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NEWS
February 11, 2014
THE YEAR 2013 was tough on the Phillies, but also tough on those who expected continued safe-streets enforcement promised by both the cops and the city government. Regarding bicycles, pedestrians and cars, enforcement in 2012 improved over 2011, but 2013 brought serious backsliding in car and bicycle ticketing. In 2012, cops wrote 152,964 moving violations. Last year, the number of tickets dropped to 117,028 - a whopping 23 percent decrease. In 2012, a paltry 88 tickets were written for bad bicyclists.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
RE YOUR article on school-zone lights: The missing lights are not the problem. I drive through two school zones on my way to work. The one that I am mainly concerned with is Anderson Elementary on Cobbs Creek Parkway. When I go through any school zone, I put on my flashers and drive 15 miles an hour. I think that it is a disgrace that people drive around me or honk on their horns for me to speed up. Every day I see people fly through that school zone. My point: The kids are not safe with or without those lights.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | By John Hall, Special to The Inquirer
After three months without a full-time enforcer - the person who dispenses citations for everything from overgrown weeds to bad plumbing - Upper Southampton has found someone to keep residents, their lawns and their homes in line. Township supervisors announced Tuesday night that Alex Yovish had been appointed code enforcement officer, a position left vacant since Robert McNab stepped down in April. Yovish, who started work Monday, will be paid $19,500 a year. Township manager Robert M. Pellegrino had been acting code enforcement officer.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
MANY SCOOTER owners in the city who have parked their adorable vehicles in the same place on sidewalks for years returned to their scooters yesterday to find them plastered with not-so-adorable $76 tickets from the Philadelphia Parking Authority. According to PPA spokesman Martin O'Rourke, state law has always forbidden parking motorized vehicles on city sidewalks, but the agency didn't issue tickets until it started an enforcement "pilot period" in 2009, when parking kiosks were being installed throughout the city.
NEWS
March 4, 1986 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Secretary of Labor and Industry James W. Knepper has recommended that the state delay enforcement of a fledging "right-to-know" law that requires employers to inform their employees and communities about toxic chemicals used in their operations. Testifying before the House Appropriations Committee yesterday, Knepper said that a federal court ruling in December had eroded the ability of the public to learn about toxic chemicals in their midst. He urged postponing enforcement until appeals of the ruling were complete.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
EARLY in July, I and some friends gathered for the Pennypack Music Festival to hear the Irish band Blackthorn. There was a large crowd, lots of alcohol, the whiff of marijuana in the air and public urination all over the meadow. The park rangers seemed uninterested in correcting these problems as they listened to the music and talked while eating hotdogs. I was appalled by their blatant disregard to enforcing the rules that everyone must follow. Toward the end of the show, a ranger walked over to a group next to ours and grabbed a teen by the shirt and forcefully pushed him through the crowd.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Rep. Newt Gingrich created quite a stir when he said that about one-fourth of the White House staff had a history of drug use before coming to Washington. He didn't identify the person who fed him this statistic, other than to say it came from a "senior law enforcement official. " But since Gingrich is speaker of the House, a former college professor and America's most powerful Republican, would he pass bum information? Of course not. If we can't believe a Washington politician, who can we believe?
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now that Radnor Township has adopted a no-smoking ordinance, township officials face the delicate task of enforcing the restrictions. It won't be easy. In fact, two commissioners, James J. Marks and John L Cappelli, voted against the ordinance, which takes effect Feb. 7, because they said enforcement posed too difficult a task for the township. The ordinance, approved 5-2 at a public hearing last Thursday night, authorizes the township health officer and police department to enforce the law. The ordinance curbs smoking in retail shops, supermarkets, restaurants, public meeting places and transportation waiting rooms.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police in Camden, struggling to control drug use and the violence it spawns, say that next week they plan to begin enforcing an old curfew that in an earlier era was signaled by the blaring of an air raid siren every morning and night. Anyone under the age of 18 will have to be inside between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 p.m. to 6 a.m. Friday and Saturday - unless traveling to or from work, school or church, or driving out of state. Under a companion law, passed in later years but also long since forgotten, parents will also be notified if their children are picked up. That first call will be a warning for the future: Parents or legal guardians face a Municipal Court hearing and a maximum $500 fine or possible jail term of 90 days for failure to supervise their children.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Special to The Inquirer
The jagged Camden-Pennsauken frontier runs four miles, from the Cooper River mud flats near Admiral Wilson Boulevard to the 36th Street causeway that serves the port on Petty's Island. On the Camden side, although many houses boast carefully tended gardens and fresh paint, most blocks are scarred by boarded and abandoned buildings. City housing activists say skittish banks, absentee landlords and lax enforcement of the city housing code are to blame. Officials in Pennsauken hope newly elected Camden Mayor Aaron Thompson will let Pennsauken housing officers cross city lines to cite and fine the owners of rundown Camden properties - especially those within a block of the border.
