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Energy Audit

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LIVING
February 26, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: My husband and I want to get an energy audit of our home and are having difficulty locating a company. We live in Aston, Delaware County. Can you give me any ideas on how to locate an independent company that has no vested interest in selling doors, windows, or a new furnace? Answer: In Pennsylvania, you can start with www.pahomeenergy.com. There are public-utility and government sites in every state that offer step-by-step information on do-it-yourself home-energy audits, but it is probably wise to bring in a qualified professional to do the work.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Franklin Township officials have, you might say, seen the light in their quest to save money. The answer . . . is light bulbs. If more efficient beacons were used in place of 554 of the 562 light bulbs in municipal hall, the township could save $2,883 on its annual lighting bill, which averages $10,250. That's the conclusion of Atlantic Electric, which recently conducted an energy audit at the 30-year-old township headquarters on Delsea Drive. Perhaps $2,900 may seem like a drop in the bucket for a town with an overall budget of $7.4 million.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An engineering firm that employs a member of the school board has offered to provide a free service to the district - an energy audit of several aging elementary school buildings. Honeywell Inc., where board member Norman Long is a project manager, volunteered to do the audit last month during a presentation to the board's facilities committee. Citing a conflict of interest, Long, who is chairman of that committee, recused himself from any vote or discussion on the matter. Board members are expected to consider the offer in a meeting tonight.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
With so much focus on energy efficiency these days, it's hard to believe that dozens of South Jersey municipalities haven't applied for $20,000 in no-strings grants to conduct energy audits that could point to substantial savings. The grants, plus funding to implement energy efficiencies, are available through a federal stimulus program under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. With a deadline to apply of Dec. 31, it's good to see that the energy audits are being promoted by volunteers in the "Jersey Call to Service," a program of the Citizens' Campaign, which seeks to involve citizens in their communities.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Joe Ponessa, who spent 25 years as a housing, indoor environment and health specialist at Rutgers Cooperative Extension, responded to a recent column about mold testing. He said much of what he knows about mold remediation comes from associating with some of the top mold people in the country. Concerning testing, he said the sentiment is generally against it: "If you can see and/or smell mold, it's there. " Testing provides little practical information, although there are some occasions when it is justified: lawsuit evidence, doctor's request, validation of the effectiveness of a large, expensive cleanup, etc. The most meaningful testing, air sampling, is expensive.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Sharon Hill Borough engineers got the go-ahead last week to draw up plans for an elevator that would make the second floor of the firehouse more accessible for a senior citizens' group. The council voted, 6-1, Thursday night to allow engineers H. Gilroy Damon Associates Inc. to prepare specifications for the plan. Council member Dominic F. Corvaia voted against it. "I think it's a waste of money," Corvaia said after the meeting. "We have better uses for that money. " Corvaia said he would rather see the money spent on a new word processor and computer system.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peco Energy - and the Eagles! - are touting energy conservation. That's the idea behind the Philadelphia utility's latest promotion, which kicks off Saturday in South Philadelphia, though not at the Linc. Instead, courtesy of Peco, fans will be able to visit with one of today's favorite Eagles, tight end Brent Celek, two stars from yesteryear, Troy Vincent and Mike Quick, and the voice of the Eagles, Merrill Reese, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Home Depot's store at 1651 South Columbus Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I live in a 55-year-old stone and brick Colonial in Elkins Park. We are hoping to leave the house in five to 10 years. It is almost paid for, but based on recent sale prices, is not worth a great deal more than we paid for it - $200,000. I had an energy audit done, and contracted with the same firm to do some work to dry out the basement. They found mold, apparently the result of a broken plumbing line. They did testing - two spots in the basement, the ductwork and apparently of a very bad situation in the attic.
