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Encephalitis

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NEWS
December 28, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Florida Department of Health has lifted its 27-county medical alert for St. Louis encephalitis, a mosquito-born disease that was reported in a handful of people and detected in "sentinel chickens" in south-central parts of the state, including key tourist areas. The alert was ended because there had been no new human cases since late October and monitoring showed a decline in mosquitoes bearing the virus. Officials had predicted that would happen with the cooler, drier weather of late fall and early winter.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In New York City, where three people have died of mosquito-borne encephalitis, health workers continued to spray pesticide yesterday to stem a possible epidemic, while plans were made upstate for burial today of a 3-year-old girl who died in an E. coli outbreak that may have infected nearly 500 people. State health officials in Albany said there have been 497 unconfirmed cases of the E. coli infection, which causes abdominal cramps and severe bloody diarrhea, and in the worst cases can lead to kidney failure and death.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Amid scenes of diving helicopters, New York City is locked in a sudden air war against a deadly mosquito. The city is bombing its five anxious boroughs with bug spray. And as New York's tally of cases of St. Louis encephalitis grows, officials in Philadelphia and New Jersey are working to prevent the whole astounding crisis from moving close to home. "There's no way a wind current is going to carry them here from New York City," said Philly's environmental health director, Randall Hirschhorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Tests have been completed on eight New Jerseyans with fevers and other symptoms associated with encephalitis, and none has the virus that is blamed for at least six deaths in New York, state health officials said yesterday. That does not mean the people tested aren't, or weren't, stricken with encephalitis, which has many possible causes, or an unrelated condition. But in terms of an airborne viral epidemic transmitted by mosquitoes, there is no indication yet that New Jersey has cause for worry, said Dennis McGowan, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Senior Services.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
Delaware County environmental officials said mosquito spraying is scheduled for Tuesday evening to fight the West Nile virus. If it rains, the spraying will be moved to Wednesday. Spraying will be done in open spaces of residential and recreational areas in parts of Aldan, Clifton Heights, Collingdale and Darby Boroughs, officials said. Adult mosquitos in those areas have tested positive for the West Nile virus, which can cause humans to contract West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
ENCEPHALITIS New Jersey residents, beware: Two potentially deadly types of viral encephalitis have reached unusually high levels among virus-carrying mosquitoes in New Jersey and at least four other states, federal health officials warn. The Centers for Disease Control reports high levels of transmission of encephalitis viruses in New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Florida and Texas, "indicating a potential risk for epidemic transmission. " LIVING WILLS Doctors should encourage you to write down whether you want life-sustaining treatment stopped if you become hopelessly ill and can't speak for yourself.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge delayed the resumption of the racketeering trial of reputed mob leader Gaetano Vastola until Feb. 13 yesterday after consulting with a doctor who is treating Vastola for encephalitis at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital in New York. After a telephone conference call with the doctor, Judge Stanley Brotman denied a motion by Vastola's attorney for a mistrial and instead continued the month-long recess in the case. "Mr. Vastola appears to be on the mend," Brotman said in court after he and the attorneys in the case completed the conference telephone call from his chambers.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the wake of an outbreak of St. Louis encephalitis that has killed three people in New York City, Philadelphia officials are stepping up efforts to control mosquitoes, which can carry the disease. Each year, the city treats standing water to kill mosquito larvae during the summer. This year, it is doing a second round of treatments in the city's thousands of sewer inlets and catch basins "just to be on the safe side," said Randall Hirschhorn, director of environmental health services for the Philadelphia health department.
NEWS
October 10, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Florida health officials are maintaining a vigil for new cases of St. Louis encephalitis, while state residents and tourists are altering their lifestyles to hide from mosquitoes that spread the potentially deadly disease. The state Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services has confirmed at least 28 cases of St. Louis encephalitis and listed 10 more likely cases involving the often disabling disease - all in central and south Florida. "Where it goes from here is anybody's guess," department spokesman Ernie Durfee said in Tallahassee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
In hindsight, Susan Wendel thinks her daughter was sick months before she wound up in a coma. Charlotte's second-grade teacher that fall complained that she was disruptive. That was a big change from first grade, but her mother wrote it off as growing pains. Other behavior was a little odd, too. "She did things like wear her sweater backwards and pull her pockets inside out," Wendel said. Still, Charlotte was 7. Eccentricity isn't unusual at that age. But, as 2009 ended, Charlotte crashed.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
Delaware County environmental officials said mosquito spraying is scheduled for Tuesday evening to fight the West Nile virus. If it rains, the spraying will be moved to Wednesday. Spraying will be done in open spaces of residential and recreational areas in parts of Aldan, Clifton Heights, Collingdale and Darby Boroughs, officials said. Adult mosquitos in those areas have tested positive for the West Nile virus, which can cause humans to contract West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain.
