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NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's new governor pitched the state to the energy industry Tuesday morning during a conference at the Convention Center. "We should be fertile ground for you to come and do your business," Gov. Wolf said in a speech at Globalcon, an event for the energy industry hosted by the Association of Energy Engineers. Pennsylvania will be increasingly friendly to energy-efficient businesses under his administration, Wolf said. He also touted his plan to reduce the corporate income tax. The tax currently is 9.99 percent; Wolf said he wants it reduced to 5.99 percent by next year.
NEWS
September 12, 1996 | BY DAVID MAGNUS BOONIN
For years, I was among those reluctant to have the city sell PGW. But times have changed. The energy industry is rapidly becoming more competitive - providing new services and lower costs to its customers. PGW - shackled by too much debt, too much regulation and too few incentives to be efficient and innovative - cannot compete against the new wave of energy companies eager to serve this region. Here are a number of the compelling reasons to sell PGW now. First, PGW's value may never be higher.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's one-year moratorium on the controversial technique of natural-gas extraction known as fracking expired Thursday with little fanfare. While energy industry officials maintain that the natural-gas deposits in the state's northwest corner are too deep and uncertain to make hydraulic fracturing economically viable in the near term, environmentalists have lobbied heavily for continuing the ban as protection against the type of development seen across the Marcellus Shale formation in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The White House said yesterday that the Bush administration did not give special treatment to the energy industry last year while shaping a national energy policy. Disclosures in newly released documents showed more than a dozen meetings between Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham and industry leaders, and no apparent contacts between Abraham and environmentalists or consumer groups. The documents, released Monday on the orders of federal courts, have provoked an uproar, because thousands of pages were withheld and many others were heavily edited.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
By Andy Swiger Over the next three years, Philadelphia will play a special role in getting America's economy moving again. The city's historic shipyard will be home to the construction of two enormous tankers - 115,000-ton, state-of-the-art vessels designed for the safe and efficient transportation of crude oil. This will be no small engineering feat and no small investment. ExxonMobil is spending $400 million on the tankers' construction. For the city, this will mean more than a thousand jobs and millions of dollars in revenue.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | by Michael Busler
When the state government decided to deregulate the energy industry, lofty promises were made to the public. We were told that utility rates would increase at a slower pace than in the past without any decline in service. The skeptical public wondered how this could be accomplished. Will it work? Years ago, when the energy industry was being commercialized, the government wanted to ensure that the public would pay the lowest possible price for all types of energy. They reasoned that by allowing only one company to provide electricity, gas and other utilities, only one set of wires or gas lines would have to be installed.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
Oil prices are a double-edged sword for the energy industry. High prices slow demand, but they still can boost profits, though the equation looks different to a refiner such as Philadelphia's Sunoco Inc. than to oil-rich competitors. "They like to say that they don't widen their margins, but when you've got a $100 barrel of oil and your margin is 10 percent, you're making $10. When it's $50, you're making $5," said Joel Naroff, chief economist for TD Bank N.A. Naroff said the whole energy sector faced lingering effects from this year's spike in oil prices above $147 a barrel, even though some analysts expect prices to stay in the $40 to $50 range next year.
NEWS
August 6, 2001
It's payback time on Capitol Hill. The energy bill passed by the House Thursday night isn't about strengthening America's strategic energy position. It's about something much simpler - a gigantic giveaway to the energy industry. In an analysis released by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D., Calif.) called "Hitting the Jackpot," the rewards for industry are outlined. The . . . cumulative value of the 2000 election campaign contributions by the coal, oil and gas, nuclear and utility industries - the lion's share of which went to the GOP - was $69.5 million; the total value of the tax breaks and subsidies is $36.4 billion.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans today will propose to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, to give the energy industry $21 billion in subsidies to spur production, and to allow drivers who use alternative fuels to zip solo down carpool lanes. In what is considered a preview of the Bush administration's still-developing national power plan, Sen. Frank Murkowski (R., Alaska) will introduce a bill proposing dramatic changes in U.S. energy policy, mainly by putting heavy emphasis on increasing supplies.
NEWS
February 23, 2002 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The General Accounting Office, the investigative arm of Congress, sued Vice President Cheney yesterday in an unprecedented effort to obtain the names of energy-industry executives who helped the White House draft its energy policy. The Bush administration vowed to fight the suit by arguing that the GAO had overstepped its authority. White House officials said their stand was based on principle, not out of fear that disclosure would politically embarrass Cheney and President Bush.