NEWS
November 23, 2003 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
The buildings that make up St. Timothy's Parish at Levick and Hawthorne Streets in Northeast Philadelphia are vastly larger and more complex than the red-brick rowhouses that surround them. More expensive to operate, too. A glance at St. Timothy's electric, gas and water bills tells this story: Last year, the parish spent more than $120,000 for gas, about $60,000 for electricity, and close to $19,000 for water for its church, three-building school, convent, rectory, and two-story, four-car garage.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey grant program that funds energy-efficiency upgrades at no cost to local governments closes next week, and nearly a third of the 512 eligible municipalities and counties - including dozens of South Jersey towns - have not enrolled. The program provides up to $50,000 for upgrades to lighting, heating, and cooling systems in municipal and county buildings with no matching funds required. A ratepayer-funded clean-energy program pays 60 percent. The remainder is federal stimulus money that must be allocated by March 31. In order to meet that deadline, the Board of Public Utilities has set a Dec. 31 end to enrollment, spokesman Greg Reinert said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Joe Ponessa, who spent 25 years as a housing, indoor environment and health specialist at Rutgers Cooperative Extension, responded to a recent column about mold testing. He said much of what he knows about mold remediation comes from associating with some of the top mold people in the country. Concerning testing, he said the sentiment is generally against it: "If you can see and/or smell mold, it's there. " Testing provides little practical information, although there are some occasions when it is justified: lawsuit evidence, doctor's request, validation of the effectiveness of a large, expensive cleanup, etc. The most meaningful testing, air sampling, is expensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: I live in a 55-year-old stone and brick Colonial in Elkins Park. We are hoping to leave the house in five to 10 years. It is almost paid for, but based on recent sale prices, is not worth a great deal more than we paid for it - $200,000. I had an energy audit done, and contracted with the same firm to do some work to dry out the basement. They found mold, apparently the result of a broken plumbing line. They did testing - two spots in the basement, the ductwork and apparently of a very bad situation in the attic.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peco Energy Co. - and the Eagles! - are touting energy conservation. That's the idea behind the utility's latest promotion, which kicks off Saturday in South Philadelphia, though not at the Linc. Instead, courtesy of Peco, fans will be able to visit with one of today's favorite Eagles, tight end Brent Celek; two stars from yesteryear, Troy Vincent and Mike Quick; and the voice of the Eagles, Merrill Reese, from 1 to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Home Depot store, 1651 S. Columbus Blvd.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey grant program that funds energy-efficiency upgrades at no cost to local governments closes next week, and nearly a third of the 512 eligible municipalities and counties - including dozens of South Jersey towns - have not enrolled. The program provides up to $50,000 for upgrades to lighting, heating, and cooling systems in municipal and county buildings with no matching funds required. A ratepayer-funded clean-energy program pays 60 percent. The remainder is federal stimulus money that must be allocated by March 31. In order to meet that deadline, the Board of Public Utilities has set a Dec. 31 end to enrollment, spokesman Greg Reinert said.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
With so much focus on energy efficiency these days, it's hard to believe that dozens of South Jersey municipalities haven't applied for $20,000 in no-strings grants to conduct energy audits that could point to substantial savings. The grants, plus funding to implement energy efficiencies, are available through a federal stimulus program under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. With a deadline to apply of Dec. 31, it's good to see that the energy audits are being promoted by volunteers in the "Jersey Call to Service," a program of the Citizens' Campaign, which seeks to involve citizens in their communities.
NEWS
December 3, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
With an eye toward colder temperatures and energy efficiency, a colleague asked me recently about energy audits. I pointed her to http://www.pahomeenergy.com , which provides the names of firms that provide energy audits (you pay, of course), as well as lots of information about conservation. Even if you don't live in Pennsylvania, the information is useful. Still, make certain that the information is applicable to your state. Question: Every time you write about compact fluorescent lights, you don't mention the mercury-disposal problem.
NEWS
March 31, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the national level, the federal government has plenty of greenhouse-gas statistics. Experts can estimate how much methane or carbon dioxide is being released into the atmosphere by looking at the amount of oil being imported and the amount of coal being mined, among other factors. But locally, data often is lacking to assess the size of a town's carbon footprint. That could soon change. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has launched a pilot program in which communities will work on estimating how much they're polluting and then find a way to cut emissions.
LIVING
February 26, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: My husband and I want to get an energy audit of our home and are having difficulty locating a company. We live in Aston, Delaware County. Can you give me any ideas on how to locate an independent company that has no vested interest in selling doors, windows, or a new furnace? Answer: In Pennsylvania, you can start with www.pahomeenergy.com. There are public-utility and government sites in every state that offer step-by-step information on do-it-yourself home-energy audits, but it is probably wise to bring in a qualified professional to do the work.
NEWS
May 3, 2009 | By Robyn Blumner
Another Earth Day has come and gone, and I'm still stuck windmill-deep in what is truly a modern dilemma. I want to be more energy-efficient and reduce my Bozo-sized carbon footprint. I want to save money on my energy bill each month, which has gotten so big that I segregate it along with my 401(k) statement, waiting for a moment of intestinal strength to take a peek. But I'm frozen with indecision over what kind of green technology to invest in that will not become an obsolete dinosaur or object of derision by the time I'm through paying for it. This quandary reminds me of that Sophie's Choice of the early 1980s: Beta or VHS. Choose wrong and the world will leave you behind.
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