CollectionsEnergy Policy
IN THE NEWS

Energy Policy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
November 2, 2008 | By Joseph Hannan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though the presidential election is still two days away, environmental activist, author and lawyer Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has already developed an energy-policy charge for the winner. He presented his plan - "Energy Policy: The Next President's First Task" - at the Philadelphia Energy Summit yesterday at Holy Family University. The summit, hosted by the university and CBS Radio, featured vendors of environmentally friendly energy products and vehicles, panel discussions with industry experts, and Kennedy's keynote address.
NEWS
February 11, 2004
Two old pals took a duck-hunting trip to Louisiana last month, and now one of them is in the soup. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was the guest of Vice President Dick Cheney - and American taxpayers - aboard Air Force Two. They flew to a now-disclosed location: the bayou preserve of an oil-industry businessman. Once there, the veep and his distinguished legal pal set out to ruffle a few feathers. If only they knew . . . What normally might be a gossip-column blurb has turned into something far more weighty, since Cheney is named in a case pending at the Supreme Court.
NEWS
September 30, 2008 | By Kathleen A. McGinty, Former secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
The presidential candidates' energy proposals couldn't be more different, and Pennsylvanians should be especially concerned about how this particular debate turns out. Democrat Barack Obama has a plan to invest in clean, homegrown, renewable power that would create 5 million "green-collar" jobs, improve national security, and decrease our dependence on foreign oil. Republican John McCain wants to follow the current administration's lead, embracing...
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | By Lenore Skenazy
Thanks to 11,000 pages of documents recently and reluctantly released by the White House, we can see that Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham was rather selective in whom he spoke to concerning our country's energy policy. For instance, he met with 109 representatives of the energy industry - oil drillers, automakers, electricity brokers - and . . . hmmm . . . zero environmental groups. His spokeswoman claimed that the environmental community did not respond to their outreach. Outreach?
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau Charles Green of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
As U.S. troops wage war in part because the United States remains dependent on Persian Gulf oil, President Bush's long-promised overhaul of U.S. energy policy has yet to be presented. Despite pleadings from congressional Republicans, Bush will not propose a major energy program in his State of the Union message tonight, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday. Bush may not even mention his commitment to develop such a program. Even if he does, behind his rhetoric key energy policy decisions remain unmade - and key White House aides remain dead-set against pushing any truly ambitious energy program - according to sources inside the Bush administration, Congress and interest groups.
NEWS
November 14, 2005 | By Charles Krauthammer
Thank God for $3.50 gasoline. True, we had it for only a brief shining moment, and there is not much good to be said about the catastrophic hurricanes that caused it. But the price was already inexorably climbing as a result of 2.3 billion Chinese and Indians industrializing. Their increased demand is what brought us to the energy knife's edge and makes us so acutely vulnerable to supply disruptions. Yet the Senate is attacking the problem by hauling oil executives to hearings on "price gouging.
SPORTS
February 7, 1991 | By Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The energy drain legitimately startled Hersey Hawkins. He began to recognize the symptoms as the rhythm of his game started to fray at the edges. He felt it in his legs, which he needs under him for strength and balance as a jump shooter. He noticed it in his shoulders, as he felt the weight of the responsibility of carrying a heavier load during Charles Barkley's seven-game absence from the 76ers. "I'm learning that, as you get to the 40-, 45-, 50-game area of the season, you usually hit a wall, you feel a drain mentally and physically," The Hawk said last night after summoning a remarkable reserve of strength to score a career-high 39 points in a 108-100 victory over the Washington Bullets.
NEWS
February 2, 2006
You can't break an addiction simply by switching drug corners. It takes hard work and sacrifice. Often, it's uncomfortable, even painful. President Bush's call in Tuesday's State of the Union to replace more than 75 percent of U.S. oil imports from the Middle East by 2025 sounded like a worthy step toward energy independence. But it was just the usual drop in a barrel. "America is addicted to oil, which is often imported from unstable parts of the world," the President said.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Senate Republicans today will propose to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, to give the energy industry $21 billion in subsidies to spur production, and to allow drivers who use alternative fuels to zip solo down carpool lanes. In what is considered a preview of the Bush administration's still-developing national power plan, Sen. Frank Murkowski (R., Alaska) will introduce a bill proposing dramatic changes in U.S. energy policy, mainly by putting heavy emphasis on increasing supplies.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
John Quigley, who resigned in May as Gov. Wolf's environmental protection secretary, will join the University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy as a senior fellow on July 1. Quigley, who was forced to resign after he sent a private email encouraging environmental activists to lobby for gas-drilling regulations, "brings a wealth of policy expertise to Penn's students and faculty," Mark Alan Hughes, the Kleinman Center's director, said...
