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BUSINESS
October 15, 2004 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania messed with Texas, and won. Specifically, Kathleen A. McGinty, secretary of environmental protection, engineered an economic coup, winning a Spanish company's agreement last month to set up a wind turbine blade factory in the state and its U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia. Gamesa Corp. Tecnologica S.A.'s move could bring 1,000 jobs and an initial $25 million in investment to the state. Texas had been a leading contender. Though wind-generating capacity is only about 6,000 megawatts in the United States, less than 1 percent of the nation's electricity generation, wind power's attraction is growing as governments look to increase their use of clean alternative energy sources.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
Along Route 10 in Sadsbury, a 40-foot wind turbine towers silently over a driveway basketball goal. The 2-kilowatt wind-power generator stands now, according to owner Matthew Patzek, as a monument to America's first energy crisis. When it broke down about 18 months ago, Patzek learned that parts were unavailable. The manufacturer had gone out of business. Wind power, all but abandoned in the Philadelphia area, was only one of several fledgling energy technologies tapped in response to the 1970s oil crunch.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | BY SHEILA BALLEN and ELIZABETH B. THOMPSON
Late last month, a time of year when most people are focused on their own energy budgets and keeping warm, President Clinton will announce his federal energy budget for fiscal year 1995. This is a perfect opportunity for the president to dramatically shift federal energy research dollars from polluting sources of energy such as nuclear power, coal and oil, toward energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy sources. For most Americans, keeping warm in winter and using energy for all other purposes means depending on fossil fuels and nuclear power.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | By Glenn R. Schleede
The national energy policy announced by President Bush takes an important step toward reality by recognizing, implicitly or explicitly, that: This country has become much more efficient in its use of energy but is becoming increasingly dependent on electricity. While overall energy demand has grown little (only 30 percent since 1973), electricity demand has doubled during the same period. About 98 percent of the nation's electricity is produced from five energy sources: coal (51 percent)
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant next Wednesday to highlight the administration's policy of diversifying the nation's energy sources and reducing reliance on imported oil, a White House official said Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers about building a clean-energy future for the 21st century. Gamesa employs about 300 people at the facility, built on the site of a former U.S. Steel factory, and manufactures turbines used in the generation of wind-powered electricity.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
As snow blanketed the region Friday afternoon, it seemed appropriate for Akiba Hebrew Academy to be holding a seventh-grade science fair titled "Problems in the Environment. " While the snow created environmental hazards on the streets of Lower Merion, students inside were focusing on the harmful effects of pollution on the earth's oceans, land and atmosphere. "I think that all grades should do this," seventh-grader Naomi Taubman said as she looked at a demonstration of how radon seeps into a house.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant Wednesday to tout his plans to cut the nation's use of imported oil by one-third over the next decade while diversifying its energy sources, White House officials announced Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers; the event is by invitation. Amid rising gasoline prices caused by turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa, Obama has put a renewed emphasis over the last week on the need for energy independence.
NEWS
July 8, 2005
A renewable energy standard would help Pa. Regarding the Inquirer's July Fourth editorial on the misguided energy bill passed last week by the U.S. Senate, I wanted to highlight how Pennsylvania's senators voted on perhaps the most laudable piece of the bill, a renewable energy standard ("Needed: Some visionary additives"). This standard, which would require that the nation's utilities generate 10 percent of their electricity from clean, renewable energy sources by 2020, would help provide a boost in Pennsylvania for clean energy sources such as wind and solar power.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a winter highway breakdown or a natural disaster, there are smartphone applications that can help you cope. Take a look at these before another storm hits and as winter looms. The FEMA application from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, free for Android and Apple, offers access to the FEMA blog, which this week has updates on the nor'easter and on Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. There are also links for applying for FEMA assistance, maps and directions to FEMA facilities including shelters, instructions for volunteering to help, and a lot of guidelines for coping in and after a disaster.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012
For a winter highway breakdown or a natural disaster, there are smartphone applications that can help you cope. Take a look at these before another storm hits and as winter looms. The FEMA application from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, free for Android and Apple, offers access to the FEMA blog, which this week has updates on the nor'easter and on Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. There are also links for applying for FEMA assistance, maps and directions to FEMA facilities including shelters, instructions for volunteering to help, and a lot of guidelines for coping in and after a disaster.
