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November 10, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The magnitude of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks will force America's utility regulators to pay heightened attention to national energy and water security when they meet for their annual convention starting today at the Philadelphia Marriott. The five-day gathering, sponsored by the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, will dedicate several sessions to what members from across the country should do to ensure the safety of their states' energy supplies and networks, Charles Gray, the association's executive director, said.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
With gas prices rising as war looms, talk of "energy security" intensifies in Washington. This week, the Senate, for the umpteenth time, will discuss whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Once again, enormous energy will be expended on debating a false equation. Expanding domestic drilling will not relieve America's dependence on foreign oil. It will barely make a dent. Congress and the Bush administration should abandon their ridiculous obsession with this frozen strip of Alaskan tundra.
NEWS
May 19, 2010
Your editorial "Oil spill is a warning" on Friday recognizes the continued need for increased domestic oil and natural gas and urges Congress and the industry to step up efforts to make certain offshore drilling is as safe as possible. We are doing just that. Working closely with the Department of the Interior, the industry quickly assembled two task forces of experts within days of the Deepwater Horizon incident to address issues related to offshore equipment and operating practices.
NEWS
April 15, 2002
I AM WRITING in response to letters that support drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and clarify a few common misconceptions. Myth: Finding more oil is the only way to solve America's long-term needs. Truth: Increasing fuel-economy standards to an average 39 mpg over the next decade would save 51 billion barrels of oil over the next 50 years - more than 15 times the likely yield from the refuge. Myth: Only a small portion of the refuge would be affected by drilling.
NEWS
November 20, 2010
The editorial "Buying good publicity" (Saturday) states that, "The greatest safety concerns from Marcellus Shale drilling stem from the impact on drinking water by the use of a water-and-chemical mix to break through to gas formations thousands of feet underground. " However, your readers should understand that fracturing fluids are 99.5 percent water and sand, with a fraction of additives used to reduce friction in the well bore and to kill bacteria (all components are listed on the state Department of Environmental Protection's website)
NEWS
July 5, 2013
By Mike Fitzpatrick Independence has a special place in the American lexicon. It conveys all the things that make us Americans: Freedom from tyranny, liberty, equality, and rule of the people. Independence, and the struggle for it, have been part of our heritage since that original fight 237 years ago - right up to today's struggle for energy independence. The natural resources that bless our nation not only ensure our prosperity. They also guarantee that our freedoms are set on our terms, not through demands of dictatorships that use their natural resources as pawns, instead of as tools for progress.
NEWS
June 15, 2002
Abortion training for docs Thank you so much for including Michelle Malkin in your newspaper. Her column, "Forcing Doctors to Kill" (June 10), illustrates the reality of abortion. Organizations like NARAL and NOW (and don't forget Planned Parenthood) would lose millions of dollars if the abortion industry were to fizzle out. Can abortion lobbyists dictate how doctors are to be trained? Do abortionists, abortion-rights activists and politicians who defend murder-for-hire have more rights than the rest of us who object to legalized death?
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Daphne Wysham
A golden opportunity is bubbling up beneath that undersea volcano of oil spewing thousands of gallons per day into the Gulf of Mexico. We have a chance to truly move our country, as BP says in its ad campaigns, "beyond petroleum. " Despite the spill's devastation, President Obama continues to claim that we must push forward with more offshore drilling - albeit with stronger safeguards - if we want to increase our energy security. I disagree. We wouldn't ever be secure, even if we drilled every well off our nation's coasts.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | By Elihu Bergman
Press and television coverage of the U.S. Navy on the Persian Gulf dramatizes the dangers of increasing U.S. involvement in the area. One shudders at the prospect of a U.S. vessel striking a floating mine. What would we do about it? How would other countries respond? Oil is not the principal reason we are there, but it is one of them. But oil could become increasingly important as we require more oil from the gulf, which is happening now. During 1986 U.S. oil imports from the gulf doubled over the previous year to about 7 percent of America's total consumption.
