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NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
U.S. Rep. Peter H. Kostmayer has assumed the chairmanship of the House Interior subcommittee on energy and the environment, a position that could broaden his influence over national energy policy and critical environmental issues facing Bucks County. Members of Congress are allowed to chair only one subcommittee, so Kostmayer is giving up his chairmanship of the subcommittee on general oversight and investigations. He called his move to the energy and environment panel "a step up. This is a subcommittee which is going to be very deeply involved in the writing of a national energy policy over the next two years," Kostmayer said.
SPORTS
October 18, 1990 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Eagles defensive lineman Mike Golic catches a little rest on top of some mats at Veterans Stadium before practicing for Sunday's game against the Redskins in Washington.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
At 9:02 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 29, my 8-year-old son came barreling up our basement stairs, screaming, "What happened?" Our electricity had shut off due to Hurricane Sandy, as it had for hundreds of thousands along the East Coast. We were prepared with candles, flashlights, and a spontaneous game of charades played out in our living room. But this event occurs in thousands of homes in Philadelphia without hurricane winds or fallen trees. Children emerge from basements citywide with the same fear and confusion as my son's, but games do not spontaneously occur.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Gordon St. John
I had my first taste of gasoline the other day. Well, to be honest, it shot down my throat so fast (through the hose I was using as a siphon) that I didn't actually have time to savor it. However, over the next 24 hours, I had a small sense of what the fish, fowl, and other fauna of the Gulf of Mexico must be experiencing. Like many Americans, I have watched in horror as the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion has unfolded. But once I have heard enough bad news for a day, I turn off the television or put down the paper and go back to my comfortable, energy-intensive lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | By Deni Kasrel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Flamenco Ole's performance at the Movement Theatre International Saturday night emitted a fiery energy. Graceful hand gestures and staccato foot stomps make flamenco a uniquely subtle and symbolic style of dance. Add a guitarist - playing sounds from gently lyrical to full-throttle strum - to accompany and punctuate these movements. On Saturday, a hand drummer provided extra accents. A male singer's plaintive vocals embodied the soulfulness of a cantorial chant joined with the theatrical passion of an operatic aria.
NEWS
November 5, 2007 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Creative and inquisitive, 10-year-old Jay has an endearing personality and a cheerful smile that draws people to him. He makes friends easily. Always on the go, he channels his abundant energy into a variety of sports. It's no surprise that his favorite animal is the cheetah. He loves to ride his bike and scooter, and readily participates in any activity that requires vigorous playing. In school, Jay is enrolled in a specialized educational program where the one-on-one support he receives is helping him accomplish his academic goals.
NEWS
July 5, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
He's going to be a firefighter, or maybe a police officer, when he grows up. Jimmy isn't quite sure what his career will be, but the 10-year-old is determined that it will involve helping people. For now, his efforts include working in the yard with his foster father, assisting his teacher by passing out and collecting papers, and patiently explaining the intricacies of math, his favorite subject, to some of his fellow students. Full of energy, Jimmy enjoys many activities - outdoor sports, bike riding, arts and crafts, and playing video games.
LIVING
June 24, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the social worker comes to visit Andrew, he runs to her for a hug and bubbles over with the latest news. "See my muscle?" he proudly asks. "See how tall I am?" (He weighs 82 pounds and is 4 feet tall.) "He's full of energy" the worker reports, "and not withdrawn as he could be with his background. "Though Andrew, 9, has neglect and abuse in his past, he has made a good adjustment in his foster home," his worker says, "and he would do well in a family with an older or younger child so he could get individual attention.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
A pickup game of basketball can be organized in short order for Elymas, 13, since he lives in a residential center with eight other boys. They ride bikes around a field in back of the house, too, and play kickball and football and go roller-skating. Elymas' favorite sport is soccer. Whether he's defending the goal or scoring, he plays as hard as he can. Indoors, he builds model airplanes, and has shown skill in taking stereos and handheld fans apart and reassembling them.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
The fossil-fuel lobby's desperate defense of the largest source of anthropogenic carbon pollution, coal-fired electricity plants, could choke Pennsylvania's efforts to tailor federal pollution control efforts to the state's needs and take advantage of more promising energy resources. Instead of helping people who depend on coal for power and a living make the transition to cleaner, more sustainable energy sources and jobs, industry leaders are trying to stall President Obama's Clean Power Plan, which aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants to 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2016
By Tom Borelli Plans for a new oil pipeline just went up in flames - literally. This summer, radical environmentalists in Iowa set fire to pipeline construction equipment, causing nearly $1 million in damages. The incident was hardly isolated. Environmentalists nationwide are desperately working to stop pipeline construction. In Massachusetts, for example, several protesters locked themselves to their cars - with bike locks - in an effort to block construction of a pipeline in West Roxbury.
