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Energy Drinks

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NEWS
October 24, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAGERSTOWN, MD. - The highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink has been cited in five deaths and one non-fatal heart attack, according to reports that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating. The reports claim that people had adverse reactions after they consumed Monster Energy Drink, which comes in 24-ounce cans and contains 240 milligrams of caffeine, or seven times the amount of the caffeine in a 12-ounce cola. Although the FDA is investigating the allegations, which date back to 2004, the agency said the reports don't necessarily prove that the drinks caused the deaths or injuries.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | Inquirer Staff and Wire Report
Some teens are calling caffeinated alcoholic beverages "roofies in a can" or a "blackout in a can" and now a New Jersey college is taking aim at them. Ramapo College has notified students that alcoholic energy drinks have been banned from the school's Bergen County campus in residences where drinking is allowed. The action came after 23 people were hospitalized for alcohol intoxication at the start of the fall semester. Police Chief James Batelli tells The Record newspaper of Hackensack college students aren't the only ones consuming the fruity drinks.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a 3:30 p.m. meeting for his group design project, a class from 6 to 9 p.m., and a mechanical-engineering exam the next day, Kevin Capps was feeling a workload crunch. So the skateboard-toting Drexel University senior stopped by a Wawa store Wednesday morning to pick up some energy in a can: 12 ounces of Red Bull. Was he risking his health? Almost certainly not, say health experts. The amount of caffeine in one 12-ounce can of the popular beverage - 114 milligrams - is about the same as that in a typical cup of coffee.
NEWS
August 22, 2007 | Daily News wire services
High blood pressure is now a big problem with U.S. kids CHICAGO - More than 1 million U.S. youngsters have undiagnosed high blood pressure, leaving them at risk for developing organ damage down the road, a study suggests. Calculating elevated blood pressure in children is trickier than in adults, and many doctors may not bother evaluating kids' numbers because they assume hypertension is an adult problem. Roughly 2 million U.S. youngsters have been estimated to have high blood pressure; the study suggests that three-quarters of them have it but don't know it. The numbers are driven at least partly by rising rates of obesity, which is strongly linked with high blood pressure.
FOOD
June 19, 2002 | By Carolyn Wyman FOR THE INQUIRER
Energy drinks such as Red Bull and SoBe Adrenaline Rush are also energizing efforts to promote iced coffee. If college students are jolting themselves awake with carbonated drinks spiked with caffeine, why not cold coffee, too? That's the idea behind Starbucks' new DoubleShot espresso-in-a-can and Coca-Cola's revamped Planet Java line of nutrient- and caffeine-enhanced bottled coffees. Folgers' new Jakada line of chilled coffees features bright Afro-graphics and a creamy base for milk-to-coffee grads.
NEWS
April 26, 2010 | By John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years ago Shoshanna Goldin underwent treatment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for a brain tumor that was strangling her vestibular nerve, making walking difficult. The tumor was benign, but it took Goldin three years to recover. She had to learn to walk again. The tumor left behind another lasting effect: a burning desire to help others by unraveling medical mysteries. Goldin, 17, who lives in Allentown and is a junior at Moravian Academy, is one of two high school students in the area who pursued everyday health questions to the finals of the Young Epidemiology Scholars Competition, which ended Sunday in Washington.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal health authorities are investigating reports of 13 deaths possibly linked to so-called energy shots and cautioning consumers to talk to their doctors before they take them or other energy drinks. The Food and Drug Administration has received 92 reports over four years that cite illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths after consumption of a product marketed as 5-Hour Energy. The FDA has also received reports that cited the highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink in five deaths and one nonfatal heart attack.