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NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's new governor pitched the state to the energy industry Tuesday morning during a conference at the Convention Center. "We should be fertile ground for you to come and do your business," Gov. Wolf said in a speech at Globalcon, an event for the energy industry hosted by the Association of Energy Engineers. Pennsylvania will be increasingly friendly to energy-efficient businesses under his administration, Wolf said. He also touted his plan to reduce the corporate income tax. The tax currently is 9.99 percent; Wolf said he wants it reduced to 5.99 percent by next year.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why so slow? Pennsylvania is one of the states where fewer people are working than in 2007. This isn't quite new. Job growth here has been half the national average for the last 75 years, writes senior economist Mark Vitner and his team at Wells Fargo Securities L.L.C. , the investment arm of the Philadelphia area's dominant bank, in its yearly report reviewing the state's economy. Last year, Pennsylvania suffered layoffs at military contractors, steelmakers, drugmakers. Home prices went flat, and Philadelphia developers are building so many apartments, they are risking a glut - unless the city attracts "considerably more jobs and residents," according to Wells Fargo.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Thursday struck down provisions of the state's Oil and Gas Act that stripped municipalities of the power to determine where natural gas drilling activity could occur within their boundaries. The long-awaited decision is a blow to a 2012 law known as Act 13 that was promoted by Gov. Corbett and the Marcellus Shale natural gas industry as a means to create a uniform statewide standard for gas development. By a 4-2 vote, the court ruled that the zoning provisions in the law were unconstitutional, though the court disagreed on the grounds for striking down the law. "The bottom line is that the majority of the court agreed that Act 13 is unconstitutional, and that local governments can zone oil and gas drilling like they do other activities," said Jordan B. Yeager, a Doylestown environmental lawyer who argued the case on behalf of several municipalities.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's one-year moratorium on the controversial technique of natural-gas extraction known as fracking expired Thursday with little fanfare. While energy industry officials maintain that the natural-gas deposits in the state's northwest corner are too deep and uncertain to make hydraulic fracturing economically viable in the near term, environmentalists have lobbied heavily for continuing the ban as protection against the type of development seen across the Marcellus Shale formation in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By Mark Drajem, Bloomberg News
Before many Pennsylvania moviegoers settle in for Matt Damon's film about the fight over natural gas drilling, they will see a message from the energy industry offering "straightforward facts" about hydraulic fracturing. The unorthodox, on-screen pre-rebuttal of Promised Land , which opens nationwide Monday, is part of an industry campaign aimed at heading off criticism about the process known as fracking. Instead of direct attacks, which the industry used against the documentary Gasland, it is trying to paint Damon's movie as derivative, condescending, and cliched.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Attacks were acts of war The "sites" were U.S. embassies in Egypt and Libya ("2 U.S. sites are attacked; American reported slain," Wednesday). The dead are Americans - U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three members of his staff. These attacks are acts of war. The date was 9/11. Have we already forgotten that radical Islamists are at war with us? This story should have been on the front page, not A5. Tom Messmer, Blue Bell Government boosts to economy With unemployment stubbornly high, it's time for politicians to focus on what is working in today's economy: tailoring government policies to help specific industries thrive ("Markets shrug off lukewarm jobs data," Saturday)
NEWS
October 3, 2011
By Andy Swiger Over the next three years, Philadelphia will play a special role in getting America's economy moving again. The city's historic shipyard will be home to the construction of two enormous tankers - 115,000-ton, state-of-the-art vessels designed for the safe and efficient transportation of crude oil. This will be no small engineering feat and no small investment. ExxonMobil is spending $400 million on the tankers' construction. For the city, this will mean more than a thousand jobs and millions of dollars in revenue.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2011 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania solar-energy industry is collapsing under the weight of its own good fortune. Spurred by hundreds of millions of dollars in federal and state incentives, solar developers have built so many projects in recent years that they have created an oversupply of solar-energy credits, the market instruments that provide the developers with a critical income stream. The price of solar credits in the state has plummeted as much as 75 percent in the last year, dramatically shrinking the income-producing potential of new and existing solar projects.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A national leader came to Philadelphia this week and expended a lot of energy and rhetoric on the subject of renewable energy. Of course, I'm talking about Rhone Resch , president and chief executive officer of the Solar Energy Industries Association . He spoke at the PV America Conference 2011 at the Convention Center, which attracted photovoltaic-module manufacturers and solar-panel dealers from around the country to Philadelphia for...
NEWS
December 11, 2008
Oil prices are a double-edged sword for the energy industry. High prices slow demand, but they still can boost profits, though the equation looks different to a refiner such as Philadelphia's Sunoco Inc. than to oil-rich competitors. "They like to say that they don't widen their margins, but when you've got a $100 barrel of oil and your margin is 10 percent, you're making $10. When it's $50, you're making $5," said Joel Naroff, chief economist for TD Bank N.A. Naroff said the whole energy sector faced lingering effects from this year's spike in oil prices above $147 a barrel, even though some analysts expect prices to stay in the $40 to $50 range next year.
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