NEWS
September 25, 2005 | By Mike McPhate FOR THE INQUIRER
About 60 children infected with encephalitis lie writhing and moaning on metal cots in pediatric Ward 6. Their eyes stare and roll back. Their chests jerk as they struggle for air. A quarter will die, doctors say. Among these damp lowlands spanning northern India and southern Nepal, an outbreak of the viral disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) has stretched for 11 weeks and taken more than 1,100 lives, the great majority children, officials say. The unfolding tragedy, expected to last until the monsoon heat wears off in November, could easily have been prevented, say several health experts.
NEWS
October 22, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A 2-year-old girl from Burlington County has contracted the state's first case of mosquito-borne eastern equine encephalitis in nearly 20 years, state health officials announced yesterday. The rare but often deadly disease, which causes swelling of the brain, has no treatment. Health officials say the child's plight highlights the dangers of the mosquito explosion created by an unusually wet summer and early fall. The child was hospitalized Aug. 23 after developing a high fever, seizures and vomiting.
NEWS
August 20, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first case since 2000 of eastern equine encephalitis in a horse in New Jersey has been found in a thoroughbred in Mays Landing. The diagnosis comes as the region contends with an explosion in the mosquito population from a wetter than usual summer. The 8-year-old horse became ill Aug. 6 and declined quickly, and was euthanized the next day, the state Department of Agriculture said. Blood tests later confirmed the horse had the mosquito-borne disease, which can also affect humans.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "The press is confused because we are confused. " - Lara Flynn Boyle, in the New York Post, on coverage of her on-again, off-again relationship with Jack Nicholson Resilient star Liza Minnelli has battled health problems before - drug dependence, alcohol dependence, weight gain, bum hips, you name it. But the singer and actress has never faced any illness quite as scary as viral encephalitis, which she's fighting this week...
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Tests have been completed on eight New Jerseyans with fevers and other symptoms associated with encephalitis, and none has the virus that is blamed for at least six deaths in New York, state health officials said yesterday. That does not mean the people tested aren't, or weren't, stricken with encephalitis, which has many possible causes, or an unrelated condition. But in terms of an airborne viral epidemic transmitted by mosquitoes, there is no indication yet that New Jersey has cause for worry, said Dennis McGowan, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Senior Services.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Twelve human blood samples have been sent from New Jersey to federal laboratories to be tested for a mosquito-borne encephalitis virus that has killed five people in the New York area, officials said yesterday. Viral encephalitis rarely strikes anyone but the elderly and the very young, and even then is not generally fatal. But one of the 12 samples was taken from a 30-year-old Monmouth County man who was in critical condition yesterday afternoon at Jersey Shore Medical Center in Neptune.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Four dead crows from northern New Jersey tested positive for a mosquito-borne virus blamed for the recent deaths of at least four New Yorkers, New Jersey officials said yesterday. No New Jersey residents have been found to have the virus, which can cause encephalitis in the elderly or the very young. State officials are continuing to urge that county officials spray for mosquitoes. The crows came from Bergen, Essex, Middlesex and Union Counties. A fifth dead crow, from Mercer County, did not have the virus, according to a news release from the state Department of Health and Senior Services.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Birds are dying by the hundreds, dozens of people have been running fevers, and four elderly people have died - all officially attributed to an unusual form of mosquito-borne encephalitis. Yet for any New Yorkers worth their weight in corned beef, the reaction appears to be one of studied unconcern. "I'm not panicking or scared or anything like that," said Paula Gural, a resident of Manhattan's tony Upper West Side, who took her two grandchildren, ages 2 and 4, to a Central Park playground at 8 a.m. yesterday.
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