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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
One of the most conspicuous absentees from last spring's Oscar nominations was Steven Soderbergh's The Limey. Propelled by a brilliant performance from Terence Stamp as a driven criminal, the film was itself criminally underrated. A second chance to catch this finely crafted film noir is fitting for a work that allows two actors to prove that - F. Scott Fitzgerald's maxim notwithstanding - there is room for a second act in our lives. Stamp stars as Wilson, an embittered British ex-con who has come to Los Angeles to learn how his estranged daughter died.
NEWS
December 31, 1989
We have to confess to occasionally giving in to the defeatist notion that Camden is a lost cause. Its poverty, its decay, its problems tend to dominate the headlines and, thus, perceptions. But every now and then, a bolt of energy and enthusiasm flies out of its bleakest reaches, shattering the stereotype, confounding the image. Sometimes a basketball team will do it. Sometimes a class working on a spacecraft experiment. This year it's Camden High School's Marching Panthers - band and ensemble.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Television Writer
He may be the people's choice, but "Encore! Encore!" star Nathan Lane figures he's no longer NBC's. "I'm like NBC's Jewish mother. They don't call, they don't write," Lane moaned to reporters Sunday night, moments after being named the favorite male performer in a new television series during CBS's live broadcast of the 25th Annual People's Choice Awards. "There was so much negativity around this show . . . for about 10 minutes, everyone thought it was a good idea, and then it all went downhill," he said.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
An encore, most often, is something light, a piece of daring or relative fluff meant to send an audience whistling on its way. But Yuri Temirkanov has other ideas. Leading the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra in the season opener of the Kimmel Center's visiting-orchestra series, Temirkanov chose as the final encore a fight scene that ends with horrific music as the loser's body is being carried away. On paper, it might seem a bizarre choice. Yet not only did the sliver of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet act as a wonderfully emotional postscript to Sunday afternoon's concert, but it also gave the orchestra exactly the piece it seemed born to play.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Samuel Barber's warmblooded Violin Concerto does not in general lack for performances or recordings. But it has not been heard at the Academy of Music since its premiere by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy in 1941, with violinist Albert Spalding. Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg performs the concerto tonight, tomorrow and Tuesday under Riccardo Muti's direction. Rounding out this weekend's subscription program are Prokofiev's "Classical" Symphony and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 4. Philadelphia Orchestra, Riccardo Muti directing, at the Academy of Music, Broad & Locust Streets, tonight at 8, tomorrow and Tue. Tickets: $10-$60; $5 student tickets available with ID one-half hour before Mon-Thu subscription concerts; $2.50 unreserved amphitheater seats on sale one hour before Fri-Sat concerts.
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra played its American program last night in the second of its concerts in the International Musical Festival here. It was not the American music, or even a bounding reading of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5, that made the strongest impact. It was the encore, Verdi's "Overture" to I Vespri Siciliani - played at hair-raising speed and charged with theatrical gesture - that brought an instant roar from an audience noted for its restraint. Conductor Riccardo Muti had not played an encore Saturday in the first of the concerts, but the audience last night would not let him leave the stage.
NEWS
July 24, 2008 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Choosing an encore can be a squidgy business, and on a night such as Tuesday at the Mann Center, with the air still vibrating from a voluble Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1, pianist Jon Kimura Parker offered exactly what was least expected: a quiet Joplin rag called Solace. It was a risk. The Mann's lawns were thickly populated for the Philadelphia Orchestra's annual all-Tchaikovsky program and fireworks - or rather, fireworks and all-Tchaikovsky - and crowds were already milling about when Parker started his encore.
NEWS
June 19, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Six months ago, when Media Theatre mounted Stephen Temperley's 2005 musical, Souvenir, artistic director Jesse Cline heard calls for an encore. So the suburban company has brought this quirky, endearing production to the Wilma Theater's stage, with the Wilma ponying up half its production costs. Barrymore winner Ann Crumb returns as the irrepressible Florence Foster Jenkins, and Larry Daggett steps into Carl Danielsen's former spot as Jenkins' longtime accompanist, Cosme McMoon. All this effort is conducted in the service of the show's subject, Madame Flo, wartime society songbird.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1998 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
That Alanis Morissette sure can make a list. On her much-anticipated Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie (Maverick 1/2), which arrives in stores Tuesday, the siren-throated Canadian inventories the things she has to be grateful for ("Thank You"); the roles a lover played in her life ("Sympathetic Character"); her personality flaws ("One," which begins, "I am the biggest hypocrite, I have been undeniably jealous"); and the things she embraced on her quest for spiritual enlightenment ("Would Not Come")
NEWS
October 8, 2012
* TITANIC: BLOOD & STEEL. 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday, Encore. TURNS OUT it took a bit longer to build the Titanic than it did to sink it. James Cameron's "Titanic" clocked in at 3 hours, 14 minutes. "Titanic: Blood & Steel," a 12-part miniseries filmed in Ireland about the events leading up to the April 1912 disaster, will get a six-night run on Encore this week, starting Monday. The broadcast networks used to build them big like this, back in the '70s and '80s, before anyone dreamed that there'd someday be so many channels we'd have "Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. " Though I'm pretty sure that even in the days when Pug Henry (Robert Mitchum)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