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NEWS
November 8, 2012 | Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a winter highway breakdown or a natural disaster, there are smartphone applications that can help you cope. Take a look at these before another storm hits and as winter looms. The FEMA application from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, free for Android and Apple, offers access to the FEMA blog, which this week has updates on the nor'easter and on Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. There are also links for applying for FEMA assistance, maps and directions to FEMA facilities including shelters, instructions for volunteering to help, and a lot of guidelines for coping in and after a disaster.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012
For a winter highway breakdown or a natural disaster, there are smartphone applications that can help you cope. Take a look at these before another storm hits and as winter looms. The FEMA application from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, free for Android and Apple, offers access to the FEMA blog, which this week has updates on the nor'easter and on Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. There are also links for applying for FEMA assistance, maps and directions to FEMA facilities including shelters, instructions for volunteering to help, and a lot of guidelines for coping in and after a disaster.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Attacks were acts of war The "sites" were U.S. embassies in Egypt and Libya ("2 U.S. sites are attacked; American reported slain," Wednesday). The dead are Americans - U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three members of his staff. These attacks are acts of war. The date was 9/11. Have we already forgotten that radical Islamists are at war with us? This story should have been on the front page, not A5. Tom Messmer, Blue Bell Government boosts to economy With unemployment stubbornly high, it's time for politicians to focus on what is working in today's economy: tailoring government policies to help specific industries thrive ("Markets shrug off lukewarm jobs data," Saturday)
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lot of energy is wasted each time a train stops at one of the 28 stations on SEPTA's Market-Frankford Line. In a six-car train, the brakes produce about 3 million watts of power during the 15 seconds it takes to halt the 400 tons of hurtling metal, plastic and humanity. Some of the electricity is reused by other trains on the line. Much of the power is lost — dissipated as hot air through the subway car's rooftop vents. But what if the electricity produced by the train's regenerative brakes could be captured and reused, as it is with a hybrid vehicle?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2011
THE GIZMO: There's nothing like a major power-plant disaster to get a person thinking about finding safer, "alternative" sources of energy. So, when I heard that the solar power trade show PV America was meeting in town, I rushed over for a crash course in buying and installing a photovoltaic panel-based home power system. IS MY SITE SUITABLE? Solar panels work best pointing due south and angled toward the sun with minimal shade obstruction. Only about 25 percent of U.S. houses meet the criteria for a roof-mounted system.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant Wednesday to tout his plans to cut the nation's use of imported oil by one-third over the next decade while diversifying its energy sources, White House officials announced Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers; the event is by invitation. Amid rising gasoline prices caused by turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa, Obama has put a renewed emphasis over the last week on the need for energy independence.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
President Obama will visit a Bucks County wind-turbine plant next Wednesday to highlight the administration's policy of diversifying the nation's energy sources and reducing reliance on imported oil, a White House official said Friday. The president plans to stop at Gamesa Technology Corp. in Fairless Hills, Pa., where he will hold a town-hall meeting with workers about building a clean-energy future for the 21st century. Gamesa employs about 300 people at the facility, built on the site of a former U.S. Steel factory, and manufactures turbines used in the generation of wind-powered electricity.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
LIVERMORE, Calif. - By the end of 2010, scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may be celebrating the realization of a decades-long dream: re-creating the reaction that powers the sun and causes hydrogen bombs to explode. Or they'll be sitting on one of the biggest failures in the history of science. The project, called the National Ignition Facility, or NIF, takes up most of a building the size of two football fields. Inside, 192 of the world's most powerful lasers are focused to concentrate unprecedented power into a target of hydrogen atoms, coaxing them to fuse into helium.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A rebate program that Gov. Rendell hoped would entice Pennsylvanians to convert to solar energy is proving particularly popular with businesses - just as the state's primary business-advocacy group is ramping up its campaign against a legislative proposal that would require greater use of alternative energy. The Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry acknowledges that House Bill 80's increased requirements for the use of solar and wind energy would create clean-energy jobs.
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