BUSINESS
October 2, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a call from coal producers to go slowly, Pennsylvania environmental regulators are steaming full speed ahead to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "We view the Clean Power Plan as presenting some major opportunities for Pennsylvania," John Quigley, secretary of the state Department of Environmental Protection, said Wednesday at a "listening session" the DEP held in Philadelphia to gather public comment on its emissions-reduction strategy.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Kleinman Center for Energy Policy announced Monday that it will bestow its inaugural $25,000 Carnot Prize on Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. Yergin, vice chairman of the research firm IHS, will receive the prize Oct. 12 at the official opening of the center's new space in Penn's Fisher Fine Arts Library. The prize recognizes "distinguished contributions to energy policy. " The Kleinman Center, which is associated with Penn's School of Design, was established last year.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Thursday will travel to Canada, where he is expected to discuss energy policy, a topic that could become part of a 2016 presidential platform. The trade mission, which begins Thursday in Calgary, Alberta, and ends Friday with stops in Ottawa and Toronto, Ontario, marks Christie's second foreign trip in three months as he considers a run for president. He led a New Jersey delegation to Mexico in September, where he also talked energy, an issue with foreign and domestic dimensions.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania has received a $10 million donation to create a center that aspires to develop new energy policy by reframing the relationship between research and practice. The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy will be named for donor Scott Kleinman and his wife, Wendy. He is a Wall Street private-equity manager and 1994 Penn alum. It will be directed by Mark Alan Hughes, a professor of practice at Penn's School of Design. Hughes was the city's first director of sustainability and is a former adviser to Mayor Nutter.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON With little fanfare, Gov. Christie has named Dianne Solomon of Haddonfield president of the Board of Public Utilities, the state agency charged with approving rates for gas, electricity, cable, and water companies, and implementing state energy policy. A paralegal with close political ties to Christie, Solomon is the wife of Superior Court Judge Lee A. Solomon, who served as BPU president from 2010 to 2012. She succeeds Robert M. Hanna, who was confirmed this week as a judge of the Superior Court.
NEWS
November 15, 2012
By Jennifer Rubin There will be plenty of fights in the next Congress, but here are five areas where there could be collaboration: K-12 reform: After years of falling test scores, it should be clear that what we're doing isn't working. Compromise on revamping No Child Left Behind should allow block grants, greater state control, charter schools, and school-choice experiments (some of which Mitt Romney cited on the trail). If Democrats want to subsidize more teachers, trade-offs can be made.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
Romney out of touch With the recent firestorm over Hillary Rosen's comments regarding Ann Romney's choice to be a stay-at-home mom, I am stunned that the Mitt Romney camp completely missed the bigger issue surrounding working mothers: Many of them work not out of choice, but out of necessity ("Ann Romney fires back at never-worked charge," Thursday). I'm sure there are countless mothers who would love to be married to a wealthy executive so they can stay at home and raise their children.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Larry Margasak, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sen. David Vitter undermined public trust when he blocked a raise for Interior Secretary Ken Salazar unless he issued more deep-water exploratory drilling permits in the Gulf of Mexico after the BP oil spill, the Senate ethics committee said in a letter released Friday. The committee called the Louisiana Republican's actions unprecedented but spared him charges of rules violations. In a statement Friday, Vitter said that the committee had validated his action by dismissing the complaint and that he was glad he had "killed Ken Salazar's salary increase - he has completely failed us on energy policy.
NEWS
March 26, 2012
By Llewellyn King When the Obama administration seeks to explain its oil policy, it changes the subject mid-sentence. The most frequent practitioner of this verbal contortion is the president's press secretary, Jay Carney. It is as though he's a magician who has promised to pull a live rabbit from his top hat. This conjurer stands before his audience, recites some incantations and, poof, retrieves not a live rabbit, but a dead chicken. Carney, like others in the administration, starts talking about oil and switches to talking about "alternatives.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|