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NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN IT COMES to brainstorming sessions on building stronger bonds between law-enforcement officials and the communities they serve, one vital group seems to be missing: Young people. "Any police official will tell you these discussions are dominated by older folks," Deputy Commissioner Richard Ross said yesterday at the U.S. Attorney's Office in Center City after one such discussion. "Without them, we can't get to the core of the issues at hand, and it's clear why: They have the most contact with police.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
They lined up as Evesham Township Judge Karen Caplan called their names. First one row, all ticketed for using a cellphone while driving. Then a second, a third, and a fourth. The pack grew to nearly 40 people, all planning to plead guilty, when Caplan finished the list. "Were you using a handheld cellphone while driving?" Caplan asked each person, eliciting the inevitable "yes" in response. First-time offenders received $200 fines, second-time violators had to pay $400, as state law mandates, and so on. More than the amount of the fines, it was the size of the crowd he was in that surprised Dave DiMedio, 55, a lumber company owner from Medford.
SPORTS
December 29, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
NASHVILLE - The situation is deliciously ironic. Flyers coach Craig Berube, a one-time NHL bad boy who finished his career with the seventh-highest penalty-minutes total in league history, steadfastly insists his team does not need an enforcer. The subject came up again after Winnipeg's Dustin Byfuglien threw his 6-foot-5, 260-pound frame at Claude Giroux, Jake Voracek, Brayden Schenn, et al in the Flyers' 4-3 overtime win last Sunday. Giroux, a 5-foot-11, 172-pound center who has been the NHL's leading scorer over the last four-plus seasons, absorbed at least a half-dozen hits from Byfuglien, who weighs 88 pounds more than the Flyers' captain.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Cornell Edens was the proverbial innocent. On a Sunday evening in December 2011, he was walking down the sidewalk in Germantown, on his way to visit his elderly mother. Edens worked occasionally, but mainly lived on disability checks. As his sister put it, he had been "always behind in school. " He was 59 years old and mentally challenged. Archie McLean was anything but innocent. He had served time for robbery and gun convictions. That night, Dec. 18, McLean was driving drunk on Price Street when his Toyota minivan jumped the sidewalk and rolled onto Edens, crushing him to death.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police briefly quarantined a house in South Philadelphia on Thursday morning after a woman who had recently returned from central Africa was suffering abdominal pain, high fever, and aching joints, law enforcement sources said. Despite initial concerns that the woman could be suffering from Ebola, doctors and the city Department of Public Health quickly determined she was not infected with the virus, which has claimed thousands of lives in West Africa. Health Department spokesman Jeff Moran said "rumors of a suspected Ebola case in South Philadelphia" were reviewed by the department's Division of Disease Control - and emergency services physicians.
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
BLOOMING GROVE, Pa. - After more than two weeks on the run, police say, Eric Frein must be tired. He has hastily left behind two homemade bombs, ammunition, and other supplies as he scrambles to avoid capture, they said Tuesday. Both explosives were found since Monday. That, and a fresh sighting, convinced investigators that the accused gunman is "undoubtedly" still hiding in roughly five square miles of forest in Monroe and Pike Counties, State Police Lt. Col. George Bivens said.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
BLOOMING GROVE, Pa. - A man described as a "survivalist," a trained marksman with antigovernment leanings, was the gunman who killed one state police officer and injured a second in an ambush outside the barracks here last week, investigators said Tuesday. At an afternoon news conference, police said they identified 31-year-old Eric Matthew Frein from documents he left in a Jeep he abandoned about two miles from the barracks, where he ambushed Cpl. Bryon K. Dickson and Trooper Alex Douglass on Friday.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
In response to the police shooting of a young black man in Ferguson, Mo., about 100 people gathered Tuesday night in Norristown for a public forum on race, law enforcement, and community relations. The discussion, hosted by Zeta Phi Beta sorority's Montgomery County chapter, spanned a wide range of topics, from arrest and incarceration to education, ingrained social systems, and economics. The moderator, community activist Buck Jones, read a list of more than a dozen names - all young black men, unarmed, killed by police in recent years across the country.
SPORTS
July 30, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany says he isn't happy with the NCAA's enforcement process. He discussed the need for improvements Monday on the first day of the conference's media days. Delany said he doesn't think the NCAA has been effective in meting out punishments to schools that are under investigation for violations. Over the last few years, several investigations have dragged on, demonstrating some of the inefficiencies of the process. "It's fairly clear to me that the conferences have to get together and find a mechanism or a process that serves our needs," Delany said.
NEWS
July 29, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sgt. William McGovern of the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office fatally ran over a motorcyclist and called 911 last July 27. Then, minutes after he learned the victim was off-duty Moorestown Patrolman Craig Berner, McGovern left the scene on Westfield Road to feed a friend's cat, according to law enforcement records. Although McGovern returned within an hour of the 10 p.m. crash - and township police then documented that he smelled of alcohol - authorities called off a sobriety test requested by a Moorestown officer.
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