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NEWS
November 20, 2013
Gas-powered revival In a recent commentary about our region's potential to become a global energy hub, thankfully, the question the authors raise - how to square the economic opportunity with environmental challenges - is easily answered ("Revive Phila. energy hub," Nov. 13). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently found that greenhouse gas emissions are plummeting. They attribute this stark air-quality improvement to the expanded use of clean-burning, domestic natural gas. Additionally, a recent Environmental Defense Fund study highlighted that our industry's widespread use of technology is reducing methane emissions by an astounding 99 percent.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
By Mike Fitzpatrick Independence has a special place in the American lexicon. It conveys all the things that make us Americans: Freedom from tyranny, liberty, equality, and rule of the people. Independence, and the struggle for it, have been part of our heritage since that original fight 237 years ago - right up to today's struggle for energy independence. The natural resources that bless our nation not only ensure our prosperity. They also guarantee that our freedoms are set on our terms, not through demands of dictatorships that use their natural resources as pawns, instead of as tools for progress.
NEWS
November 20, 2010
The editorial "Buying good publicity" (Saturday) states that, "The greatest safety concerns from Marcellus Shale drilling stem from the impact on drinking water by the use of a water-and-chemical mix to break through to gas formations thousands of feet underground. " However, your readers should understand that fracturing fluids are 99.5 percent water and sand, with a fraction of additives used to reduce friction in the well bore and to kill bacteria (all components are listed on the state Department of Environmental Protection's website)
NEWS
May 19, 2010
Your editorial "Oil spill is a warning" on Friday recognizes the continued need for increased domestic oil and natural gas and urges Congress and the industry to step up efforts to make certain offshore drilling is as safe as possible. We are doing just that. Working closely with the Department of the Interior, the industry quickly assembled two task forces of experts within days of the Deepwater Horizon incident to address issues related to offshore equipment and operating practices.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Daphne Wysham
A golden opportunity is bubbling up beneath that undersea volcano of oil spewing thousands of gallons per day into the Gulf of Mexico. We have a chance to truly move our country, as BP says in its ad campaigns, "beyond petroleum. " Despite the spill's devastation, President Obama continues to claim that we must push forward with more offshore drilling - albeit with stronger safeguards - if we want to increase our energy security. I disagree. We wouldn't ever be secure, even if we drilled every well off our nation's coasts.
NEWS
October 26, 2004
To help voters in our closely contested region make an informed choice in this critical 2004 presidential election, The Inquirer Editorial Board offers a series of editorials documenting its reasons for endorsing John F. Kerry. A rebutting essay from a supporter of President George W. Bush appears on the facing Commentary Page. To read previous editorials and rebuttal essays, please go to http://go.philly.com/21reasons. Tomorrow's topic: Fiscal issues. Americans are discovering - to their dismay - that cheap oil isn't a birthright.
NEWS
November 18, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein and Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The House of Representatives is expected to vote today on a $95 billion comprehensive energy-policy bill crafted by Republican leaders that contains tens of billions of dollars of tax cuts and other benefits for the oil, gas, coal, ethanol and nuclear industries. Independent watchdogs say the legislation includes $72 billion in spending and $23 billion in tax cuts. The Republican energy plan would try to boost domestic oil, gas, coal and nuclear production with financial incentives to energy companies, but it lacks meaningful conservation measures, independent experts say. A House-Senate conference committee passed the bill last night as Democrats failed to win changes.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
With gas prices rising as war looms, talk of "energy security" intensifies in Washington. This week, the Senate, for the umpteenth time, will discuss whether to drill for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Once again, enormous energy will be expended on debating a false equation. Expanding domestic drilling will not relieve America's dependence on foreign oil. It will barely make a dent. Congress and the Bush administration should abandon their ridiculous obsession with this frozen strip of Alaskan tundra.
NEWS
September 9, 2002 | By Tom Avril and Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John Rigolizzo Jr. was making too little money selling feed corn to chicken farmers, with the price per bushel dropping by half during the last decade, so he has been growing wheat and other crops in recent years on his Camden County farm. Now he wants to switch back to corn. The reason? His corn could soon be fuel for a different kind of beast: automobiles. A group of investors wants to build a plant in South Jersey that would convert corn into ethanol, a type of alcohol that is added to gasoline to reduce air pollution.
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