, for the last 20 years. Why fix up the house now that it was empty? The horse had not only left the barn, she had moved to New York.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Roger and Mimi Brown's two sons grew up and moved away, the couple was left trying to care for a large house and two acres of land. Instead of trying to maintain the property, the Browns decided to move. "The prospects of cutting two acres of grass was too much," Roger Brown said. In February, the Browns sold their Solebury house, packed up their belongings and moved to an apartment at Breyer Estates in Elkins Park. The Browns are examples of what are known as empty-nesters - couples in their 40s and 50s who no longer have children living at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012
DEAR ABBY : I have to respond to your reply to "Tammi's Mom in N.J.," whose daughter won't answer her texts at college. Our daughter, "Jill," attended college 12 hours from home. She would text me almost every day - short, sweet messages always ending with "Luv U, XOXO. " I looked forward to those texts because they were a lifeline to my daughter. Tammi's Mom is coping with empty nest syndrome, which no child can understand until she experiences it. Thankfully, Jill knew how much her texts meant to me. They got me through four long years without her. I hope Tammi sees this and appreciates that she has a mom who cares about her. - Remembering in Johnstown, Pa. DEAR REMEMBERING : Thank you for sharing.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | Los Angeles Daily News
Despite the just-concluded writers' strike, NBC will hit the ground running after the Olympics with 23 new and returning series starting within a month of the games. NBC will have its first new show on the air before its Olympics coverage begins Sept. 15. "Sneak previews" of "Baby Boom," "Dear John" or "Empty Nest" will run before Sept. 10. Thirteen new and returning series will premiere the week after Olympics coverage ends Oct. 3. The other 10 will join the lineup after NBC's telecasts of the World Series, set for the weeks of Oct. 10 and 17. WEEK OF OCT. 3: "ALF," "The Hogan Family," (Mon.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
LIFE AFTER CHILDREN Even before your children are ready to leave home, take steps to avoid the trauma of empty-nest syndrome. "Make sure social, recreational and occupational opportunities are available to compensate for your empty nest," says Mayo Clinic psychiatrist Jeffrey D. Rome. "Don't wait until the children leave home to develop outside interests. As infants grow to be teenagers, parenting responsibilities change and can afford you the opportunity to do some of those things you put on hold when the kids were in diapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
CBS won the weekly ratings race for the first time in almost two years, thanks to strong performances from regular series and "Shattered Dreams," a Sunday-night movie starring Lindsay Wagner as a battered wife. NBC, usually the weekly leader, finished a close second, with ABC third for the seven days ending May 13. Behind the usual front-runners "Funniest Home Videos" - Parts One and Two - "Roseanne," "Cheers," "Empty Nest" and "Cosby," "Shattered Dreams" placed seventh, with 28 percent of the viewers tuned in. In the same Sunday-night time slot, ABC's television debut of the acclaimed film "Platoon" received a 22 percent share, and the first part of a heavily hyped miniseries, "People Like Us," received a 16 percent share for NBC, finishing in 60th place for the week.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR THE PAST three months, I'd tell anyone who would listen that I was in "glief. " I made up the word to describe the simultaneous state of glee and grief I was experiencing as I prepared for my kid to leave home for college. Glee that I'd get back the time that had become Addie's when she wailed into the world 18 years ago. And grief that this fulfilling phase of motherhood would soon be over. "I am glief-stricken!" I'd say, insufferably pleased with myself for being in touch with my emotions.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
BREAST-CANCER romcom - there's a phrase you don't hear every day. Or a movie you might never expect to see, although Danish director Susanne Bier makes a brave attempt in "Love is All You Need. " It's the bilingual (mostly English) story of a Danish hairdresser Ida (Trine Dyrholm) whose empty nest may soon be empty of her husband - he has a wandering eye and lately has been making eyes at his trashy bookkeeper. The least of her problems. She's just finished chemotherapy, and although her physicians say she is cancer-free, they are clumsily candid about her chances to remain so. (Bier has a knack for social awkwardness that flourishes during these scenes.)
