CollectionsEnd Of Life
IN THE NEWS

End Of Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 1, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As state legislatures nationwide move to address the myriad issues raised by the Terri Schiavo case, a Pennsylvania lawmaker says he plans to revive legislation vetoed last year by Gov. Rendell aimed at dealing with family disputes over end-of-life care. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Stewart J. Greenleaf (R., Bucks), would establish which person has priority in deciding care for a dying patient who has not established a living will or power of attorney. "If there is a dispute among family members, it will set up a structure for physicians and look at under what conditions we should let the courts decide," Greenleaf said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Salvator Mundi, the portrait of Christ by Renaissance master Antonello da Messina, stares through you. It doesn't matter how you address the beneficent visage, which looms over the stage during On the Concept of the Face Regarding the Son of God . It doesn't matter whether you believe in Jesus as a divine power; his gaze burrows into you as it burned into Romeo Castellucci. "He called me as a man, not as God," says the provocative Italian theater practitioner, whose play runs Thursday through Saturday at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre as part of the 2013 Fringe Festival.
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
This was the sort of situation that made surgeon Karl Ahlswede think there had to be a better way to die and, maybe, a better way to be a doctor: One of his patients, an elderly woman, had survived cancer and heart surgery, but had landed in the intensive care unit with pneumonia. She had been on a breathing machine for 10 days, and her family was facing a tough decision. Should it allow doctors to insert a feeding tube and do a procedure that would insert a breathing tube into her neck rather than through her mouth?
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | By Scott Robinson FOR THE INQUIRER
The Rev. Charles Beaty has a wife and three young children, with another child due in July. He also has terminal cancer. Mr. Beaty, a Southern Baptist pastor in Kansas City, participates in a new interfaith initiative designed to equip clergy and congregations to minister to dying people. Called Compassion Sabbath, the program was started in Kansas City by the Midwest Bioethics Center a little over a year ago. It is already being replicated around the country, a growth that organizers say shows the need for guidance and support in end-of-life ministry.
NEWS
April 16, 2010 | By Terri McEntee
If you've ever tried to talk with a teenager about drugs or sex, you know how difficult it is to broach a sensitive topic with a loved one. But, as difficult as those conversations are, there's one that's even tougher. According to a survey by the National Healthcare Decisions Day coalition, Americans are less likely to talk to a seriously ill parent about his or her end-of-life wishes than they are to have the "birds and the bees" or "just say no" talk with a child. It's no surprise that people avoid talking about the end of life.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Narcotics laws and policies should be changed so that dying people won't have to choose between a painful death and suicide, a group of leading medical experts recommended yesterday. The Institute of Medicine's Committee on Care at the End of Life said doctors should be encouraged to freely prescribe powerful pain-killers to relieve the suffering of terminally ill patients. "To be miserable or kill yourself - that's not the only option," said Robert Burt, a Yale Law School professor and committee member.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Can art exist outside the world of museums, galleries, schools and community art centers? Yes, says Lankenau Hospital, which is sponsoring an exhibit, "Art Endures," about end-of-life issues (coincidentally a hot-button topic in the news during the painful debate over Terri Schiavo). Lankenau is hosting a 70-item juried exhibit by 50 artists, a spin-off of its recent conference of health-care professionals on end-of-life issues. The exhibit is the first in a projected series of such conference-related art exhibits at the new Walter and Leonore Annenberg Conference Center for Medical Education.
NEWS
April 1, 2005
JUST WHEN we thought a clear majority of Americans couldn't agree on anything anymore, the Terri Schiavo case provoked a rare consensus: Most Americans (more than 80 percent in some polls) would not want to be kept alive in a persistent vegetative state, which all credible medical evidence showed Terri Schiavo to be - and which an autopsy now will prove. Most Americans (also 80 percent) think Congress and the president should have kept their hands out of the Florida state court's decisions.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The leaders of the nation's effort to improve care of the dying met in Washington last week to assess their progress. The conclusion was clear: They have come a long way, enthusiasm and energy are high, but making significant change is like walking through concrete walls. At the meeting of Last Acts, a group of more than 70 organizations dedicated to improving end-of-life care, conferees highlighted progress in many states - New York, Colorado, Florida and Maryland among them - and tried to determine how to move the country along faster.
