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Energizer Bunny

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NEWS
December 8, 1994 | by Sandy Sorlein, Special to the Daily News
You'd think Christmas would have been Thomas Edison's favorite holiday. After all, his amazing inventions enable us to flood our neighborhoods with blinking Santas, listen to recorded Christmas music, attend holiday movies, put batteries in our toys. That's right, we can even blame Edison for the Energizer Bunny. But Edison, an agnostic, preferred the Fourth of July. I learned this bit of trivia on a tour of Edison's house in West Orange, N.J., just after my tour of his laboratories there, and just before a visit to the site of his first lab in nearby Menlo Park.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | MICHAEL S. WIRTZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
With more stamina than the Energizer Bunny, Mick Jagger belts out "Jumpin' Jack Flash" at the opening of last night's "No Security" concert at the First Union Center. Jagger, Keith Richards and rest of the lads will repeat the performance tonight. It was the Rolling Stones' first indoor concert here in 23 years.
SPORTS
June 22, 2011 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia area has long been a hotbed for top-flight basketball talent. Wilt Chamberlain, arguably the greatest to play the game, was a skinny post player at Overbrook High in the 1950s. Kobe Bryant led Lower Merion to a Pennsylvania state title in 1996, just months before the NBA snatched him up in the first round. Camden's Dajuan Wagner scored 100 points in a single game in 2001. Some of the area's current up-and-comers were on display at last week's National Basketball Players Association Top 100 Camp at the University of the Virginia.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry L. Moore never stopped moving. Born in tiny Ocilla, Ga., in 1921, he was out by 19, after graduating at the top of Ocilla High's Class of 1940. He moved to Newark, N.J., to escape the poverty and racism that had marked his childhood. By 1942, he was on a bus full of draftees en route to Fort Dix, and by 1944, he was in Italy, working on B-25 bombers as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen - the first black aviators to serve in the U.S. military. Then it was off to West Virginia State University, where he earned a physics degree, and a career as a naval researcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1995 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If Speed was Die Hard on a bus, Die Hard With a Vengeance is Speed on a bad day. An imitation of an imitation, the second sequel in Bruce Willis' wiseguy- cop-saves-the-world franchise is a work of numbing violence unredeemed by wit or invention. A coldblooded collection of action-movie cliches and extravagant stunts, Die Hard With a Vengeance opens with a bomb blast that levels a Manhattan department store and proceeds apace with a plot involving German terrorists threatening to detonate 2,400-pounds of explosives planted in a New York public school.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | BY ANN GERHART Daily News staff writer Jonathan Takiff and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "How come when you mix water and flour together, you get glue . . . and then you add eggs and sugar and you get cake? Where does the glue go?" - Rita Rudner HOWARD WRETCH TAUNTS DEBELLA Vicious. The man is vicious. Not content with having bounced WMMR jock John DeBella from the morning, arch-rival Howard Stern is allowing WYSP to now replay "Best of Stern" tapes for free opposite DeBella's new afternoon show. This generosity is "in honor of DeBella still not coming to me and asking my permission to go to the afternoon," explained the self-anointed "King of All Media.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Ron Goldwyn contributed to this report
Most Mummers fans are aware of the tragic losses suffered by the Froggy Carr comic brigade at the past two parades. In 1995, police confiscated the Frogs' beer along the parade route. Last January, their beer wagon caught on fire in a blaze so intense it boiled up their suds. But this isn't a story of crying over spilt beer. It's about the Jolly Rogers (and Paddys and Mikeys) of the Pirates comic brigade who sailed to the Frogs' rescue and provided more beer to cry in. "We shared beer again, second year in a row," said Pirates Captain Joe Kirlin.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Ida Muni, the family focal point for food, fun and love, died Nov. 24 of an apparent heart attack. She was 76 and lived in the Far Northeast. "She was always busy, taking care of her much-loved grandchildren, cooking one of her famous feasts, or making her house sparkle. She put those of us who were much younger to shame. She was our own dear Energizer Bunny - she kept going and going and going . . . ," said her daughter, Diane Counts. "If you knew Ida, then you know what it is to celebrate," said Counts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1993 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Like the broadcast he created, Don Hewitt just keeps going and going and going. "I'm like the Energizer bunny," says the legendary executive producer of CBS News' 60 Minutes, who turns 71 next month. "I wonder why the fatigue factor has not set in. After 25 years, you would assume I wouldn't have the energy to carry on like a madman. " Hewitt's madness notwithstanding, there's nothing crazy about 60 Minutes. Just into its 26th season, Hewitt's extraordinary newsbaby holds the mantle as the most popular - and most lucrative - program in TV history, having made more than $1 billion for CBS. As a tribute to its in-house mint, the network is throwing a 25th- anniversary black-tie gala for 600 swells on Wednesday at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In addition, a two-hour 60 Minutes retrospective will air next Sunday in the newsmagazine's golden 7 p.m. time slot.