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Electing renewable-energy backers is critical Pope Francis provided heroic leadership in his call to all people of faith to adopt personal practices of environmental stewardship, such as turning off lights not in use and taking public transportation or carpooling ("Pope elevates care for planet to an eighth work of mercy," Friday). Framing them as "works of mercy" makes a clear connection between environmental stewardship and spiritual practice. While these small acts of personal environmental piety are a necessary foundation, they will not be enough to bend the arc of climate change toward a sustainable environment.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Patrick M. Cicero
NATIONWIDE, low-income households spend an average of three times as much of their income on energy as higher income households, in large part because of energy-inefficient housing. Low-income households here in Pennsylvania are among the hardest hit in the entire country, according to a recent study by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy and Energy Efficiency for All, a coalition of affordable housing, environmental and low-income advocates. State energy efficiency programs can help reduce the disproportionate energy burden borne by low-income households and should be continually improved upon to provide needed relief for Pennsylvania families.
NEWS
August 31, 2016
Back when he was working full-time in New Jersey, instead of trekking campaign trails for himself or an old chum, Gov. Christie signed a bill laying the foundation for his state to lead the nation in helping the fledgling wind energy industry expand to the sea. Funny how that changed once Christie began his run for president. Other than blowing his own hot air, he lost interest in wind power. Under Christie's direction, the state Board of Public Utilities created bureaucratic delays to impede the progress of an industry that had already received federal funding to locate turbines three miles off the Atlantic City coast.
NEWS
August 21, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You don't need a problem to push you to be your best. Improvement is in your nature. In fact, you've already improved to such a high level that you're not sure where to go next. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You're not going to switch jobs today or tomorrow but you can see a dot on that employment horizon, growing as it nears you. Change is coming. Question: If money were no issue, where do you think you might like to fit in? GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Is the moment lush with silence, or is it awkward with the tension of not knowing what to say?
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I am 32 years old and divorced my wife two years ago. Although I tried dating for a bit, it was a brave new world of online apps and profiles. It wasn't for me, and I became discouraged. A year has gone by, and female friends are telling me I need to get back out and date. I find the whole endeavor depressing and prefer to spend my time elsewhere and single. They say my decision to stay single is emotionally driven, that I "deserve love. " My argument against dating is that I wasn't a good husband, and I have no interest in devoting the time or energy to date in the scary and confusing world of the web. Can you settle this dispute so that we can stop the back-and-forth arguments?
SPORTS
July 30, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
For Jason Peters, it's good that the new boss is the same as the old boss - or, that is, the older boss. The Eagles tackle, after Chip Kelly was fired last December, said that he wanted the replacement to be in the mold of Kelly's predecessor, Andy Reid. Peters got his wish. The Eagles hired Doug Pederson. But they also hired a coach who is, in many ways, the polar opposite of Kelly. And that appeared to be as much of Peters' motivation for wanting a Reid clone as was re-creating the four prior years (record: 33-31)
NEWS
July 23, 2016
By David Spigelmyer While the daily headlines and nonstop, 24-hour news cycles focus overwhelmingly on issues that often divide the nation, it can be easy to lose sight of where common ground exists and what shared commitments bring us together. And there's more that unites us - business and labor as well as Republicans, Democrats, and independents - than divides us. While division might drive TV ratings and social-media clicks, it's no secret that all Americans support a stronger economy with low unemployment; a thriving manufacturing sector that creates middle-class jobs for families; and a healthier, cleaner environment for our kids and grandkids.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
More than 66,000 Pennsylvanians worked last year in the clean energy industry at 5,900 businesses, up 15.7 percent from 2014, according to a report compiled by two advocacy groups. About 53,000 Pennsylvanians work in the energy-efficiency sector, including manufacturers of equipment and installers of high-efficiency systems, according to the report by the Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance and Environmental Entrepreneurs. Another 8,800 worked in renewable energy, including about 5,200 who spend at least half their time working in solar.
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