NEWS
November 13, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The parish nurse ministry of Our Mother of Good Counsel and St. Thomas of Villanova, will hold a seminar on living wills and end-of-life decisions from 9:30 a.m. to noon tomorrow at St. Thomas of Villanova, Rosemont Auditorium, 1229 W. Lancaster Ave., Rosemont. Presenters include Bonnie Carolan-McNulty, Maureen McCullough, James D. Plumb, and the Rev. Donald Reilly. A discussion on "Ecumenism and Interreligious Dialogue: Progress and Pitfalls on the Path to the Millennium," will be held at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Rosemont College, McShain Performing Arts Center, 1400 Montgomery Ave. Leonard Swidler, professor of Catholic thought and interreligious dialogue, will be the presenter.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Over the last few decades, Philadelphia has become known as the juvenile-lifer capital of the world, home to 300 people sentenced as teens to die in prison. That era is rapidly drawing to a close. Two men locked up since the 1970s received new sentences Friday, making them eligible for parole immediately. It marks the start of a resentencing process in the city that could take up to three years. By the end of it, District Attorney Seth Williams expects almost no juveniles will be sentenced to life without parole - a fate the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Miller v. Alabama in 2012 must be "uncommon," reserved for the "rare juvenile offender whose crime reflects irreparable corruption.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
When she filled out the advance directive form, Lisa Curcio, who has metastatic breast cancer, made it clear that she does not want aggressive measures as the end nears. "If my body can't function on its own, then my body is telling me it's time to go," said Curcio, a 44-year-old Levittown accounting clerk. She's currently responding well to treatment but knows that her cancer is likely to be deadly. Faced with the same questions, Matthew Bellina, a 32-year-old with the fatal neurological disease ALS, said he wanted to go all out. The Holland, Pa., man has two young boys and he wants every last second with them, even if he can only move one eyelid.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
The United States compares well to six other developed nations on some measures of end-of-life care, such as the percentage of patients who die in the hospital, but we're still on the pricey side, according to the first international comparison of its kind. Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the department of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania, was senior author of the paper, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. It compared site of death, health-care use, and hospital cost for cancer patients over 65 in Belgium, Canada, England, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the U.S. Among the findings: The U.S. had the lowest proportion of patients die in acute-care hospitals, 22.2 percent.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may be the fact that Atul Gawande is a doctor - a Harvard doctor, yet - that draws readers to his books on our flawed medical system. But he wouldn't make the best-seller lists if he wrote - or thought - like most doctors. This is a guy with one of those renaissance-man resum├ęs that makes even quite accomplished people look like slackers. Stanford undergrad. Rhodes scholar studying philosophy. Health-care adviser to President Bill Clinton. Medical degree and master's in public health from Harvard.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brittany Maynard and the Death With Dignity movement have received significant attention this fall, but one stalwart in end-of-life care says the push for physician-assisted suicide is premature, and distracts from a much more important issue. Joanne Lynn, a geriatrician, hospice physician, former Medicare medical director, and author, has spent her career fighting to improve care of the dying. She says laws such as Oregon's - allowing terminally ill, mentally competent people such as Maynard, with six months or less to live, to end their lives - would not be applicable to most Americans.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the hospice nurse called police in the assisted-suicide case of Barbara Mancini, David Casarett knew he had work to do. He feared that the actions of one hospice nurse could discourage Americans from using that model of palliative care for the terminally ill, or inhibit dying people in pain from taking morphine. So Casarett, a University of Pennsylvania physician and chief medical officer of Penn-Wissahickon Hospice, teamed with law professor Thaddeus Pope, formerly of Widener University and an expert in end-of-life law, to develop ethical guidelines for hospice workers nationwide on when to report suspicions of assisted suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Salvator Mundi, the portrait of Christ by Renaissance master Antonello da Messina, stares through you. It doesn't matter how you address the beneficent visage, which looms over the stage during On the Concept of the Face Regarding the Son of God . It doesn't matter whether you believe in Jesus as a divine power; his gaze burrows into you as it burned into Romeo Castellucci. "He called me as a man, not as God," says the provocative Italian theater practitioner, whose play runs Thursday through Saturday at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre as part of the 2013 Fringe Festival.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For the Inquirer
Bruce Graham's fine new play, The Outgoing Tide, at the Philadelphia Theatre Company, is deeply moving and surprisingly funny, a straight-talking, unpretentious meditation on Alzheimer's and end-of-life suffering: "Quality of life. Kiss my ass. " Directed with invisible finesse and strength by James J. Christy, the excellent cast provides bedrock realism, refusing any of the topic's maudlin possibilities. The fact is, Gunner (Richard Poe), a tough guy who ran a trucking company and dealt with the Teamsters, is losing his memory and his mind; he still has enough left to plan his exit, refusing to settle for years of humiliating deterioration in a "home.
SPORTS
January 23, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The tragedies pile one atop the next, like snow across the central hills, and the latest is that Joe Paterno, hectored by cancer and battered by the events of the last three months, lost his last battle with the clock on Sunday morning. Family and friends were called to the hospital throughout the day Saturday as the 85-year-old former coach's condition deteriorated and the final vigil began. There is nothing but sadness that all of it has happened. There was only that while reporting the story of child abuse that emerged from the Penn State campus, and only regret, a regret shared by Paterno, that more wasn't done to deal with a predator in their midst.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Bruce Shipkowski, Associated Press
TRENTON - Two measures that proponents say would make decisions about end-of-life care easier for New Jerseyans and their families have been sent to Gov. Christie's desk. One bill would mandate that the state create a document enabling patients to indicate their preferences regarding life-sustaining treatment. The other would create an advisory council to study the quality and cost-effectiveness of end-of-life care services and how easily they can be accessed. The Senate and Assembly overwhelmingly approved both measures last month.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|