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Energy Efficiency

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NEWS
August 29, 1995 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Consumer and environmental groups lashed out yesterday at a major New Jersey electric company that seeks to shrink its energy-conservation programs. But the utility says that, with a glut of cheap energy now available, such conservation programs are no longer cost-effective. Jersey Central Power and Light's proposal could foreshadow similar moves by other utilities in the region also seeking to capitalize on the lure of cheap energy from other parts of the country. Consumers would no longer receive discounts for limiting their use of appliances at peak energy times if the state Board of Public Utilities, which plans to decide on the plan by year's end, approves JCP&L's proposal.
NEWS
July 14, 2009 | By Katrina Schwartz
In their continuing efforts to balance the state budget, the governor and lawmakers are considering eliminating a program designed to help Pennsylvanians make their homes more energy-efficient. Given the need to help citizens through a difficult economy while also addressing climate change, the program should not be facing such a threat. The Keystone Home Energy Loan Program provides the only low-interest loans available to homeowners looking to reduce their monthly utility bills and shrink their carbon footprints.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Delaware and Maryland were already in. El Paso, Orlando, San Diego, and Spokane were in. On Tuesday, Mayor Nutter, flanked by federal energy and environmental officials, announced that Philadelphia also was joining a U.S. better-buildings challenge and launched an energy race among the city's biggest buildings. As in weight reduction, the biggest losers win. The challenge is to reduce energy use 5 percent by Sept. 30, 2015. But building operators are encouraged to do more.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
John Downey, proprietor of the Silvercrest retirement home in Taunton, Mass., was visiting a friend's house in June. "What's that funny-looking light bulb?" he asked. He was told that it was a new kind of small, energy-efficient fluorescent lamp that uses 18 watts of electricity but puts out as much light as a 75-watt bulb and lasts 13 times longer, up to 10,000 hours. The Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant rents the compact "smartlights," which screw into ordinary sockets, to its customers for 20 cents a month.
NEWS
July 24, 2014
D OUG BLOOM, 56, of Flourtown, is CEO of RealWinWin, a company that makes energy efficiency economically viable for clients who own, operate or manage more than 1 billion square feet of commercial space. The company finds, collects and creates rebates to make energy-related projects more cost-effective. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for RealWinWin? A: The company was founded in 2001 to build an ASP [application service provider] in the landlord-tenant, building and energy-efficiency spaces.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
How many conservatives does it take to screw in a new lightbulb? More than if it were liberals. A new study out of the University of Pennsylvania finds that people who are more politically conservative are less in favor of investing in energy-efficiency technology. It turns out that they're likely to be put off by the environmental messaging. Which is ubiquitous. Energy efficiency has long been touted as a way to stall climate change. The federal government's Energy Star website promotes energy-efficient products by saying they will "save energy and fight climate change.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once Marcelo J. Rouco decided on Philadelphia as the location for the North American headquarters of his Australian energy-efficiency firm, Ecosave Inc., he went all in. Last June, he paid $4.2 million for a small engineering firm in Bristol, DVL Automation, as a beachhead for his North American expansion. He also bought a Center City house and relocated his wife and two children from Down Under. "Australia is a great place, but a smaller market, only 21 million people," said Rouco, 44. "So I expect the North American office to generate a lot more revenue than the Australian office.
REAL_ESTATE
March 19, 1989 | By H. Jane Lehman, Special to The Inquirer
Congress is eyeing a plan to enable home buyers and renters to compare the energy efficiency of homes in an attempt to cut down on the use of fossil fuels that have been blamed for the greenhouse effect. But housing-industry officials say that the proposed numerical rating system would unnecessarily complicate the home-buying process - because utility usage information is readily available - and would raise the cost of buying or renting a home. The building labeling plan is part of broader legislation introduced in February by Sen. Timothy Wirth (D., Colo.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Jeanne M. Fox
Energy policy has a profound impact on nearly everything Americans hold important. The right policy can mean job creation, a thriving economy fueled by affordable energy and technological innovation, a cleaner environment, increased security, and a foreign policy liberated from energy dependence. Today, Americans are coping with the repercussions of the wrong national energy policy. Families struggle to pay the rising costs of heating their homes and fueling their cars. Businesses absorb the economic impact of poor electric reliability.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The benefits of energy efficiency are hitting home. Homes built in the last decade, despite being 30 percent larger than older dwellings, consume only 2 percent more energy on average, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The typical home built after 1999 consumed 21 percent less energy for space heating than older homes, according to EIA's most recent Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Improvements in the efficiency of heating equipment and better-insulated building shells accounted for much of the reduction, said James "Chip" Berry, manager of the residential survey, outlined Thursday in an EIA online newsletter.