KURORT RATHEN, Germany - Even on days when the Philadelphia Orchestra doesn't have to move around Europe, some rogue contingent does so anyway, popping over to some neighboring city to meet an old teacher, or, more ambitiously, going in search of the Grand Budapest Hotel. The actual hotel exterior in the super-scenic, Oscar-winning film of that name was a made-for-studio model, obviously not to be found in quaint Kurort Rathen, a half-hour's train ride from Dresden. But the film was shot in the Saxony region, one of whose most spectacular outdoor locations is the bizarrely gnarled sandstone mountains overlooking an ex-duchy known as Königstein.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The trademark red concert dress and ebullient stage presence told you that Di Wu was back, the Chinese-born, Curtis Institute-trained pianist who has become something of a local favorite as part of the Astral Artists roster. On Wednesday, she returned to the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, but in a recital that made you wonder if she is her own best advocate. Nobody really knows how long-term audience relationships are cultivated, but Wu's program of Haydn, Brahms, and Prokofiev wasn't the sort to advance her presence here.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emily Lipari admits that her journey from high school star to NCAA champion for Villanova has included its share of rough patches, but the road has been smoother since her spectacular achievements at last year's Penn Relays. Lipari anchored the Wildcats to a pair of Championship of America titles in the distance medley and 4x800-meter relays, leading her team to a collegiate record in the latter race. In the fall, she finished fifth in the NCAA cross-country championships, and she capped her indoor season last month by capturing the women's mile in the NCAA track and field meet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
"This song is old," Ella Yelich-O'Connor explained on stage at the Tower Theater Saturday night, by which she meant "Bravado" dates all the way back to 2012. But if the timeline for the 17-year-old, who performs as Lorde, is short, it's also eventful. Her first recording, a free online EP called The Love Club , was released in late 2013; a hotly anticipated album, Pure Heroine , followed in September; last night, on her first U.S. tour, she had the sold-out Tower singing along to her version of the Replacements' "Swingin' Party," recorded before most ticketholders were born.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You could spend a lifetime delving into all of Franz Liszt's roles as Western music's great change agent. Or you might simply have listened in Tuesday, as pianist Louis Lortie laid them bare before a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society audience. At the American Philosophical Society, with oils of Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin gazing down from the stage, Liszt rivaled the radical old patriots for conjuring a new world. In our time, Wagner may be the most frequently referenced starting point of modern music; opera as a medium has an obvious edge.
SPORTS
December 11, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keenan Reynolds had told himself that his first Army-Navy game would be just like any other college football contest. But as he rode on the Navy bus to Lincoln Financial Field and saw the parking lots at the sports complex teeming with tailgating fans for both sides, that thought was on shaky ground. "I was definitely pretty nervous, especially riding to the stadium and seeing the pageantry of the game, and everything kind of sunk in," Reynolds said Monday. The first freshman to start an Army-Navy game in 21 years, Reynolds shook off the nerves and led the Midshipmen to their 11th straight victory, scoring the go-ahead touchdown on an 8-yard run with less than five minutes to play in a 17-13 final.
SPORTS
November 16, 2013 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTA - The big question is: Will James Anderson do it again? The 76ers shooting guard will get his first opportunity Friday night against the Atlanta Hawks at Philips Arena. And if Anderson does it here, the Sixers (5-4) should handle the Hawks (4-4). The 6-foot-6, 215-pounder scored a career-high 36 points in Wednesday's 123-117 overtime victory against the Houston Rockets. It was the most points by a Sixer since Willie Green scored 37 against the Toronto Raptors on April 18, 2007.
NEWS
August 31, 2013
Philadelphians have learned to expect disaster, even - or especially - when promised an extravaganza. So one neighborhood leader's assessment of last year's inaugural Made in America festival on the Parkway counts as a glowing review: "It wasn't the catastrophe many feared. " Popular sentiment about the two-day, three-stage, multi-act music festival being reprised this weekend, presented by Anheuser Busch and Live Nation, has evolved from general trepidation to widespread welcome, as The Inquirer's Jeff Gammage reported this week.
SPORTS
August 8, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple linebacker Tyler Matakevich is the perfect example of an athlete making the most of an opportunity when it is presented. Thrust into the starting lineup against South Florida, Matakevich, a true freshman last season, racked up 15 tackles - 12 solos and three assists - in a 37-28 triumph. Before that game, he had just one tackle in three games. He never stopped tackling, finishing the season with 101, the most in school history by a true freshman. He became the 12th Owl to earn freshman all-American honors, the first since Bernard Pierce in 2009, and the first to earn first-team honors since Dan Klecko in 1999.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Westmont, a nearly 86-year-old former movie palace in Haddon Township, may be getting a new lease on life. Township officials and Lazgor L.L.C., a Cherry Hill real estate development firm, are exploring Lazgor's buying and rehabilitating the old theater, which has been vacant for at least a decade. Depending on how those negotiations go, by late August the township and Lazgor could enter a nine-month agreement to forge a redevelopment plan. And while few - if any - are expecting a revival of the Westmont's cinematic glory days, preservationists and other theater fans are hoping for some performing-arts or community-use space, and would most like to see a performing arts center.
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