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NEWS
April 24, 2001 | by Kitty Caparella Daily News Staff Writer
Wrestling with a multiply wounded, blood-soaked victim of a mob hit still plays like a "silent movie" in the mind's eye of Fire Lt. Colleen Mitchell. Mob underboss Joseph Ciancaglini was the most seriously injured and bloodiest victim she had encountered in less than a year on the job as an emergency medical technician and firefighter assigned to Engine 60 at 31st Street and Grays Ferry Avenue. "It was the most blood I ever had on me," a visibly upset Mitchell told Special Deputy U.S. Attorney Steven D'Aguanno.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | By Noel E. Holton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dan Conley doesn't consider himself a hero. In fact, he claims to be somewhat confused about all of the attention that he has received since he helped to save his 13-year-old neighbor's life last month. "I just did what was second nature to me," Conley, 29, a former volunteer emergency medical technician, said yesterday. "I enjoy the work I've done with EMT and I'm glad I was in the right place to help Bobby. " Conley recalls that he was on his way to visit the family of neighbor Robert "Bobby" Miller on a Saturday afternoon when he stopped to talk to another resident across the street from the Miller home.
NEWS
January 24, 2009 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gasping for air on the 911 recording, the 45-year-old Chester County woman said she was having difficulty breathing. Early on Feb. 22, 2004, Judy Pomerleau of Lower Oxford Township told a 911 operator that she had a history of heart and asthma problems but would try to unlock her door. "Oh, Lord," she is heard repeating. Pomerleau never made it to the door, and yesterday a Chester County Court civil jury concluded that Southern Chester County Emergency Medical Services was negligent for failing to break into the home.
NEWS
November 12, 1997 | By Steve Ritea, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It is perhaps the toughest call an ambulance crew has to answer. The kind that requires flashing lights, but no sirens. Uniforms, but no equipment. Urgency, but no rush. To honor the passing of one of their own, nearly 40 ambulance crews from New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania and elsewhere parked their rescue vans here yesterday and filed silently into St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church. Herbert W. McCay, 31, an emergency medical technician for American Medical Response, died Thursday morning when the ambulance he was riding in hit a car and then a utility pole at 66th and 12th Streets in Philadelphia's East Oak Lane neighborhood.
NEWS
November 17, 1991 | By Stephanie Banchero, Special to The Inquirer
In a medical emergency, a few seconds can make the difference between life and death. Unfortunately for Upper Dublin residents, the response time by local ambulance companies can be delayed because there are no ambulance services based in the township. Half the township is served by the Ambler Ambulance Association, based in Ambler Borough, and the other half is served by the Second Alarmers Rescue Squad, stationed in Willow Grove, Upper Moreland Township. To make things worse, during daytime hours the volunteer ambulance services often find it hard to assemble a full crew.
SPORTS
April 27, 2000 | By Ira Josephs, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Lacrosse satisfies some of Monte Caplan's need for speed. But not quite. The Harriton captain is a top-flight goalie who has received a nomination to attend the Air Force Academy, where he plans to play lacrosse. He is a licensed pilot, an emergency medical technician (EMT) with Narberth Ambulance, and a volunteer firefighter with the Gladwyne Fire Company. Furthermore, Caplan gets As and Bs in his classes and plays football for Harriton. His artistic side is satisfied by playing guitar with a rock/funk/jazz band, Pea Soup.
SPORTS
March 16, 2006 | By Mike Jensen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The company that runs the Liacouras Center said it was "an oversight" that an emergency medical unit was not at the building Tuesday for the NIT basketball game between Temple and Akron. "We did not have one [Tuesday night]," said Tim Murphy, spokesman for Global Spectrum. "Going forward, we will continue with our policy to have one at every game. " It became an issue when the Owls' Mardy Collins crashed to the floor late in the last minute of the overtime period and an Akron player landed on his neck.