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REAL_ESTATE
October 20, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you work as a builder, what better way to experiment with new environmentally friendly techniques and materials than on your own house. That's what Matthew Seip and his wife, Sue, did at their Perkiomenville home, nestled on an acre or so of quiet land close to Green Lane Park and the Perkiomen Trail. For the Seips, buying and rebuilding the three-story, 1,500-square-foot house was an expression of their philosophy that less is more. They have a garden and raise chickens. Through composting, they teach their three children, Emmett, Elisabeth, and Nathan, about recycling.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
IT'S A RACE in reverse, you might say. Mayor Nutter yesterday announced the launch of a citywide competition among big buildings to show the lowest energy costs, with a national prize awaiting the winners after a year. The Energy Reduction Race will tally the energy bills of the participating commercial skyscrapers in the city and will be judged by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. The "race" ends Sept. 30, 2015, when each of three top-performing buildings will be awarded $5,000.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Delaware and Maryland were already in. El Paso, Orlando, San Diego, and Spokane were in. On Tuesday, Mayor Nutter, flanked by federal energy and environmental officials, announced that Philadelphia also was joining a U.S. better-buildings challenge and launched an energy race among the city's biggest buildings. As in weight reduction, the biggest losers win. The challenge is to reduce energy use 5 percent by Sept. 30, 2015. But building operators are encouraged to do more.
NEWS
July 24, 2014
D OUG BLOOM, 56, of Flourtown, is CEO of RealWinWin, a company that makes energy efficiency economically viable for clients who own, operate or manage more than 1 billion square feet of commercial space. The company finds, collects and creates rebates to make energy-related projects more cost-effective. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for RealWinWin? A: The company was founded in 2001 to build an ASP [application service provider] in the landlord-tenant, building and energy-efficiency spaces.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what was, by all accounts, their first public appearance together since winning their parties' nominations in the May 20 primary election, Republican Gov. Corbett and Democratic challenger Tom Wolf outlined their competing environmental stances Wednesday night at the annual dinner meeting of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council. Both spoke of a need for balance - that environmental protection and economic development are not mutually exclusive. But they differed in how to get there - most notably, but not surprisingly, on whether there should be an extraction tax on natural gas development in the state's rich Marcellus Shale formation.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed federal rule to reduce carbon pollution from existing power plants - a signature initiative for the Obama administration - would not only address climate change but protect public health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said in announcing it Monday. But how Pennsylvania and New Jersey would meet that mandate is still very much up in the air. By 2030, the nation's power sector would, on average, have to reduce carbon dioxide emissions 30 percent below 2005 levels.
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Tom Wolf's campaign for governor has apologized and fired a consultant after acknowledging the aide lifted passages from a Wisconsin energy company's reports and reprinted them as part of Wolf's policy on energy efficiency. "I have directed the staff to make sure nothing like this ever happens again, and have asked for a new process to be put in place to ensure it does not," Wolf said in a statement. U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, one of his opponents in the Democratic primary, pointed out the "troubling plagiarism" Thursday, saying the episode raised doubts about the front-runner.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission will hold a hearing May 5 at Drexel University on the use of combined heat and power (CHP), a high-efficiency method of generating electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel source. CHP systems, which are used by businesses like hotels, universities and hospitals, generate about 2,638 megawatts or 7.2 percent of Pennsylvania's total electricity. The PUC says the technical potential for additional systems could quadruple that production.
REAL_ESTATE
April 13, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Whether they're looking at newly built or previously owned houses, all buyers have lengthy wish-lists. When choosing new, they have a virtually empty canvas on which to draw their dream homes, especially if money is no object. These days, however, it is an issue, even for higher-end buyers, said Carl Becht, vice president of sales for Vaughan & Sautter Builders in Wayne. "They are very cost-conscious these days and might not be as willing to go overboard" as they were before the economic downturn, Becht said.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Hall has a reputation as a prodigious producer of hot air. But the towering seat of government at Broad and Market Streets is not Philadelphia's biggest greenhouse-gas emitter. The Philadelphia Museum of Art and Perelman Building ranked as city government's top energy consumer, according to a new list compiled by the Mayor's Office of Sustainability. City Hall ranked No. 6. Twenty buildings in three sectors - offices and courts, prisons, and museums - consumed more than 60 percent of the energy used by 259 city buildings analyzed in the report.
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