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NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry L. Moore never stopped moving. Born in tiny Ocilla, Ga., in 1921, he was out by 19, after graduating at the top of Ocilla High's Class of 1940. He moved to Newark, N.J., to escape the poverty and racism that had marked his childhood. By 1942, he was on a bus full of draftees en route to Fort Dix, and by 1944, he was in Italy, working on B-25 bombers as a member of the Tuskegee Airmen - the first black aviators to serve in the U.S. military. Then it was off to West Virginia State University, where he earned a physics degree, and a career as a naval researcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2011
I'M NOT QUITE ready to declare Hugh Hefner the new Betty White, but for an 85-year-old guy who spends most of the day in his PJs, he's having an interesting year: * In January, the Playboy founder took his struggling company private, decades after giving up financial control of the empire that now includes a nearly 60-year-old magazine, Playboy TV and other adult entertainment properties and a licensing division responsible for seeing that...
SPORTS
June 22, 2011 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia area has long been a hotbed for top-flight basketball talent. Wilt Chamberlain, arguably the greatest to play the game, was a skinny post player at Overbrook High in the 1950s. Kobe Bryant led Lower Merion to a Pennsylvania state title in 1996, just months before the NBA snatched him up in the first round. Camden's Dajuan Wagner scored 100 points in a single game in 2001. Some of the area's current up-and-comers were on display at last week's National Basketball Players Association Top 100 Camp at the University of the Virginia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2002 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bad news for hockey fans: In the year 2024, the sport with the sticks, the puck, and the body checks on ice will be outlawed. At least, that's what the 25th-century archaeology students who discover the frozen body of one Jason Voorhees, still wearing the "facial armor" of the banned game, report in Jason X - the murky ninth sequel in the Friday the 13th horror series, and the first to propel its cutlery-wielding masked maniac well into the...
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | MICHAEL S. WIRTZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
With more stamina than the Energizer Bunny, Mick Jagger belts out "Jumpin' Jack Flash" at the opening of last night's "No Security" concert at the First Union Center. Jagger, Keith Richards and rest of the lads will repeat the performance tonight. It was the Rolling Stones' first indoor concert here in 23 years.
NEWS
December 7, 1998 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Ida Muni, the family focal point for food, fun and love, died Nov. 24 of an apparent heart attack. She was 76 and lived in the Far Northeast. "She was always busy, taking care of her much-loved grandchildren, cooking one of her famous feasts, or making her house sparkle. She put those of us who were much younger to shame. She was our own dear Energizer Bunny - she kept going and going and going . . . ," said her daughter, Diane Counts. "If you knew Ida, then you know what it is to celebrate," said Counts.
NEWS
June 12, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Steve Nesmith is sort of like the Energizer bunny. Whether he's shaking hands at a cocktail party or making strides in his burgeoning political career, he just keeps going and going and going. And the night the Daily News invited him to dinner at his favorite restaurant, Noodle Heaven, was no exception. The Center City attorney arrived promptly at 6 p.m., only to immediately dash out again to mail a Federal Express package. Minutes later he was back, panting slightly, with a bottle of wine tucked under his arm. (Noodle Heaven doesn't have a liquor license)
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joan Aiken, the grande dame of historical aesthetics in Haddonfield - the self-proclaimed watchdog of the borough's past, present and future - has found herself shut out of the very Historic Preservation Commission that she helped found 25 years ago. And that won't slow down the 76-year-old one bit, she says. "I'm gearing up for saving Haddonfield," she said, lightly touching her perpetually coiffed hair and batting her eyelashes. Her eyes sparkled with as-yet-untold plans for saving the borough from itself.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Ron Goldwyn contributed to this report
Most Mummers fans are aware of the tragic losses suffered by the Froggy Carr comic brigade at the past two parades. In 1995, police confiscated the Frogs' beer along the parade route. Last January, their beer wagon caught on fire in a blaze so intense it boiled up their suds. But this isn't a story of crying over spilt beer. It's about the Jolly Rogers (and Paddys and Mikeys) of the Pirates comic brigade who sailed to the Frogs' rescue and provided more beer to cry in. "We shared beer again, second year in a row," said Pirates Captain Joe Kirlin.
SPORTS
July 26, 1995 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
When it was announced that Rich Ashburn had been voted into the Hall of Fame, the people of Tilden could not have been happier, not just for Rich, but for his elderly mother. In the course of her 91 years, Genevieve "Toots" Ashburn seems to have touched everyone here with her kindness. When husbands or wives have been been sick or in need, she has stood over the stove for hours whipping up an apple pie or a plate of her fabulous biscuits to send over. You hear it everywhere in Tilden: "Everybody loves Toots.
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