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NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Friends, we've been going about being Pennsylvanians all wrong. Here we thought the government's mission was to energetically serve us when, in actuality, it exists to energetically serve energy companies. This week, Gov. Frackenstein, a man of few words yet so many business tax breaks, proposed giving Shell Oil $67 million in annual tax credits to build a petrochemical refinery, including a "cracker" facility that converts natural gas - we have a bit - into ethane for plastics.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2010 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If there is such a thing as a typical small-town law practice, then Les Greevy's could serve as the template. Or at least it might have a few years ago. Greevy, 66, has been practicing law in Williamsport in the state's northern tier for more than 40 years, just as his father and grandfather had before him. His practice traditionally centered on representing municipal governments, insurance companies, and individual clients seeking advice...
NEWS
June 24, 1994 | By Daniel LeDuc and Michael Raphael, FOR THE INQUIRER
A prominent Ocean County rabbi, whose political clout extends from the town hall in Lakewood to the statehouse in Trenton, was indicted yesterday on charges he peddled his influence to help the developers of a new energy plant. Rabbi Yisroel Schenkolewski, who is chairman of the Lakewood Board of Zoning Adjustment, was indicted along with a Lakewood lawyer, an energy company executive and three energy companies.. They were charged by an Ocean County grand jury with conspiracy, bribery and official misconduct in connection with the construction of a controversial co-generation facility in Lakewood.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynda and Steve Farrell moved into their stone house on the side of a hill, their "nook in the woods," in Downingtown one Friday in June 1992. The next morning, they woke up to a bulldozer in the grassy field of their front yard. "That was our first realization of what it was to have a pipeline on your land," Lynda Farrell, 63, said. When the couple went down their long, shared driveway, they learned the crew was there to look into a potential leak in one of the three natural gas pipelines that run under the field.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2006 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
With weather forecasters expecting an above-average hurricane season, government regulators and major players in the energy sector hope errors made last year during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita won't be repeated. Mistakes and mechanical failures coupled with the unprecedented back-to-back severe storms in August and September disrupted U.S. oil production and gasoline distribution and sent global oil prices soaring past $71 a barrel from about $58 a year earlier, and gasoline above $3 a gallon.
NEWS
September 12, 1996 | BY DAVID MAGNUS BOONIN
For years, I was among those reluctant to have the city sell PGW. But times have changed. The energy industry is rapidly becoming more competitive - providing new services and lower costs to its customers. PGW - shackled by too much debt, too much regulation and too few incentives to be efficient and innovative - cannot compete against the new wave of energy companies eager to serve this region. Here are a number of the compelling reasons to sell PGW now. First, PGW's value may never be higher.
NEWS
August 15, 2005
I CAN think of no more compelling example of the need for an effective, swiftly imposed national death penalty statute than the horrific incident in Kingston, Tenn., in which the gun-wielding wife of a violent criminal freed him by murdering a law enforcement officer in cold blood at her husband's direction. Capital punishment was tailor-made for individuals such as these animals: sub-humans who have demonstrated that they have sacrificed their right to live among civilized individuals, as they possess no heart, no soul, and no conscience, exhibiting a depraved indifference to human life.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Like much in the country today, the debate over Pennsylvania's shale-gas boom often seems hopelessly polarized - an endless and largely useless standoff between environmentalists who want the gas to stay in the ground and energy executives who think it's theirs to exploit unhindered. So only a cynic could fail to be encouraged by a new collaboration that brings environmental and energy interests together. The Center for Sustainable Shale Development debuted last month with the goal of setting standards for environmentally responsible extraction of shale fuels.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Heeding the call of the wild The U.S. House of Representatives took a historic vote last month, designating 1.6 million acres in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness and part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The Udall-Eisenhower Arctic Wilderness Act has been introduced in every Congress for nearly three decades and had never been voted on until Feb. 26. The act is named for two American visionaries: Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who set aside the core of the refuge in 1960, and former Democratic U.S. Rep. Morris Udall (D., Ariz)
NEWS
July 5, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Pipeline policy flawed A commentary about a U.S. House-approved energy bill meant to streamline regulatory approval of natural-gas pipelines suggested that the bureaucratic hoops faced by energy companies are effectively a "backdoor ban" on fossil-fuel production ("Energy bill to boost jobs," June 24). As a Philadelphian worried about the impact of fossil-fuel emissions on our environment, I support legislation that targets our nation's carbon consumption. A policy that places a steadily rising carbon fee on fossil fuels is a good place to start.