REAL_ESTATE
February 4, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Most parents don't think of being a twosome again until the house is devoid of offspring. Not Suzanne and Chuck Cruit of Media. Maybe it was because the Cruit nest had no one zip code for long. During the couple's 28 years of marriage, they have lived in Washington, D.C.; Huntington Beach, Calif.; Newtown Square, Delaware County; and East Goshen, Chester County. With life's changes so clearly and chronologically documented, the Cruits didn't need a crystal ball to get an accurate picture of the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2012
DEAR ABBY : I have to respond to your reply to "Tammi's Mom in N.J.," whose daughter won't answer her texts at college. Our daughter, "Jill," attended college 12 hours from home. She would text me almost every day - short, sweet messages always ending with "Luv U, XOXO. " I looked forward to those texts because they were a lifeline to my daughter. Tammi's Mom is coping with empty nest syndrome, which no child can understand until she experiences it. Thankfully, Jill knew how much her texts meant to me. They got me through four long years without her. I hope Tammi sees this and appreciates that she has a mom who cares about her. - Remembering in Johnstown, Pa. DEAR REMEMBERING : Thank you for sharing.
REAL_ESTATE
February 5, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The chili pot will be on in the Moorestown home of Fred and Rosemary Abbate. The kitchen will be transformed into food central. Downstairs, this 1912 dwelling, on a former peacock farm on a quiet corner near the center of town, will fill with Super Bowl watchers by late afternoon - as it has for nearly three decades. Some houses are just made for parties, and this is one of them. Its owners, now empty-nesters, reared three lively sons here, so it's a kick-back, comfortable place with the sturdy "bones" of an earlier era. Actually, it was because of one of those boys that the couple made a move from one end of Moorestown's Third Street to another.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I've been nesting like crazy lately, which is funny, considering that I have no eggs left. I can't explain this, but I'm betting that I'm not the only Mama Bird who looked around her empty nest and realized that it needed curtains. At first, I dismissed the idea. I thought it made no sense, timing-wise. I've had no curtains, on any of the windows, for the last 20 years. Why fix up the house now that it was empty? The horse had not only left the barn, she had moved to New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Everyone, it seems, loves to watch A.R. Gurney's Sylvia , and everyone loves to produce it. Since 1995, the comedy about a boy and his dog, and his wife, and his midlife crisis as projected onto the dog, played by a cute young woman (Jessica Bedford) with shaggy blond curls, is a perennial on regional stages. This time, the lassie comes home to Ambler's Act II Playhouse, and why not? People love dogs, people love marriages weathering crisis, people love a happy ending. I do not love Sylvia , though I do anthropomorphize and love dogs, and all the rest of it. Lines such as Sylvia's wide-eyed declaration, "Even when you hit me, I love you" always struck me as a lose-lose proposition.
TRAVEL
September 11, 2011 | By Dave Johnson, For The Inquirer
This personal journey begins at the end. After 50 hours in New York City to get out of the neighborhood and take in a couple of plays, my wife and I returned home, where we had left our 19-year-old son Cale to his own devices. His older sister thought us crazy. And so began our second journey, an investigation, sniffing for clues about what happened during our absence. Clue No. 1: A strange car sits in the driveway. Clue No. 2: We get blasted by an overwhelming odor as we open the front door.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Once I was the mom who was cranky with the school-supply scene, the search-and-destroy missions for folders, notebooks, lunch boxes, and backpacks. Now, I get misty when I see the stampede at the malls and the discount stores. Sometimes, I have to turn away as the feelings of loss - yes, loss - engulf me. I miss the clarion call to action that I used to heed every late August with my three girls, now grown. Back then, we'd drift into back-to-school mode, half-dreamily at first, then full-throttle.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
With her son and only child starting college, Jane Eyre was looking - as so many do - for ways to enliven her evenings and fill the empty nest. In a community night-school catalog, two courses caught her interest: tai chi and fencing. An artist and athlete, Eyre was seeking to engage both mind and body. In her mid-40s, she also was itching for a way to express a newfound sense of self-confidence. Eyre signed up for fencing and within just a few sessions knew she had found her passion.
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