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | By Gwendolyn Crump, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the family of a 2-year-old boy called 911 because the toddler had fallen down a flight of stairs, Officer Cheryl Randall, a Burlington City Police Department emergency medical technician, was there within two minutes. Once inside, Randall asked the wailing child where he was hurting. He indicated a "boo boo" near his head and neck. Randall examined him, calmed the family down, and prepared a child-size stretcher. An ambulance arrived moments later and took the little boy to the hospital.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE PHILADELPHIA Civil Service Commission today will hear a pitch on how the Nutter administration plans to make staffing changes to ambulance runs - but not without resistance from the union that represents the city's firefighters and paramedics. Nutter is seeking approval from the Civil Service Commission to allow the Fire Department to implement a new deployment plan for 9-1-1 calls - one that replaces the two paramedics who are dispatched with one paramedic and one EMT. Paramedics receive more in-depth training than their EMT counterparts.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Mount Holly law enforcement units soon may be equipped to administer life support to fire and accident victims. Under a newly inaugurated plan, about half a dozen of the township's 23 police officers will receive emergency medical technician training. Now, only one township officer, Patrolman Douglas Barrow, is a certified EMT. The department hopes to train other officers so that at least one certified EMT will be on duty at all times. "Although it will cost the township money to train the officers, a price cannot be put on the saving of a life," said Joseph Indiero, Mount Holly's director of public safety.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writers
If all goes as ordained by New Jersey lawmakers, six months from now Camden will be served by a fleet of brand-new ambulances and emergency vehicles staffed by paramedics and medical technicians working for Cooper University Hospital. Cooper, a teaching hospital and a designated Level 1 trauma center, was authorized to take over these services in legislation signed by Gov. Christie last week. Will Camden residents needing emergency care be better off? They will be, Cooper officials promise and some EMTs cautiously hope.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there One night after work in October 2011, Jason, his buddy Chip, and another friend figured they'd grab a beer at Mike's York Street Bar & Grill in Warminster - Jason's hometown. They were enjoying their beers when two women approached their bar stools. Maggie, a student at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, had been given an assignment by her introduction-to-communications professor: Invade a stranger's personal space. Write down what happens. Maggie and her friend Stefanie, who came with her for moral support, were looking for that stranger when Stefanie spotted her friend Chip.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE PHILADELPHIA Civil Service Commission today will hear a pitch on how the Nutter administration plans to make staffing changes to ambulance runs - but not without resistance from the union that represents the city's firefighters and paramedics. Nutter is seeking approval from the Civil Service Commission to allow the Fire Department to implement a new deployment plan for 9-1-1 calls - one that replaces the two paramedics who are dispatched with one paramedic and one EMT. Paramedics receive more in-depth training than their EMT counterparts.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
LOS ANGELES - Fire Capt. Art Hurtado was making an off-duty visit to a Home Depot store Wednesday when he encountered a horrific sight - a man had deliberately cut his own arms to the bone with handsaws. As others screamed, the veteran paramedic used materials from store shelves to stanch the bleeding. "I kind of MacGyver-ed it," Hurtado said Thursday, referring to the old TV drama about a secret agent who used whatever materials he could find to solve problems. The victim of the self-mutilation remained hospitalized in critical condition as investigators tried to determine why he hurt himself.
NEWS
August 15, 2011 | BY CHRISTOPHER DEAN
IT'S MY favorite thing - biking from the suburbs into the city. I call it my Cradle of Liberty Ride, and I'm convinced I can sell anyone on the merits of Philadelphia with just one ride. I travel through the Wissahickon along Forbidden Drive, onto Kelly Drive paralleling the Schuylkill, past Boathouse Row, the Art Museum, then onto Old City, most all of it on bike paths. It is arguably the most beautiful inner-city ride in the nation. And, on the last Sunday of July, it seemed no different, at least at first.
NEWS
December 30, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
A couple of unholy, intoxicated churchgoers - high on booze and drugs - crashed a Midnight Mass in Drexel Hill on Christmas Eve when they stumbled down the aisle, fondled each other in a pew and flushed drugs down the church toilet, police said. Authorities believe that Alexander Pirone, 21, and Catherine McGrath, 24, planned to hide in the restroom until after the building was locked up for the night so that they could burglarize the church, but a cop and an EMT at the Mass thwarted them, said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
The picture painted yesterday of Joseph Vignola Jr. - son of former City Councilman and Controller Joseph Vignola - was that of a young man from a privileged background who was loved by his parents, but who developed anger, anxiety and acceptance issues in his teen years. After failing out of St. Joseph's Prep and transferring to the Valley Forge Military Academy, Vignola did well and was promoted to a supervisory post. But as he reported on what other students had done, he in turn was beat on by his classmates, according to details at his sentencing hearing yesterday.
NEWS
August 19, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Birthdays tend to be joyful occasions, but for Malika Scott, July 12 will forever be a painful reminder of the day her brother was shot to death. "We were best friends. That was my favorite brother," said Malika, who turned 19 that day. "He had planned to have a party for my birthday. " Markiese Scott, 23, was killed when someone fired multiple shots into his vehicle after he left a bowling alley at 72nd Street and Elmwood Avenue in Southwest Philly. Scott was hit in the head at 11:20 p.m., and a 20-year-old woman with him suffered a graze wound to the back.
NEWS
January 19, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anxious to heal the injured in Haiti, Jessica Mitchell, an emergency-room doctor at Cooper University Hospital, was closer to her mission but still frustrated. Tamping down her impatience with a mechanical chore, Mitchell again counted the group's supplies: 70 pounds of assorted medicines. Two duffel bags filled with plaster gauze for making orthopedic casts. Boxes of metal "external fixators" used to stabilize major bone breaks. Mitchell spent two hours sifting, sorting, counting - and agonizing.
NEWS
July 8, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry McDonald stands in a crowded hotel suite, plastic cup of sambuca held high, listening to his son's friends offer toasts. "He was loyal," says one. "That's what he was. " "For PAT!" says another. "For PAT!" comes the chorus. Police, firefighters, and relatives down their drinks. If they're spare with words, their sentiment is eloquent. They have all come to Washington during National Police Week in May to attend memorial services for police killed in the line of duty.
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