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NEWS
July 5, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Pipeline policy flawed A commentary about a U.S. House-approved energy bill meant to streamline regulatory approval of natural-gas pipelines suggested that the bureaucratic hoops faced by energy companies are effectively a "backdoor ban" on fossil-fuel production ("Energy bill to boost jobs," June 24). As a Philadelphian worried about the impact of fossil-fuel emissions on our environment, I support legislation that targets our nation's carbon consumption. A policy that places a steadily rising carbon fee on fossil fuels is a good place to start.
NEWS
March 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Heeding the call of the wild The U.S. House of Representatives took a historic vote last month, designating 1.6 million acres in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness and part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. The Udall-Eisenhower Arctic Wilderness Act has been introduced in every Congress for nearly three decades and had never been voted on until Feb. 26. The act is named for two American visionaries: Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who set aside the core of the refuge in 1960, and former Democratic U.S. Rep. Morris Udall (D., Ariz)
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynda and Steve Farrell moved into their stone house on the side of a hill, their "nook in the woods," in Downingtown one Friday in June 1992. The next morning, they woke up to a bulldozer in the grassy field of their front yard. "That was our first realization of what it was to have a pipeline on your land," Lynda Farrell, 63, said. When the couple went down their long, shared driveway, they learned the crew was there to look into a potential leak in one of the three natural gas pipelines that run under the field.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
This article originally misstated the number of jobs the oil and gas industry supports. It is 9.6 million. By Chris Faulkner America is in the midst of an energy renaissance that's transforming communities. Consider Karnes County, Texas. A few years ago, the community was plagued by poverty. Today, it's not uncommon for local residents to collect $70 million each month in royalties for allowing energy companies to drill on their land. The wealth has increased the county's tax base almost six-fold in two years.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
Like much in the country today, the debate over Pennsylvania's shale-gas boom often seems hopelessly polarized - an endless and largely useless standoff between environmentalists who want the gas to stay in the ground and energy executives who think it's theirs to exploit unhindered. So only a cynic could fail to be encouraged by a new collaboration that brings environmental and energy interests together. The Center for Sustainable Shale Development debuted last month with the goal of setting standards for environmentally responsible extraction of shale fuels.
NEWS
March 30, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Never leave anything unsaid is a lesson former Gov. Ed Rendell may have relearned the hard way this week. Two days ago, the usually loquacious Democrat had an op-ed piece published in the New York Daily News urging New York state to get over its fears and permit hydraulic fracturing - commonly known as fracking - to seek natural gas within its borders. In the piece, headlined "Why [Gov. Andrew] Cuomo Must Seize the Moment on Hydrofracking," Rendell listed the benefits of natural gas for the region's economic development as well as the nation's energy future.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A consortium of environmentalists, philanthropies, and energy companies that are frequently at odds over fossil-fuel development has created a certification program they say will hold shale-drilling companies to higher performance standards. Much as the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification program has become the gold standard for green buildings, the new Center for Sustainable Shale Development aspires to create a rigorous environmental seal of approval for companies developing the Marcellus Shale and other Appalachian formations.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2013 | By Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The S&P 500 kept its winning streak alive, but just barely. In a week of a couple big mergers, the Standard & Poor's 500 ended the week nearly two points higher, enough to give it a seventh straight week of gains. That's the longest stretch of advances in more than two years. The index lost 1.59 points to end at 1,519.79 Friday. For the week it held on to a gain of 1.86 points. Investors piled into stocks at the beginning of the year. The gains continued as investors were encouraged by signs that the housing and job markets are recovering.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - Is natural-gas drilling ruining the air, polluting water, and making people sick? The evidence is inconclusive, but a lack of serious funding is delaying efforts to resolve those questions and creating a vacuum that could lead to a crush of lawsuits, some experts say. A House committee in June turned down an Obama administration request to fund $4.25 million in research on how drilling may affect water quality. In the spring, Pennsylvania stripped $2 million of funding that called for a state health registry to track respiratory problems, skin conditions, stomach ailments, and other illnesses potentially related to gas drilling.
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