NEWS
November 12, 2010 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
Saint Joseph's University confirms that a handful of students were hospitalized after drinking Four Loko, a fruit-flavored, caffeinated malt-liquor beverage. The drink has the same amount of liquor as three or more beers and as much caffeine as several cups of coffee, authorities say. "We're not talking about epidemic numbers," Cary Anderson, vice president of the Office of Student Life, said of the students taken to hospitals. He declined to give a specific number of students who are believed to have been sickened by the controversial drink, but said "we started seeing Four Loko come up as something that people had been drinking that got them to the point where they needed hospitalization.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2008 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What has Red Bull wrought? The popular energy drink and a host of liquid competitors, according to a food trends analyst, have led to this: People want a buzz from their food, too. If coffee's not your thing, get your caffeine in Morning Spark oatmeal, Sumseeds sunflower seeds, or Phoenix Fury potato chips. In Japan, where energy is in especially high demand, consumers can buy "Men's Soy Sauce Ramen Noodles," a dried pork soup spiked with caffeine. Marketers are also stretching "energy" to mean healthy, non-stimulant foods, such as berries or flaxseed, that supposedly give your body or brain a boost.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2008 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
What has Red Bull wrought? The popular energy drink and a host of liquid competitors, according to a food trends analyst, have led to this: People want a buzz from their food, too. If coffee's not your thing, get your caffeine in Morning Spark oatmeal, Sumseeds sunflower seeds, or Phoenix Fury potato chips. In Japan, where energy is in especially high demand, consumers can buy "Men's Soy Sauce Ramen Noodles," a dried pork soup spiked with caffeine. Marketers are also stretching "energy" to mean healthy, non-stimulant foods, such as berries or flaxseed, that supposedly give your body or brain a boost.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Winter's cruelest months A recent study has found that more fatal heart attacks and strokes occur in winter than at other times of the year After studying about 1.7 million death certificates filed between 2005 and 2008, cardiologists Bryan Schwartz and Robert A. Kloner found a 26 percent to 36 percent greater death rate from heart attacks in winter than in summer. The worst months are December, January, February, and early March. The doctors analyzed the cause of death for people in seven areas, including Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012
"The president brought up that he hadn't always had the best relationship with business, and he didn't think he deserved that, but he understood that's where things were and wanted it to be better. " - David M. Cote, CEO, Honeywell, after a meeting of business executives with President Obama at the White House. "Choices made by Jon Corzine during his tenure as chairman and CEO sealed MF Global's fate. " - Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R., Texas) on results of congressional oversight panel on the fall of MF Global.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Federal health authorities are investigating reports of 13 deaths possibly linked to so-called energy shots and cautioning consumers to talk to their doctors before they take them or other energy drinks. The Food and Drug Administration has received 92 reports over four years that cite illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths after consumption of a product marketed as 5-Hour Energy. The FDA has also received reports that cited the highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink in five deaths and one nonfatal heart attack.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a 3:30 p.m. meeting for his group design project, a class from 6 to 9 p.m., and a mechanical-engineering exam the next day, Kevin Capps was feeling a workload crunch. So the skateboard-toting Drexel University senior stopped by a Wawa store Wednesday morning to pick up some energy in a can: 12 ounces of Red Bull. Was he risking his health? Almost certainly not, say health experts. The amount of caffeine in one 12-ounce can of the popular beverage - 114 milligrams - is about the same as that in a typical cup of coffee.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HAGERSTOWN, MD. - The highly caffeinated Monster Energy Drink has been cited in five deaths and one non-fatal heart attack, according to reports that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is investigating. The reports claim that people had adverse reactions after they consumed Monster Energy Drink, which comes in 24-ounce cans and contains 240 milligrams of caffeine, or seven times the amount of the caffeine in a 12-ounce cola. Although the FDA is investigating the allegations, which date back to 2004, the agency said the reports don't necessarily prove that the drinks caused the deaths or injuries.
SPORTS
September 25, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
JOSH HAMILTON was back in the lineup Monday against the visting Oakland Athletics after missing the last five games because of blurred vision and balance issues. In the Texas Rangers' 5-4 win, Hamilton played the part of Triple Crown spoiler - for a night, at least - hitting his 43rd homer of the season in the fifth inning to move ahead of Miguel Cabrera in the AL home run lead. Cabrera, the Tigers slugger, is bidding to become the first AL Triple Crown winner since Carl Yastrzemski in 1967.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a record 40,000 competitors set for Sunday's Blue Cross Broad Street Run, many may be looking for an energy boost. They may want to consider some advice from the International Marathon Medical Directors Association: Don't load up on caffeine. The group's recommendation — to consume no more than 200 mg of caffeine the morning of a race of 10K or more — is not widely known, even among endurance athletes. The guidance is aimed at an uncommon but disturbing phenomenon: young, experienced, seemingly healthy runners dropping dead near the finish line for reasons that are never explained.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | By Bill Ward, (MINNEAPOLIS) STAR TRIBUNE
Why are 70 million Americans having trouble getting a good night's sleep? Let us count the ways: We are over-caffeinated (coffee, soft drinks, energy drinks, snacks) and over-medicated (prescription and over-the-counter drugs, including alcohol), wreaking havoc with slumber patterns. We are over-wired (video games, Web browsing, social media, texting) and overstressed (money, work, relationships, overloaded schedules), making us too restless to doze off when we should. We are overworked (longer hours, night shifts incompatible with our biological clocks)
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook and Ashley Nguyen, Inquirer Staff Writers
The founder of I'm Shmacked, the enterprise that posted a controversial video online of Lower Merion teens partying, says he wants to "hash it out" on live TV with school district officials who objected to the post. Arya Toufanian, 19, of Potomac, Md., defended his business Thursday, saying he "was not at all upset about Lower Merion complaining. " School spokesman Doug Young declined to be drawn into any debate with Toufanian. "Our focus is on the safety and well-being of our students," Young said, "and that's the bottom line.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The founder of I'm Shmacked, the firm that posted video of local teens drinking and partying online, says he wants to "hash it out" on live TV with Lower Merion School District officials who objected to the post. Arya Toufanian, 19, of Potomac, Md., defended his business today, saying he "was not at all upset about Lower Merion complaining. " Asked to comment on the situation, Lower Merion schools spokesman Doug Young declined to be drawn into a debate with Toufanian. "Our focus is on the safety and well-being of our students, and that's the bottom line," Young said.
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